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Beetlejuice Cast: Where Are They Now?

Beetlejuice is an absolute 80s classic – but at the same time it’s probably one of the strangest movies of all time! Beetlejuice follows the story of the Maitlands who sadly pass away at the start of the film and then go on to have their home “infested” with an annoying couple (the Deetzes) and their goth daughter Lydia.

Sick of being annoyed by this new family while trying to enjoy a peaceful afterlife, the Maitlands turn to Beetlejuice to help them ‘exorcise’ their house.

Beetlejuice is keen to offer up his services to the Maitlands, but of course he doesn’t tell them the true cost of his help and plenty of problems ensue! The movie proved to be another hit for director Tim Burton and featured Michael Keaton at the height of his fame. A young Winona Ryder starred as Lydia, with Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis starring as the Maitlands.

With such a stellar cast of actors (plus plenty of other hilarious characters to deal with), in the article below we’ve taken a look at where the cast of Beetlejuice are now. Scroll down to see what all of the main cast members from the movie are up to these days…some of the results might just surprise you. Enjoy!

1. Michael Keaton – Beetlejuice

Michael Keaton was the star of the show as Beetlejuice, ‘The Ghost With The Most’ who promised to be able to deal with the living in order to help those who were deceased and hadn’t yet departed to the afterlife. He ends up tricking everyone in order to try and marry poor Lydia, but his plan fails and in the end ‘Betelgeuse’ is forced to go back to the afterlife waiting room (where his head is promptly shrunk by a witch doctor!).

After making Beetlejuice, Keaton went on to star in Batman and Batman Returns. After a brief lull in his movie career, Keaton has made a resurgence in recent years, starring in award-winning films such as Spotlight and Birdman. He is currently bringing in the big bucks by appearing in the Spiderman franchise as Adrian Toomes/Vulture.

2. Alec Baldwin – Adam Maitland

This was one of Alec Baldwin’s first ever film roles! Baldwin played Adam Maitland, a run-of-the-mill guy who runs a hardware store and just wants to spend his vacation at home with his wife, helping to do up their home to make it perfect in every way they can. Suddenly his character has to deal with being dead, and that’s when things start to get very interesting indeed…

Alec Baldwin is now well-known as a very prolific and talented actor, starring in some major productions including the TV series 30 Rock in which he played Jack Donaghy, as well as some big movies including Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation and The Looming Tower. Most recently, he appeared in BlackKklansman and another instalment of the Mission: Impossible movies.

3. Geena Davis – Barbara Maitland

Barbara Maitland was the wife of Adam and was just as eager to get their new house looking perfect. Unfortunately, Barbara is behind the wheel of the car when she is driving home with her husband and swerves to avoid a dog, crashing the car in the process. She is especially upset at the arrival of the horrible Deetz family in what was supposed to be their home.

Geena Davis has had a very successful career in the world of entertainment. Two years after Beetlejuice, she starred in Thelma & Louise – her performance earned her a Best Actress nomination at the 1992 Academy Awards. She also starred in the Stuart Little movies and has a recurring role on Grey’s Anatomy.

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4. Winona Ryder – Lydia Deetz

Lydia was the dark and moody daughter of the Deetz family who moved in to the Maitlands’ home. She is the only one who can initially see the deceased pair and quickly befriends the Maitlands, even attempting to help them with their predicament. Lydia narrowly avoids an ill-fated marriage to the terrifying Beetlejuice, but in the end everything works out for the best.

Lydia was played by none other than Winona Ryder, who was one of the best and most successful actresses in Hollywood during the late 80s and 90s. Her career took a dip after that infamous shoplifting incident, but in recent years she is back on our screens, playing Joyce Byers in Stranger Things to lots of critical acclaim. Ryder also appeared in Destination Wedding opposite Keanu Reeves in 2018.

5. Catherine O’Hara – Delia Deetz

Delia Deetz is the mother of the family that move in and she really is a nightmare to be around. Delia was an interior designer with an unusual taste in decor and her personality was just awful, through and through. No wonder the Maitlands want to get rid of her!

Of course, Catherine O’Hara went on to play the mum in Home Alone and Home Alone 2, and she as been acting regularly ever since. Most recently, O’Hara appeared on our screens in the TV version of A Series of Unfortunate Events. She has won critical acclaim for several of her other TV roles and was nominated for a Primetime Emmy for her performance in Temple Grandin.

7 Pictures Of The “Beetlejuice” Cast Then Vs. Now

#1 Michael Keaton as Betelgeuse


Fun fact: Despite being the namesake of the film, Betelgeuse is on-screen for only about 17 minutes.

#2 Winona Ryder as Lydia Deetz


Fun fact: Ryder beat out Juliette Lewis for the part of Lydia, thanks to her role as Rina in the 1986 teen flick Lucas.
#3 Alec Baldwin as Adam Maitland

Fun fact: Beetlejuice was only Baldwin’s third feature film after starting off as a TV actor.

#4 Geena Davis as Barbara Maitland


Fun fact: Over a decade after Beetlejuice, Davis and Jeffrey Jones both starred in 1999’s Stuart Little.
#5 Catherine O’Hara as Delia Deetz

Fun fact: Catherine O’Hara was introduced to her husband, Bo Welch, during filming. He was a production designer on set.

#6 Jeffrey Jones as Charles Deetz


Fun fact: Jones appeared alongside his on-screen daughter Winona Ryder in 1996’s The Crucible.
#7 Patrice Martinez as the Receptionist

Fun fact: Martinez is the older sister of How to Get Away With Murder’s Benito Martinez.
Glenn Shadix, who played the Deetz family’s interior designer, passed away in 2010. His final role was Arkana in The Little Engine That Could.

Beetlejuice Stock Photos and Images

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  • Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis / Beetlejuice / 1988 directed by Tim Burton
  • Portugal, Algarve, Circa 15.02.2018. Isolated on white background image shot of a highly detailed Neca figure of Beetlejuice..
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  • ‘Beetlejuice’ Marquee at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway, New York City, USA
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  • Original Film Title: BEETLEJUICE. English Title: BEETLEJUICE. Film Director: TIM BURTON. Year: 1988. Stars: WINONA RYDER; MICHAEL KEATON. Credit: GEFFEN FILM/WARNER BROTHERS / Album
  • Westfield, Shepherds Bush, London, UK. 2nd October 2014. Beetlejuice models. An exhibition of collectable movie memorabilia from classic movies that will be auctioned, films include; Star Wars, The Shining, Batman etc. The auction takes place on the 16th October. Credit: Matthew Chattle/Alamy Live News
  • New York, NY, USA. 23rd July, 2019. Sandy the Sandworm, The Shrunken Head Guy, Sophia Anne Caruso, Alex Brightman Photo Call for BEETLEJUICE on Broadway Celebrates 100th Performance, Winter Garden Theatre, New York, NY July 23, 2019. Credit: Jason Smith/Everett Collection/Alamy Live News
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Michael Keaton coiffure, costume raye, manege
  • BEETLEJUICE -1987 MICHAEL KEATON
  • Theatre Marquee for ‘Beetlejuice’ at the National Theatre on November 4, 2018 in Washington, DC Credit: Walter McBride/MediaPunch
  • Studio Publicity Still from ‘Beetlejuice’ Michael Keaton © 1988 Warner All Rights Reserved File Reference # 31694340THA For Editorial Use Only
  • RELEASE DATE: March 29, 1988. MOVIE TITLE: Beetle Juice. STUDIO: Geffen Pictures. PLOT: After Barbara and Adam Maitland were killed in a car crash, they find themselves trapped as ghosts in their beautiful New England farmhouse. Their peace is disrupted when a yuppie family, the Deetzs, buy their house. The Maitlands are too nice and harmless as ghosts and all their efforts to scare the Deetzs away were unsuccessful. They eventually turn to another ghost ‘Beetlejuice’ for help… PICTURED: Actor MICHAEL KEATON stars as Betelgeuse, the ghost that wrecks havoc on everyone.
  • Studio Publicity Still from ‘Beetlejuice’ Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin © 1988 Warner All Rights Reserved File Reference # 32914_016THA For Editorial Use Only
  • Pantages Theater, Universal Orlando’s Horror Make-Up Show, Sign above Entrance, Beetlejuice character, Universal Studios Resort, Orlando, Florida, USA
  • Jun 11, 2007 – Miami, Florida, USA – BEETLEJUICE photographed in Miami, Forida. (Credit Image: © David Jacobs/ZUMA Press)
  • Beetlejuice at the Winter Garden Theatre, New York City, NY, USA
  • Throngs of theatergoers descend on the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway in New York to see a performance on Thursday, December 12, 2019 of the musical “Beetlejuice”. (© Richard B. Levine)
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  • BEETLEJUICE MICHAEL KEATON Date: 1988
  • Portugal, Algarve, Circa 15.02.2018. Isolated on white background image shot of a highly detailed Neca figure of Beetlejuice..
  • Diego (dressed as Beetlejuice) at the Romics convention, XX Edition, on the Nuova Fiera Di Roma, Via Portuense, Rome. Featuring: Diego Where: Rome, Italy When: 01 Oct 2016 Credit: IPA/WENN.com **Only available for publication in UK, USA, Germany, Austri
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Michael Keaton cimetiere, mort-vivant, debraille
  • BEETLEJUICE (1987) ALEC BALDWIN, GEENA DAVIS BTJ 070
  • ‘Beetlejuice’ Marquee at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway, New York City, USA
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  • Football fan in Beetlejuice cosplay costume at NFL Draft 2019, Nashville Tennessee, USA.
  • New York, NY – September, 2019: View of the marquee and sign for the famous Winter Garden Theater showing Beetlejuice in the Theater District of Manha
  • Beetlejuice at the Winter Garden Theatre, New York City, NY, USA
  • Throngs of theatergoers descend on the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway in New York to see a performance on Thursday, December 12, 2019 of the musical “Beetlejuice”. (© Richard B. Levine)
  • Beetlejuice
  • Westfield, Shepherds Bush, London, UK. 2nd October 2014. Beetlejuice models. An exhibition of collectable movie memorabilia from classic movies that will be auctioned, films include; Star Wars, The Shining, Batman etc. The auction takes place on the 16th October. Credit: Matthew Chattle/Alamy Live News
  • mannequin wearing beetlejuice wig studio cut out
  • Throngs of theatergoers descend on the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway in New York to see a performance on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 of the musical “Bettlejuiceâ€, nominated for 8 Tony Awards including Best Musical. (© Richard B. Levine)
  • Beetlejuice s Graveyard Revue Universal Studios Orlando, Florida
  • beetlejuice and Gary Garver
  • BEETLEJUICE WINONA RYDER Date: 1988
  • Portugal, Algarve, Circa 15.02.2018. Isolated on white background image shot of a highly detailed Neca figure of Beetlejuice..
  • New York, NY, USA. 23rd July, 2019. The cast Photo Call for BEETLEJUICE on Broadway Celebrates 100th Performance, Winter Garden Theatre, New York, NY July 23, 2019. Credit: Jason Smith/Everett Collection/Alamy Live News
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Michael Keaton cimetiere, mort-vivant, debraille
  • TIM BURTON (DIR) O/S ‘BEETLEJUICE’ (1987) TMBT 003
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Winona Ryder et Michael Keaton coiffure, ebouriffe,
  • ‘Beetlejuice’ Marquee at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway, New York City, USA
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Michael Keaton et Winona Ryder fantomes, monstres, horreur
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  • Football fan in Beetlejuice cosplay costume at NFL Draft 2019, Nashville Tennessee, USA.
  • Beetlejuice impersonator at Coco Bongo nightclub Cancun and Playa del Carmen Mexico
  • Beetlejuice at the Winter Garden Theatre, New York City, NY, USA
  • BEETLEJUICE, Geena Davis, Michael Keaton, Alec Baldwin, 1988
  • Beetlejuice Beetlejuice 1988 Tim Burton Michael Keaton
  • Original Film Title: BEETLEJUICE. English Title: BEETLEJUICE. Film Director: TIM BURTON. Year: 1988. Credit: GEFFEN FILM/WARNER BROTHERS / Album
  • piggybank wearing a beetlejuice wig cutout
  • Throngs of theatergoers descend on the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway in New York to see a performance on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 of the musical “Bettlejuiceâ€, nominated for 8 Tony Awards including Best Musical. (© Richard B. Levine)
  • West Hollywood, California, USA 31st October 2019 A general view of atmosphere of Beetlejuice at West Hollywood Halloween Carnaval 2019 on October 31, 2019 in West Hollywood, California, USA. Photo by Barry King/Alamy Live News
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  • BEETLEJUICE MICHAEL KEATON Date: 1988
  • Beverly Hills, CA – Chloe Sevigny takes an important call while out in Beverly Hills this afternoon, wearing a Beetlejuice inspired outfit. The actress wore a black and white striped dress with a black jacket. Chloe recently made a trip to China to host the opening celebration for iAMP’s Flagship Store and it was announced that she is the brand’s latest style ambassador. AKM-GSI March 12, 2014
  • New York, NY, USA. 23rd July, 2019. The cast Photo Call for BEETLEJUICE on Broadway Celebrates 100th Performance, Winter Garden Theatre, New York, NY July 23, 2019. Credit: Jason Smith/Everett Collection/Alamy Live News
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  • BEETLEJUICE ALEC BALDWIN, MICHAEL KEATON, GEENA DAVIS BTJ 007
  • A view of the ‘Beetle House’ restaurant which is decorated in the dark-romantic artistic style of US film director Tim Burton in New York, m USA, 27 April 2016. The restaurant is dedicated to Burton and is called ‘Beetle House’ in reference to Burton’s breakthough movie ‘Beetlejuice’ from 1988. Photo: Christina Horsten/dpa
  • ‘Beetlejuice’ Marquee at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway, New York City, USA
  • Beetlejuice s Graveyard Revue building Universal Studios Orlando Florida
  • ‘Beetlejuice’ Marquee at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway, New York City, USA
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  • Studio Publicity Still from ‘Beetlejuice’ Slyvia Sidney © (1988) Warner Bros. File Reference # 33751_745THA
  • White Stretch Limo in front of Beetlejuice at the Winter Garden Theatre, New York City, NY, USA
  • Theatre Marquee for ‘Beetlejuice’ at the National Theatre on November 4, 2018 in Washington, DC Credit: Walter McBride/MediaPunch
  • Beetlejuice Beetlejuice 1988 Tim Burton Alec Baldwin Geena Davis
  • Original Film Title: BEETLEJUICE. English Title: BEETLEJUICE. Film Director: TIM BURTON. Year: 1988. Credit: GEFFEN FILM/WARNER BROTHERS / Album
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Winona Ryder
  • File photo dated 15/07/15 of of a man dressed as Beetlejuice attending a Halloween-themed funeral, as a report reveals that funerals are becoming a celebration of someone’s life rather than sombre occasions, with themes including Halloween or superhero.
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE de Tim Burton 1988 USA affiche française debraille, coiffure, cimetiere, costume raye
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  • BEETLEJUICE STEPHEN OUIMETTE voices Beetlejuice
  • Beverly Hills, CA – Chloe Sevigny takes an important call while out in Beverly Hills this afternoon, wearing a Beetlejuice inspired outfit. The actress wore a black and white striped dress with a black jacket. Chloe recently made a trip to China to host the opening celebration for iAMP’s Flagship Store and it was announced that she is the brand’s latest style ambassador. AKM-GSI March 12, 2014
  • BEETLEJUICE
  • New York, NY, USA. 23rd July, 2019. The cast Photo Call for BEETLEJUICE on Broadway Celebrates 100th Performance, Winter Garden Theatre, New York, NY July 23, 2019. Credit: Jason Smith/Everett Collection/Alamy Live News
  • TIM BURTON (DIR) O/S ‘BEETLEJUICE’ (1987) MICHAEL KEATON TMBT 004
  • Pedestrians walk past the ‘Beetle House’ restaurant which is decorated in the dark-romantic artsitic style of US film director Tim Burton in New York, m USA, 27 April 2016. The restaurant is dedicated to Burton and is called ‘Beetle House’ in reference to Burton’s breakthough movie ‘Beetlejuice’ from 1988. Photo: Christina Horsten/dpa
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Geena Davis cafard geant
  • UNIVERSAL CITY, CA – APRIL 20: (L-R) Actors Joey Lawrence, Beetlejuice and Jeremy Licht attend Superstar Kids Challenge event on April 20, 1991 at Universal Studios in Universal City, California. Photo by Barry King/Alamy Stock Photo
  • ‘Beetlejuice’ Marquee at the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway, New York City, USA
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  • Studio Publicity Still from ‘Beetlejuice’ Geena Davis © 1988 Warner All Rights Reserved File Reference # 31694347THA For Editorial Use Only
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Jeffrey Jones et Catherine O’Hara
  • Theatre Marquee for ‘Beetlejuice’ at the National Theatre on November 4, 2018 in Washington, DC Credit: Walter McBride/MediaPunch
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Geena Davis mariee, baskets, converse
  • Original Film Title: BEETLEJUICE. English Title: BEETLEJUICE. Film Director: TIM BURTON. Year: 1988. Credit: GEFFEN FILM/WARNER BROTHERS / Album
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA affiche, debraille, coiffure, cimetiere, costume raye
  • Embargoed to 0001 Monday May 8 File photo dated 15/07/15 of of a man dressed as Beetlejuice attending a Halloween-themed funeral, as a report reveals that funerals are becoming a celebration of someone’s life rather than sombre occasions, with themes including Halloween or superhero.
  • Prod DB © Warner Bros / DR BEETLEJUICE (BEETLEJUICE) de Tim Burton 1988 USA avec Geena Davis et Alec Baldwin cimetiere

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5 Things You Might Not Know About Tim Burton’s ‘Beetlejuice’

This week, Tim Burton‘s wild supernatural comedy “Beetlejuice” turns a whopping 25 years old. A funny/scary ode to both the potential liveliness of haunted houses and the deathly drudgery of everyday life, it stars Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis as the Maitlands, a pair of suburban Connecticut softies who, after their death in a tragi-comic automobile accident, have to try and spook the upper crust Manhattanites named the Deetzes who have taken up residence in their home (the all-star family consists of Jeffrey Jones and Catherine O’Hara as the parents and Winona Ryder as Lydia, their sullen daughter). Since they don’t have what it takes to scare away their new houseguests, they have to call on Betelgeuse (an unstoppable Michael Keaton), a self-styled “bio-exorcist,” to get rid of them. And all hell (quite literally) breaks loose.

“Beetlejuice” remains one of Tim Burton’s most fully realized, vibrantly stylized films – and one of his funniest, too. Released on March 30, 1988, the film proved to be a smash hit (the tenth biggest grossing of its year), won terrific reviews (no less than Pauline Kael called it “a comedy classic”), and helped Burton land the biggest job around, directing “Batman.” To commemorate the occasion, we’ve compiled a list of five things that you might not know about the endlessly quotable, wonderfully inventive “Beetlejuice.” And for more Tim Burton, here’s his “5 Essential Films,” 10 of His Unmade Movies and let’s not forget a reported sequel is on the way.

1. It Was Originally Meant To Be Way More Violent
While “Beetlejuice” is regularly trotted out as a successful example of the tonally tricky combination of horror and comedy, original versions of the story leaned much heavier on the former than the latter. Screenwriter Michael McDowell, who originally worked with Larry Wilson on the story (they were both replaced by Warren Skaaren at Burton’s behest – more on this in a minute) and who was a well-known and respected writer of paperback novels, originally conceived of the script as a much bleaker, more horror-driven piece. The original script featured a much more intense version of the Maitlands’ car crash (in this version Geena Davis‘ character’s arm gets smashed in graphic detail; subsequent drafts kept a reference to this), while the Betelgeuse character isn’t a charming (if skeezy) used car salesman of the undead; instead he was envisioned as leather-winged demon whose humanoid form is that of a squat Middle Eastern man (subsequent drafts had him talking in a kind of African American pidgin dialect).

There are superficial details that changed, like the deletion of a younger Deetz sister, named Cathy, who had the ability to see the Maitlands, but the main difference between the initial McDowell drafts and what came after was the tone – Betelgeuse isn’t interested in merely scaring the Maitlands but is, instead, a homicidal maniac, hellbent on murder and rape. Imagine: instead of that great climactic wedding sequence, where Betelgeuse tries to tie the knot with Lydia, it was replaced with one in which Betelgeuse attempts to rape Winona Ryder. Not exactly a crowd pleaser.

At the wildly popular MoMA Tim Burton exhibit from a few years ago, there were original versions of the script on display, complete with Tim Burton’s handwritten notes, which even then indicated the shift away from gory bleakness to a more light-hearted celebration of the macabre. Skaaren (who would go on to heavily rewrite Sam Hamm‘s original “Batman” script for Burton) added playfulness to the original “Beetlejuice” screenplay’s more existential dread (instead of a moon of Jupiter, the Maitlands would open the door and see giant gears grinding up the fabric of time against a pitiless black void). It was still more violent than what the movie ended up being, but you can see where everyone was headed.

McDowell, for his part, co-wrote (with Wilson) “The Jar,” the 1986 episode of “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” that helped put Burton on the map (watch it below). And before McDowell’s tragic death in 1999, at the age of 49, due to complications related to AIDS, the two would work together again. Burton would call upon McDowell to help with the script for an ambitious stop motion project for Disney that would end up being the beloved “The Nightmare Before Christmas.”

2. Burton Wanted Sammy Davis, Jr. For The Title Role
As is stated above, the Betelgeuse character was drastically different than what ended up on screen. Originally conceived as a winged and demonic presence, taking human form as a small Middle Eastern man, subsequent drafts made him more African American, and he spoke in a kind of pidgin dialect that probably been downright Jar Jar Binks-ish.

In keeping with this characterization, and continuing his trend of casting his movies like he’s assembling a list of interesting guests for a 1970s variety show, Burton expressed interest in casting original Rat Pack member Sammy Davis, Jr. in the title role. While this makes a certain amount of sense (anything does when refracted through the gonzo Burton lens), it would have resulted in a completely different Betelgeuse – loungy, laid back, and probably a little more lascivious. Thankfully, producer David Geffen, who had been developing the script under his shingle at Warner Bros, stepped in and suggested Michael Keaton. Burton, unsurprisingly, was impressed from the beginning, with the actor’s live wire performance still among this best. Keaton also wound up in the title role of Burton’s next movie, “Batman,” a decision that would cause an outcry in fans, since Keaton was primarily known as a comic actor (“Mr. Mom” had been a big hit a number of years earlier). But the rest, as they say, is history.

3. Warner Bros. Hated The Title
The title for “Beetlejuice” is a play on the character Betelgeuse’s name, which in turn based on the Betelgeuse star, which is housed in the infinite blackness of space but in the same constellation as the more famous star Orion. (Screenwriter McDowell was surprised anyone picked up on the reference.) Warner Bros, however, didn’t think there was anything clever or funny or interesting about the movie’s title, and begged Tim Burton to allow them to change it. He refused.

The alternate title the studio had come up with was “House Ghosts,” which, at the very least, beats out “Anonymous Haunted House Story 39480,” which more or less conveys the same general mood and aura. Burton, the story goes, suggested “Scared Sheetless” as a joke (a reference to the scene where the Maitlands attempt to scare the Deetzes out of the house by wearing bed sheets – something they consider spooky but comes off as utterly laughable). Much to Burton’s horror, the studio actually liked his idea, and tried to rename the movie. Burton finally put his foot down and said that the movie would be called “Beetlejuice.” Once and for all.

4. There Was A Hugely Popular Animated Spin-Off
Some might remember that “Beetlejuice” inspired an animated spin-off series that was snappily (if somewhat crudely) illustrated in the style of the movie, complete with Danny Elfman music serving as the series’ theme. In the show, Betelgeuse (who Lydia referred to as BJ) and Lydia would travel between the real world and “The Netherworld” and get into all sorts of creepy/cuddly adventures. What you might not remember is how phenomenally popular the series was.

It ran from 1989 to 1992 and amassed almost a hundred episodes. At one point, new episodes were airing on ABC‘s Saturday Morning line-up while additional episodes ran during the week on Fox. (Historically, only a handful of shows have aired at the same time on two different broadcast networks.) In other words: it was huge. The show still airs on the AOL channel Toontopia TV, and in May, the entire series will be released on DVD courtesy of Shout Factory. Expect a lot of twenty-somethings to buy the set and say something along the lines of, “Well this was weirder than I remembered it being.”

5. A Tropical-Set Sequel Was Planned
On one of his endless live talks, Kevin Smith recounts his fruitless experiences being wooed by the big studios, post-“Chasing Amy.” At one point he was brought to Warner Bros. and given a choice of projects to work on and potentially develop. One, he says, was “Beetlejuice Goes Hawaiian.” (“Must we go tropical?” Smith wondered in the stand-up special.) The other project was another Tim Burton joint, one that would lead to a long and particularly painful development process for Smith and pretty much everyone involved, millions of dollars being spent on cast members, costumes, and pre-production work that would ultimately never see the light of day. That film was “Superman Lives.”

Anyway, back to the “Beetlejuice” sequel. Warner Bros. was pressuring Burton for a sequel to the hit film, and Burton shot back with the idea of letting Betelgeuse unleash his mischief on the Hawaiian islands. They even hired a screenwriter, Jonathan Gems (with “Heathers” scribe Daniel Waters brought on for a polish later on), and formally announced the project for the summer of 1990. Gems later described the thought process as such: “Tim thought it would be funny to match the surfing backdrop of a beach movie with some sort of German Expressionism, because they’re totally wrong together.”

Everything stayed pretty quiet on the sequel front, with a longstanding legal wrangle going on between Warner Bros. and Geffen over who, exactly, owns the rights to the character. In 2011, it was announced that Seth Grahame-Smith, who wrote “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” and who had just worked with Burton on an adaptation of his own “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” and a big screen revamp of “Dark Shadows” for the director, was working on a “Beetlejuice” sequel (last year he said it was still on). It is assumed that the script he’s developing is not set in Hawaii.

So, if you haven’t watched “Beetlejuice” in a while or this piece has nudged you to revisit it, please leave your thoughts below. Or say Beetlejuice Beetlejuice Beetlejuice and we’ll just appear.

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And no, we still don’t have any real news on the sequel.

Next year will be a big year for Beetlejuice, as the beloved Tim Burton film will turn the ripe old age of 30. The film was released on March 30th, 1988, which means we’re literally just about one year away from the big celebration. Of course, it needn’t be an anniversary to celebrate a film as awesome as Beetlejuice. So ya know what? We’re not waiting. Waiting sucks.

Over on Imgur this week, one fan (redditmason) put together a 34-image gallery of behind the scenes shots from the set of Beetlejuice, most of which I personally had never seen. Granted, many of these photographs have been floating around the net for a while now, but we just figured you could use a smile today. After all, it’s Monday. And Mondays, like waiting, totally suck.

The behind the scenes images showcase how some of the film’s iconic special effects were pulled off, but it’s the photos of the cast and crew (including Michael Keaton, Winona Ryder and Alec Baldwin) goofing around on set that really brought a smile to my face. Check out the full gallery below, and view some freshly unearthed Beetlejuice workprint scenes while you’re at it!

Behind the Scenes of Beetlejuice (1987.)

Beetlejuice at 30: The Long Afterlife of Tim Burton’s Classic as One of the Great Fashion Movies

Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice. Three decades later—this Friday, March 30, marks the 30th anniversary of its premiere—Beetlejuice is still a favorite nostalgia totem (naturally, it’s referenced in Steven Spielberg‘s 80’s trivia blockbuster Ready Player One) and still a favorite Halloween costume (of Gen Xers trick or treating with their kids mostly, but still). (It’s even coming to Broadway soon.) Maybe most trenchantly, the Tim Burton movie has acquired a reputation as a fashion classic, and for good reason. Think of all the indelible, wild style moments in this burlesque of a film that have influenced everything that came after: The romantic cobweb knits worn by Winona Ryder as Lydia Deetz was basically the origin story of Rodarte; Catherine O’Hara’s iconic sartorial daffiness as Delia Deetz (remember, she actually wore her husband’s sweater as pants) was like a screen version, in the best way, of the late Isabella Blow; and of course Michael Keaton’s boldly-striped and dandyishly-cut suits as Betelgeuse begat waves of male street style sprezz, for better or worse. All that, and we haven’t even mentioned Ryder’s pre-Britney schoolgirl look. Here, let’s celebrate the movie that made goth glamorous.

Biography Newsletters

Movies and TV Shows

‘Beetlejuice,’ ‘Edward Scissorhands,’ ‘Heathers’

Ryder made her film debut in the coming-of-age drama Lucas (1986). In many of her early films, she played a variety of roles. She was the eccentric, gothic Lydia in 1988’s horror-comedy Beetlejuice, directed by Tim Burton. Ryder soon appeared as a teenager who falls for the unusual title character in Edward Scissorhands (1990), with then-boyfriend Johnny Depp. In the dark comedy Heathers (1989), she played a high school girl battling for her place in the popularity food chain.

‘Dracula,’ ‘The Age of Innocence,’ ‘Little Women’ and ‘Girl, Interrupted’

Ryder graduated to more grown-up roles with Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992). Her work on The Age of Innocence (1993) earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Two years later, she received another nod from the academy with a Best Actress nomination for her role as Jo in Little Women (1995). While she gave a strong performance in Girl, Interrupted (1999) as a young woman in a mental institution, Ryder made several forgettable films around this time, including the box office dud Autumn in New York (2000).

‘A Scanner Darkly,’ ‘The Darwin Awards’ and ‘Sex and Death 101’

After keeping a relatively low profile for several years, Ryder returned in 2006 with a leading role in A Scanner Darkly, the animated adaptation of a futuristic Philip K. Dick novel, and also starred in the indie comedy The Darwin Awards. She went on to an eclectic mix of projects, including The Ten (2007), a satirical look at the Ten Commandments, and Sex and Death 101 (2007), written and directed by Daniel Waters, the screenwriter of Heathers. Waters and Ryder also reportedly discussed creating a sequel to Heathers.

‘When Love Is Not Enough,’ ‘Black Swan’ and ‘Destination Wedding’

Rebuilding her reputation as a prominent actress, Ryder earned praise for her co-starring role in the 2010 TV movie When Love Is Not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story. She also featured prominently in films like Black Swan (2010), The Dilemma (2011), The Iceman (2012) and Homefront (2013). After many years professionally apart, Ryder and her old Dracula co-star Keanu Reeves reunited in 2018 for the rom-com Destination Wedding.

‘Stranger Things’

In 2016, Ryder began starring in the TV show Stranger Things, a sci-fi drama set in small-town Indiana in the early 1980s. She received a Golden Globe nomination after its initial run for her portrayal of Joyce Byers, a single mom whose son mysteriously disappears. Stranger Things was still going strong into its third season, which debuted on July 4, 2019.

Shoplifting Charges

Ryder found herself under intense public scrutiny in December 2001, after she was charged with shoplifting more than $5,000 worth of merchandise from Saks Fifth Avenue in Beverly Hills, California. Several types of prescription medication were found in her possession at the time of the arrest. Every step of Ryder’s journey through the judicial process made the news. Despite pleading not guilty, she was convicted of vandalism and grand theft in November 2002. Ryder was sentenced to 480 hours of community service and three years’ probation. She was also ordered to pay several fines and undergo counseling.

Relationships

During her more than 30 years as a performer, Ryder has been romantically linked to several different actors and musicians, including Depp, Matt Damon and Dave Pirner from the band Soul Asylum. She and Depp were engaged for a time in 1990s, and he had her name tattooed on his arm. Ryder has since been involved in a long-term relationship with fashion designer Scott Mackinlay Hahn.

In August 2018, Ryder made headlines when she suggested to Entertainment Weekly that she may be legally married to Reeves. She said that Dracula director Francis Ford Coppola used a real Romanian priest for their wedding scene in the 1992 film, with the two actors undergoing an entire marriage ceremony before saying their “I do’s.”

Actor Profile: Winona Ryder

Winona Ryder was born Winona Laura Horowitz on October 29, 1971 in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Her acting career is one of highs and lows, but she’s remained a steady force in film since her arrival in 1986. Predominantly known for her subsequent roles in the following twenty years, she’s recently scratched a new surface, television, with her recurring role as Joyce Byers in Netflix’s Stranger Things. In other words: she’s dominating right now.

She found her start in the David Seltzer’s 1986 film Lucas with Corey Haim, and then Daniel Petrie‘s 1987 Square Dance, but it wasn’t until Tim Burton’s Beetlejuice that she became a mainstream icon.

Some have called her career “rocky” and there are definitely some movies that weren’t well received, or films that were but she wasn’t an ideal casting for, but it doesn’t tarnish what’s worth appreciating. Despite this, she’s played several complex characters over the years, daring you to forget about her. She’s been able to embody youth, and was the talk of envy among many 90’s teenage girls. No matter what the role is, she manages to convey sincere emotion in those big brown eyes.

Edward Scissorhands (1990) – source: 20th Century Fox

When I was growing up, she was one of my heroes. I think it was because I frequently watched her movies when she portrayed a teenager or young woman. Her characters were so often independent and were ones who occasionally had trouble finding their path in life. How could I not relate? As a young actress she always showed depth and range, and it was difficult not to fall in love with her characters. There’s hopefully lots more to come, but for now, let’s look back on her most iconic roles with a heavy and healthy dose of nostalgia.

The Burton Effect

You’d be hard pressed to find anyone who hasn’t seen (or adored) Beetlejuice and Edward Scissorhands. In both, Winona Ryder is a significant presence, ensuring that within these Tim Burton classics, you remember her.

As Lydia, the photography loving, black wearing, sullen teen, she’s truly the focal point of Beetlejuice. Yes, Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis’s characters are technically the main characters, as the newly dead couple. Of course, Michael Keaton’s titular lunatic steals every scene he’s in. However, Lydia is at the center; she’s the viewer’s north. With no aversion to ghosts she finds herself among the living and dead, a sympathetic and resilient young girl. As a teen herself, filming her third movie, she’s remarkably natural within these unsure shoes.

This was a film that was consistently playing in my home, and I’ve got every scene memorized. From Lydia’s initial reluctance to her family’s new move, to the spirited girl who dances in the air at the end, finding life within death, Ryder shines.

Beetlejuice (1988) – source: Warner Bros.

Edward Scissorhands is one of the most beautifully heartbreaking tales of love and loneliness. A fairy tale by all accounts, the magical story, enchanting visuals and enigmatic cast make it one of Burton’s best. With her opening scene, playing an elderly grandmother telling the story, she takes us through the film, our guide yet again. As the gentle Kim, Winona is a skeptic and yet a romantic, changing over the course of the film as she learns more about Johnny Depp’s Edward.

Scissorhands, as a love-story, always manages to make me sob and also…laugh (primarily at Alan Arkin). Burton captures the close-mindedness of suburbia keenly, nurturing the story of this fish out of water with careful precision. And at the center? Dancing in the snow from Edward’s sculpture, a moment of frivolous joy within a harsh reality?

Winona Ryder.

She’s also a voice in Burton’s Frankenweenie about a boy who brings back his dead dog (though he’s not quite the same). Even her voice, as Elsa Van Helsing, is a valuable asset.

Young And Wild

Little Women (Gillian Armstrong)

As aspiring author Jo, Winona Ryder was the tomboy of the family of girls. Based on the classic novel by Louisa May Alcott, this film adaptation takes a wonderfully assembled ensemble cast and captures this treasured tale. She’s also the star of the film, which included several talented women (Susan Sarandon, Kirsten Dunst, Claire Danes), and she received an Oscar nomination for best actress.

Little Women (1994) – source: Columbia Pictures

During the American Civil War in Massachusetts this group of women, the March sisters, as the patriarch is off at war, struggle through youth and life and love. It’s ripe with sugary sentiments, tender moments, and a wonderful and inspiring performance by Ryder.
The charming young Christian Bale helps matters too.

I’ve watched it every Christmas that I can remember, and it’s that homey, warm kind of movie. As a young girl, Winona Ryder’s spirited portrayal made me want to seek out my own story. When she finds her way, and realizes her heart lies with Gabriel Byrne, c’mon, it’ll make your heart burst.

Heathers (Michael Lehmann)

This contemptuous satire didn’t pull any punches when it came to portraying its cast of mean girls as detestable, or when it came to giving Christian Slater‘s character full room to reign in terror. While this film is hilarious at times, it would undoubtedly never be made today, and so it’s frozen in the 1980’s where we can enjoy it without guilt.

Winona Ryder belongs to a group of bitchy teens who terrorize the school. The others are all Heathers (though she’s not one herself), and it’s clear from the beginning that this intelligent (used to be a geek) girl, Veronica Sawyer, isn’t completely enjoying her time here.

Heathers (1988) – source: New World Pictures

The new bad boy (Slater) catches her eye, and thus begins a murderous rampage with a kooky resonance. When the lead Heather (Kim Walker) is killed and they frame it as a suicide, things don’t turn out the way they expect. Their Bonnie and Clyde relationship hinders on sex and crime, and somehow it takes the entire movie for Ryder to realize he’s not going to stop.

It’s a black-comedy that gave her another opportunity to stand out and show her wide range. Her compelling performance amid the violence made the picture.

Reality Bites (Ben Stiller)

This Gen-x, 90’s lovefest, remains to this day – one of my quintessential rom-com’s. Directed by and starring Ben Stiller, Reality Bites follows a group of friends post-college graduation as they try to find their place. At the center is Lelaina Pierce (Winona Ryder), valedictorian, stuck in a job she dislikes. Her friends are played by Ethan Hawke, Steve Zahn, and Janeane Garofalo, who provide no shortage of hilarious commentary and quotable moments (specifically from Hawke.)

Lelaina is the kind of role you can’t help but love, and love is the predominate, recurring thread here. Even as things change, constrict, and her dreams seem out of reach, love – a choice between the responsible Michael (Stiller) and one of her best friends, slacker Troy (Hawke) – is the main thread of this rom-com yarn.

Reality Bites (1994) – source: Universal Pictures

She’s eccentric, but entirely watchable. Plus, there are some inspired moments. “Honey, all you have to be by the time you’re 23, is yourself.” Love it.

Mermaids (Richard Benjamin)

As Cher’s daughter, Winona Ryder tackled coming to age from a different perspective in Mermaids.

Based on the novel by Patty Dann, It is tough not to adore fifteen year old Charlotte Flax, who prays for god to keep her from temptation (I.E love and sex) while balancing her strange homelife. She’s embarrassed by her wild mother, the very opposite of her own intentions. The scenes shared with her sister (a young Christina Ricci) are warm and affable. While there’s no shortage of talent here, Ryder is specifically delightful.

Girl, Interrupted (James Mangold)

In her pixie haircut glory starring opposite the enigmatic Angelina Jolie (who won an Academy Award for the role), Ryder stars as Susanna Kaysen. Based on the book of the same name which chronicles the time the author spent in a mental institution, Girl, Interrupted gives us an interesting, sometimes comical, but instinctively heartbreaking glimpse into mental health.

After writer Susanna tries to kill himself she checks herself in for help. There’s a lot of fantastic actresses in this film, but one such stand-out is Lisa (Jolie). She comes on strong and works as a great ying to Susanna’s yang. They’re different but build a friendship anyway.

Girl, Interrupted (1999) – source: Columbia Pictures

James Mangold directs these two women; Jolie unruly and Ryder quaint. While RT might show critics are split on this picture, and while things get a bit murky towards the end (and the book might shine brighter), Interrupted gives us another solid performance from the star. As Susanna she’s very vulnerable, and naive about her own mental health. Through the course of the film and her eventual understanding, we see the changes through Ryder’s compelling take.

It is also worth mention that in Jim Jarmusch’s Night on Earth, Winona Ryder plays the tough cab driver Corky. Though the film is told in vignettes and hers is just one, her interactions with her customer, Gena Rowlands, whose character is the exact opposite, are both funny and refreshing. As Corky, she’s not trying to impress anyone here, but her performance definitely does.

A Different Time, A Familiar Face

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola)

There is a fine level between just enough and too much, and Bram Stoker’s Dracula finds it. It runs the risk of being over the top and yet gives us a fresh take on the classic. This 1992 Francis Ford Coppola film featured an epic performance by Gary Oldman as Dracula, a memorable turn as Van Helsing with Anthony Hopkins, and a beautiful and torn Winona Ryder (playing two characters) – the beating heart. As Mina Murray and Elisabeta she’s the beginning and end of the titular character, making his transformation to the prince of darkness stem from a human place.

The love-story between her and Dracula is achingly sad, but also satisfying. I’ve always loved the score, Coppola’s intimidating choice of aesthetics and a villain that wasn’t entirely horrific. There’s a part of his character that makes him sympathetic, in large part because of Ryder and her keen fragility.

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) – source: Columbia Pictures

The Crucible (Nicholas Hytner)

Undoubtedly you know the story. In fact, you probably read it in high school like me. I can’t say that I’m enraptured by the adaptation, but as the seventeen year old who accuses another of witchcraft, it’s hard to deny Winona Ryder’s keen talent on all spectrums of characters. This frenzied story of the Salem Witch Trials is based on Arthur Miller‘s book (with a screenplay penned by him as well).

As the scorned Abigail Williams, this isn’t a likable role. She points the finger on someone else, to save her own skin, but her choice of victims? Well, the man John Proctor (Daniel Day-Lewis) she had an affair with, and his wife Elizabeth (Joan Allen). Is it envy, spite? Take your pick. She’s vengeful, and she wears its well.

Age of Innocence (Martin Scorsese)

Winona Ryder received her first Oscar nomination for best supporting actress for the role. As Daniel Day-Lewis’s wife (the two would meet again in Crucible) May, the film may focus on his romance with Michelle Pfeiffer, but May doesn’t let you forget her. She’s tricky; bouncing back and forth between doe-eyed and manipulative depending on the circumstance. I think it’s an understated performance (yes, I know, she got a nomination) but when discussing the film she’s often left out of conversation (in my experience).

She’s not at the epicenter of a great romance, merely on the sidelines here, but what she does – she does well.

A Scanner Darkly (Richard Linklater)

This whacky science fiction romp (adapted from a Philip K. Dick story) from Richard Linklater had Ryder pairing with her Dracula co-star Keanu Reeves once more. In this futuristic tale most of society is hooked on the mysterious Substance D, and Reeves is an undercover agent sent to investigate. Ryder plays his girlfriend, also an addict, who in turn – isn’t who she seems by the end. It is an intriguing role for her to play, and between the unique animation and drug-fueled ride, this film highlights her with another engrossing performance.

Supporting Roles

Black Swan (Darren Aronofsky)

Black Swan (2010) – source: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Though Natalie Portman was truly the star of Black Swan, who could forget Winona’s turn as the resentful, older, ballet dancer. It’s brief, but her unbalanced portrayal, tear-soaked makeup and all, reverberates through the remainder of the film.

The Experimenter (Michael Almereyda)

This film follows psychologist Stanley Milgran (Peter Sarsgaard), who did radical experiments at Yale University in the 1960’s. The tests would follow a human’s willingness to obey, even when they shouldn’t. As Stanley’s wife, Sasha, Ryder plays the character with a lovely sensitivity, that befits the film well.

The Iceman (Ariel Vromen)

This based on a true story movie about a hired killer is another opportunity to relish Michael Shannon‘s significant talent. His character who is also a family man, having a duplicitous life, makes for an absorbing premise. His wife is played by Ryder. It’s a chilling story, and as his clueless wife, she brings her own sort of strength to an unforgettable real life thriller.

Stranger Things (Matt Duffer, Ross Duffer)

You’d be hard pressed to find someone who hasn’t heard, if not fallen in love with Stranger Things. It encapsulates ’80s fan lore of movies like ET and The Goonies and provides us with a new group of lovable kids looking to save their town.

Stranger Things (2016) – source: Netflix

As Joyce Byers, Winona Ryder is resilient, completely consumed (sometimes to the point of seeming insane) by the need to find her son Will (Noah Schnapp) after he goes missing. The first season revolves around his disappearance, as well as the mysterious appearance of Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown), who becomes close with Will’s friends. Along with having two sons, she has a consistent motherly touch to all of the children, especially Eleven. It’s a different side to the actress, and she’s perfect in the role.

With a mostly teenage cast, the adults, specifically her and David Harbour’s chief Hopper, whom seem to have a romance brewing (even if they want to deny it) are left to level the age playing field, keeping a firm grasp on the narrative. Her sincerity, not to mention the palpable love she has for her children, shows that Stranger Things is a great avenue to show off her talent.

A quick round up of some of her other supporting parts:

She also had a co-starring role in two comedies, Mr. Deeds and The Dilemma, neither of which were hits. In each she showed her aptitude for comedy, even if these weren’t the greatest vehicles to show it. Also, she’s got a small role in The Private Lives of Pippa Lee, a film that I feel is woefully overlooked. In Alien: Resurrection, she embodied the newest synth in the series, and had great chemistry with Sigourney Weaver. She played Spock’s mother in Star Trek for a short, but emotional time. Though Oscar Isaac might be the prominent figure in the miniseries Show me a Hero, all of the supporting characters, including Winona, are extraordinary.

What’s Next?

Next month she’ll be reunited with Keanu Reeves once again for their fourth film together, the romantic comedy Destination Wedding. Not to mention the third season of Stranger Things, set to premiere in 2019. She’s quite busy, and I’m excited to see what comes next!

What do you think? Any Winona roles I didn’t mention (there are many that I didn’t) that you love? Let us know in the comments below!

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What Is Winona Ryder’s Net Worth and How Did Breaking Up With Johnny Depp Almost Kill Her?

Actress Winona Ryder at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival | Chelsea Lauren/Getty Images for Sundance

Stranger Things star and 1980s icon Winona Ryder is experiencing a career resurgence thanks to the Netflix series. The actress burst onto the Hollywood scene in 1986 playing Rina in the feel-good film, Lucas. From there, Ryder’s star only grew brighter as a film favorite, quickly becoming an indie star.

She’s worked steadily since her film debut in Lucas but trended toward smaller projects in the last 15 years. As a result, she’s built a solid fortune of $18 million, Celebrity Net Worth reports. Like most career paths, Ryder’s journey was not linear, often paved with heartbreak and missteps. Which included a shocking event that followed her infamous breakup with actor Johnny Depp.

Her career launched after she fell in love

Ryder got noticed quickly after her role in Lucas, which led to parts in films like Great Balls of Fire, Beetlejuice, and Heathers. But life took a turn for Ryder when she met Depp at the Great Balls of Fire premiere in the late 1980s.

Ryder went onto star opposite of Depp in Tim Burton’s Edward Scissorhands, which is when the couple fell madly in love. “There’s been nothing in my 27 years that’s comparable to the feeling I have with Winona,” Depp told People. The couple’s romance took off like a house on fire as they got engaged after only five months of dating. At the time Ryder was just a teenager.

Ryder’s career shifted after her breakup with Depp

Winona Ryder and Johnny Depp in Edward Scissorhands | Source: Fox

During their whirlwind romance, Ryder made films which included Mermaids with Cher, Night on Earth and Bram Stroker’s Dracula. Depp was famously brandishing his “Winona Forever” tattoo and the couple seemed happy. However, the young couple could not sustain the relationship and split in 1993. Why? “They’re young, and they grew apart,” Ryder’s spokeswoman told People.

Ryder continued to work, appearing in Gen X celebrated film, Reality Bites and period film, The Age of Innocence. She also starred and was the executive producer of Girl, Interrupted. Actress Angelina Jolie won an Oscar, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award for her supporting role as Lisa.

Breaking with up Depp resulted in this scare

Ryder admits after her breakup with Depp, she was lost and in need of a break. “I had just done Dracula and Edward Scissorhands. I had just had my first real break-up, the first heartbreak,” she told Elle, People reports.

She says she “was very depressed after breaking off my engagement with Johnny. I was embarrassingly dramatic at the time, but you have to remember I was only 19 years old,” she told Cinema.com. Things became so “dramatic” that she fell asleep with a cigarette in her hand and woke up in flames, InStyle reports.

She continued to build her career

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It’s called a Joyce Byers appreciation post.

A post shared by Stranger Things (@strangerthingstv) on Nov 28, 2017 at 2:12pm PST

Despite retreating from the public eye, Ryder continued to build her portfolio and her life. This included more films like Mr. Deeds, A Scanner Darkly and Black Swan. Ryder also made a number of appearances in indie shorts and television shows like Friends and Strangers with Candy.

She also made news, but not for her career or romances. In 2001, she was arrested for shoplifting $5,500 worth of merchandise, The Huffington Post reports. She was found guilty but did not serve jail time.

Ryder has since “returned to the 1980s” as the terrorized mother, Joyce Byers in the smash hit Netflix series, Stranger Things. The series returns to Netflix for season three in July 2019.

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30 years since the second-best Tim Burton movie. ‘LOL, isn’t Burton such a joke?’ Don’t pick on my friend, assholes.
It just seems so much easier and more useful to simply ignore Burton’s bad movies – of which there are admittedly many – and appreciate that he’s here, or at least that he used to be; doing his part to comfort and enliven the suburban kids who crave something strange and supernatural to slash through the whole routine experience; tapping into the need for powerful images, sinister images, incoherent images, images that revel in a sensual attraction to the quirky ghoulishness within that exists both because of and in spite of a complacency that you know, not so deep down, you’d rather keep, in order to enjoy the escapist pleasures it affords. These are fantasies of a livelier world without the guilt of not actually participating in the liveliness. (‘This is my art and it is dangerous! You think I wanna die like this?!?’) I dunno, does the art-goth look really bother that many people? Personally I’d rather see a lot more suburban kids looking like Lydia or Edward than, err…whatever those crazy kids are looking like these days. Grrr, damn kids! Actually in my experience the Burtonesque kids were very sweet and kept to their obsessions without hurting anyone: pursuing personal visions through the privilege of being able to imbibe all this strange entertainment, only to go outside and witness nothing even remotely like it. And the hollow guilt that compels you back to that all-consuming entertainment — and maybe to create your own disruptions.
Burton’s work since Dark Shadows mostly just makes you wonder why he’d even want to work that often; there’s no joy or motion evident. But even before his casual admirers decided to fully turn against him – ’round about Alice in Wonderland time – he’d clocked many duds. Aside from the obvious failures that everyone pretty much agrees on – Mars Attacks!, Planet of the Apes, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – there’s far too much routine nonsense in his Batmans (hot take: Mask of the Phantasm is the best Batman movie) and yeah I know a lot of people still maintain that the magical realism of Big Fish is really beautiful and profound in so many magical heartfelt fantastical special little ways, but that movie was B-minus from the get-go: slack and enervating sentimentalism with a mawkish script that felt like a Burton prestige picture designed to win Oscars and be ‘appreciated’; segmented so generically and rigidly into segments of roughly equal levels of wafting kook that all grow wearisome. The bleary early-’00s digital glow that ironically feels more like a series of still images than any kind of vibrating dream-screen, even a knowingly fake one. I guess if what you’re looking for out of Tim Burton is Field of Dreams, then yeah, Big Fish is the one for you. (Wouldn’t it be great if the place the baseball players in Field of Dreams were going when they vanished into the cornfield was the waiting room in Beetlejuice?) Conversely, Alice in Wonderland in retrospect isn’t nearly as bad as we all made it out to be; oh sure, it’s really annoying and deadening in spots and outright stupid in others, but it’s not nearly as flatly ‘ugly’ as we all initially pounced on it for being. There’s some unambiguously beautiful stuff in it, and the thematic ambition is admirable; what it was most guilty of was so obviously not being the fluid head-trip we were all geared up for at the start of this decade.
Beetlejuice takes a while to get going, or at least it seems to even though it’s not actually that much physical time at all (Wikipedia helpfully points out that ‘Roger Ebert gave the film two out of four stars, writing that he “would have been more interested if the screenplay had preserved their sweet romanticism and cut back on the slapstick”.’ Yeah, isn’t that we’re all looking for? More sweet-tempered Alec Baldwin-Geena Davis banter in our Beetlejuice?), and the climax is paced all wrong, a dead screen, until Lydia summons Beetlejuice. But it’s no trial to coast through the uneven parts to arrive at the rewards; rewards of such quirky pain and pleasure and zaniness are rare (in the suburbs especially), and their endearing artifice – Caligari hallways, Harryhausen monsters, William Castle-esque jolts, even a touch of sci-fi giant-monster imagery with that fly in the model cemetery – ensures the fantasy doesn’t appear as a fantasy; that in a world as crazy to create this, it’s really happening. (‘O-kay — I believe you!’) Credit not only Burton but the great physicality of all the performers and especially the convergence of the apparently-heavily-worked-out script by Michael McDowell (I seem to remember a McDowell short story about a zombie-Beetlejuice character who at one point casually rams someone’s head through a faucet) and the genius comic improv of Michael Keaton, who…look, it’s no insult to say that Keaton will never be better than this. Spitting in his own coat to save for later, dancing up the strip club with a ball of spikes sticking out of him, everything he does with his arms — deathless work. Winona Ryder will likewise never top herself as Lydia (again, no insult to her), the epitome of the bored outcast suburban dream logic laughing quietly in the corner. And Danny Elfman’s score is one of his best, pleasurably frantic but not intrusive, functioning like a Carl Stalling score – those plucked strings and harps and weird glassy textures sound great! – while Burton of course matches it with a Chuck Jones sensibility: practical effects that expand on the delightful ones in Pee-wee’s Big Adventure – I’ll never get tired of that bulging-eyed Large Marge effect, never – and with the cheap green-screening that makes it not only more endearing but somehow more believable. The bannister snake with its curling lip, the adorable shrunken head. The supernatural is made to seem so much more healthy than the greyed-out world of the market, so when Lydia floats into the air in the last scene, it’s like, oh thank God! That’s what this is all about! One feels a liveliness at death and the absurd things you can make out of this limbo, and to spite all the haters I hope Tim Burton takes some comfort in the knowledge that his visions will still be alive and well long after those of the Von Triers and Aronofskys – hell, even the talented Gilliams – have crumbled into dust. In that waiting room I just laugh and laugh and laugh….
Pee-wee’s Big Adventure – B+
Beetlejuice – A
Batman – B–
Edward Scissorhands – B
Batman Returns – B–
Ed Wood – A+
Mars Attacks! – C+
Sleepy Hollow – B
Planet of the Apes – D+
Big Fish – B–
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – C
Corpse Bride – B–
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street – A–
Alice in Wonderland – B
Dark Shadows – C–
Frankenweenie – C
Big Eyes – B–
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – CPublished

COSTUME CONTEST RULES

Get tickets to a Thursday performance during the month of October and enter the in-person costume contest.

Head to the 7th Avenue side of the theatre (between 50th St. and 51st St.) starting 45 minutes before the performance to get a photo of your costume taken by a BEETLEJUICE staff member – group costumes are welcome! Be ready to show your tickets to the BEETLEJUICE staff member.

The costumes will be judged during the performance, and the winner will be announced on-stage during the curtain call. After the performance, the winner(s) will go backstage and get a photo taken with a cast member.

Follow these rules (or you’re dead to us).
Contest entries will be accepted between 6:15:00 pm ET and 6:45 pm ET on October 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 2019. Entries may include groups of up to six (6) people. Every person entered into the contest, including members of a group, must provide proof of their ticket to that evening’s performance. Entries must not include content from Beetlejuice the movie. Costumes may not obstruct the view of another audience member, and must fit within the reasonable boundaries of your seat. No simulated, costume or functional weapons are allowed at BEETLEJUICE the Musical. Full-face masks are also prohibited. Hate speech (in any language) is not permitted on attire or props. Shoes must be worn at all times. No nudity. Judging criteria: originality/creativity (40%), adherence to the creative world of BEETLEJUICE the Musical (40%) and overall quality of costume(s) (20%).