This is us smoke detector

The ‘This Is Us’ Smoke Detector Clue Could Give Jack’s Death Another Devastating Twist

It’s been a slow burn (pun intended) for This Is Us viewers to finally see how Jack dies. Well, dear viewers, it must be coming soon, because in “Clooney,” the Jan. 16 episode of This Is Us (supervising producer: Vera Herbert), one piece of the “how did Jack die” puzzle is revealed. Yes, it’s a minor detail, but one that could have changed the Pearsons’ lives forever — did the smoke detector cause Jack’s death on This Is Us? An infuriatingly simple mistake could cost him his life.

Viewers have known since the beginning of Season 2 that Jack Pearson perishes in a fire or something to do with a fire. We have the foundation and framing of this Big Three construction house, and we’re putting up sheetrock and filling in the exact details of his demise. And it’s hard, y’all, mostly because the Pearsons are currently on the precipice of something great — Jack wants to start Big Three Construction again, and his dear, loving wife, Rebecca, is behind him finding his passion. Anything, probably, to keep him on the wagon. But after a hectic day at the mall, the Pearson family, who has been dealing with Kate finding a dress and Miguel mourning his marriage and Kevin being a sour puss, forgets to buy batteries for the smoke detector. The smoke detector that maybe, possibly, potentially could have notified the family earlier that the house was on fire and saved Jack’s life.

Giphy

It’s important to note that viewers don’t know exactly that Jack died in the fire — in the Season 2 premiere, Rebecca is driving Jack’s belongings back in their car, and his personal artifacts aren’t burnt. He is seemingly dead, because her grief fills the screen, and the house is in flames, but correlation does not necessarily mean causation in this case. In a recent interview with Us Weekly, Milo Ventimiglia, who plays Jack, hinted more at what’s to come. “I think people have seen what’s contributed to his death, possibly. But… no one’s guessed it yet.” So… Jack doesn’t go up in smoke? And when asked if Jack’s substance abuse issues had anything to do with his demise, Ventimiglia said, “Maybe. Sure. Maybe not. Sure.” Oh, he’s playing coy! But Ventimiglia did say that answers will come soon. “I am happy to know that the audiences are thinking about it and wondering, but I just keep telling everyone ‘just wait.’ The answers will be here very, very, very, very, very, very soon.”

After the fire (assuming both scenes take place on the same night) Kevin, cast still on, is with Sophie. Randall and Kate are at Miguel’s house with Randall’s redheaded girlfriend, Allison, and Kate’s dog, Louie. Kate has always blamed herself for her father’s death, and some theories have suggested that Louie could have been the reason Jack died — he ran into a burning house to get that dog for Kate. This is a feasible theory, especially because if the smoke detector had done its job and gone off, there should have been enough time to gather up family members — four-legged and not — without Jack having to run back in to save Louie.

But, this smoke detector snafu shifts the blame, pushing it further back, to Jack and Rebecca. If Jack and Rebecca had remembered to put batteries in that detector, they could have had more time to get out of the house and Jack wouldn’t have had to run in, presumably for Louie. Well, technically it would be Jack’s fault entirely, since Rebecca asked him to remind her about the batteries and he… didn’t. Devastating. Still, the smoke detector could absolve Kate of any perceived guilt, all while reminding us that sometimes a mistake is a mistake. Some just have deadly consequences. (Check your smoke detectors, y’all.)

If all of this speculation is driving you, dear viewer and reader, up the wall, you’re not alone. Everyone wants to know, and the cast is OK with it. In an interview with Vulture, Ventimiglia said, “I know it’s not a gross fascination where people just want to see a man die. They have an itch to scratch, and they want to know what happened to this man and how that moment in time can change and affect the people he loves the most and that love him the most.” That’s all well and good, but he’s not giving any details up (even on the smoke detector). “It would be bad-form storytelling on our end if we were to just give it away right at the beginning,” he said.

So I guess now we wait even longer for answers on This Is Us, but keep your eye on that smoke detector. It could unlock the whole mystery.

The Fire Alarm On ‘This Is Us’ Is The Biggest Clue About Jack’s Death So Far

The moment every This Is Us fan has been waiting for/dreading is officially about to happen, as Tuesday night’s new episode hinted in the last couple of seconds. Viewers have been anticipating the family drama to reveal how Jack died ever since the first episode, and now it finally looks like we are going to get some answers. The latest new episode of This Is Us ended with a fire alarm cliffhanger that pretty much assures eagle-eyed fans that Jack’s death is going to happen in the next couple of episodes. Spoiler alert: Don’t read on until you have seen Season 2 Episode 12 of This Is Us, entitled “Clooney.”

Following the explosive revelations in the Pearson family therapy session last week, This Is Us found the Big Three picking up the pieces and attempting to move forward in “Clooney.” Kevin moved back in with his mom and learned a bit more about Rebecca and Miguel’s relationship, Kate threw herself back into wedding planning and may have made a new friend while dress shopping, and Randall learned a bit more about William’s life and may have stumbled upon a new career for himself and Beth in the process.

This is all well and good, but the real kicker came in the last few seconds of the episode, as we saw Jack and Rebecca relaxing on their couch in the flashback storyline. After a family trip to the mall when the kids were teenagers, Jack and Rebecca sit down and wonder if they forgot to pick something up. As the camera zooms out, it becomes clear what they forgot to buy: a battery for their fire detector. The last image of the episode is a disconnected fire alarm hanging useless on the Pearson family ceiling… a clear indication to viewers that the house fire that many have speculated killed Jack is on the horizon.

Obviously, that disconnected fire detector was the real red flag that Jack’s death is about to happen, but the episode gave us a few other clues as well. In the present-day storyline, Kate revealed that she began to lose weight right before her father’s death, and sure enough, it was during that family trip to the mall in the past that we see she is fitting into smaller dress sizes. Also, we know that Kevin had a cast on his leg when the fire happened, which he is now newly sporting in his past storyline. After all these teases, I would honestly expect the house fire to happen in the next episode, or maybe the episode after if they can find some way to draw it out even more.

The big question now is whether or not that house fire is the thing that actually killed Jack. When the details of the fire were first revealed at the start of Season 2, it felt pretty obvious to most fans that it must have been the event that killed Jack, but there have been other theories that allege the fire may be a fake-out and Jack actually died shortly after the house fire. Milo Ventimiglia seemed to confirm that the fire may only be one piece of Jack’s death in a new interview with Us Weekly:

I think people have seen what’s contributed to his death, possibly. But no, no one’s guessed it yet.

Even if Jack didn’t die in the house fire, it definitely seems like the fire was a major part of his death in one way or another — we will all know the truth soon enough. Ventimiglia also confirmed that the big reveal is incredibly close:

The answers will be here very, very, very, very, very, very soon.

The other thing to consider is how many episodes This Is Us has left in Season 2. “Clooney” was the 12th of the 18-episode season, meaning that the show has six more episodes to tie it all up. Of course, you would assume that it would save Jack’s death reveal for the season finale, but it really does feel like the flashback storyline is just getting so, so close to the house fire that it might not be able to be drawn out much more. Expect to learn what actually went down with Jack Pearson very soon.

The Smoke Detector Clue On ‘This Is Us’ Is A Crucial Detail To How Jack Died

Watching the multi-generation story of the Pearson family on This Is Us has shown viewers that, in life, it really is the little things that matter. And it’s the little things that can sometimes change the course of history. Take, for instance, the smoke detector clue on This Is Us, which adds yet another big detail to how Jack died, since it’s likely not going to be as simple as perishing in a house fire. In Tuesday’s episode “Clooney,” one of the first scenes featured was from the past, which showed Rebecca asking Jack to remind her to buy batteries when they take the kids to the mall. It’s something so harmless and easy for viewers to overlook. (I, myself, almost did.) Initially, it doesn’t seem like forgetting such a small item would signify a life or death situation, but again, it’s the little things — and these batteries turn out to be very important.

Then, at the end of the episode, Rebecca asked Jack if they forgot anything they needed at the mall, to which he innocently replied that no, they didn’t. But then the camera panned up to the smoke detector, which clearly had no new batteries inside of it. In fact, it clearly had no batteries in it at all. While at first it was unclear what the batteries were even for or if they were important, by the end of the episode, you know that they were meant for the smoke detector. And since we all know that by the time Jack dies on This Is Us, the house is a shell of what it used to be thanks to a house fire, this might be one of the biggest details about Jack’s death and the house fire that we’ve seen yet.

Based on everything we know so far, it’s safe to say that Jack’s death is somehow connected to the house fire. Whether he died in the fire itself or died later due to fire-related injuries (i.e. smoke inhalation) remains unclear. But the fire definitely plays a huge factor, which makes the absence of a working smoke detector all the more relevant.

The point of a smoke detector is to alert you of a fire before it spreads too much or gets out of control, but if the smoke detector in their house didn’t even have batteries, then the fire could spread a substantial amount before Jack is able to get everyone out of the house. This means that Jack suffering from smoke inhalation is very possible. Of course, this one small detail about the house fire on This Is Us doesn’t tell viewers everything, but it’s definitely an important clue. It also supports some of the theories that have already been circulating about Jack’s death.

Time.com wrote about a theory that suggested that Jack died after the fire rather than in the fire, especially since at his funeral, Kevin didn’t seem to have a cast or crutches even though he did shortly before the events that led to the fire. According to the theory, “Maybe Jack was injured in the fire and was taken to the hospital, where he later died of complications due to smoke inhalation or something similar.”

Reddit user Loversinner posted a similar theory that mentioned smoke inhalation as a possibility, but added another twist to it: “What if doesn’t die in the fire or due to smoke inhalation, literally? What if he heroically runs into the fire for whatever reason, is hospitalized for smoke inhalation, and while he’s being treated for it, they find a preexisting condition of sorts, perhaps Cirrhosis?”

It’s going to be a little while longer before we know everything about Jack’s death and the events that led up to it, but the smoke detector clue is just one more big piece of the puzzle.

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The crockpot is one of the most amazing tools in the kitchen! By the time dinner rolls around I am so tired I don’t want to cook! I love to prep a meal in the morning (or even weeks before and freeze it) and then toss it in the crockpot and dinner is done!

But there are some things about the crockpot that are less than ideal. Here are a few crockpot accessories you didn’t know you needed!!

11 Crockpot Accessories You Didn’t Know You Needed

1)Shredder Claws – You know what hurts my hands? Using forks to try and shred the meat in the crock pot! These have a comfortable handle and will quickly and easily shred the meat without hurting your hands!

2)Slow Cooker Liners – The only reason I don’t use my crockpot every day is because of the cleanup. Problem solved! These liners are convenient and totally worth it!

3)Travel Bag – There is nothing worse than traveling with a crockpot. Especially if you don’t have one of the newfangled ones with straps or clips to keep the lid on! This bag makes it clean and easy to travel with your crockpot and it will hold the heat in!

4)Gravy Warmer – What a fun idea! I love to make homemade gravy and if you don’t have somewhere good to put it the gravy congeals and gets icky. This gravy warmer is perfect for setting on your table and keeping the gravy warm and keeping it at that perfect texture! No more waiting until the last minute for holidays to prepare the gravy. Make it ahead and keep it ready in this handy gadget!

5)Heat Resistant Oven Mitts – Yup I will admit it, I burn myself on my crockpot at least once each time I use it! Yup I am slightly klutzy and obviously my memory is not that great…but now with these awesome mitts I can crockpot in safety without burning my hands or wrists!

6)Baggy Rack – This one is definitely a must for all those crockpot leftovers! I have a big crockpot and you should see me trying to lift it and pour the leftovers into a plastic baggy. Ha not pretty! This little guy holds the baggy open so you can use both hands to hold the heavy crockpot and get the leftovers put away quickly and without a big mess.

7)Microwavable Food Container – Why not make an extra big crockpot meal and store the leftovers in these handy containers to take to work for lunch? These microwavable containers are perfect for your lunchbox so you can take something healthy that you made at home in your crockpot to work rather than eating out! Save yourself some calories and some money!

8) Tall Tupperware Container – It’s not what you think! Use the tupperware container to prop up your bags – This is especially helpful for soupy liquids that you are freezing. Check out all the recipes – to die for – from Pretty as a Peach – many of these are made with your crockpot!

9) Make your crockpot into a broiler… sorta. This is great if you are cooking meats and do not want the fat to soak into your meats. This rack gently lifts your food just an inch or two off the bottom of your crockpot!

10) Crock Pot Lid Lock – Please tell me I am not the only person who has had this struggle and discovered a puddle under the crockpot during transport? Last Thanksgiving we took a pothole and the gravy spilled. I wish I had a contraption like this to lock the lid in place! It also comes with a ladel! It’s ready to bring to a potluck!

11) Canning Set. If you use your crockpot to can (I do) you will love this collection of gizmos! All the things you need to can (except for the food and the cans)!

Best Tips for Your Crockpot

Check out our collection of Thanksgiving Food Ideas.

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Crock-Pot never asked for this. All Crock-Pot wanted to do was cook our food, slowly, while we were away. Crock-Pot was only trying to make our lives a little easier. But now . . . now, despite its wholesome intentions, Crock-Pot has found itself in the middle of a scandal.

On Tuesday, This Is Us finally revealed the cause of Jack Pearson’s long-teased demise. Spoiler alert: a faulty slow cooker set the house on fire. Naturally, the response to this twist on social media has been swift and hyperbolic. People have begun casting suspicious glances at their own Crock-Pots, which suddenly look a little more . . . insidious. Are they planning something, we wonder?

This Is Us creator Dan Fogelman tried to quell viewers’ paranoia on Twitter, writing after the episode aired that he wanted to take a moment to remind us that the machine responsible for murdering the World’s Greatest Dad “was a 20 year old fictional crockpot with an already funky switch? Let’s not just lump all those lovely hardworking crockpots together.” Alas, it seems his words were not enough; on Wednesday, Crock-Pot was prompted to release an official statement in which it promised, seriously, that your Crock-Pot won’t kill you.

“Crock-Pot understands the concerns brought up by last night’s episode of This Is Us, and we, too, are heartbroken by the latest development in Jack’s story line,” the lengthy and deathly, deathly earnest statement begins. “However, it is important that our consumers understand and have confidence that all Crock-Pot slow cookers exceed all internal testing protocols and all applicable industry safety standards and regulations as verified by independent third-party testing labs. For nearly 50 years, with over 100 million Crock-Pots sold, we have never received any consumer complaints similar to the fictional events portrayed in last night’s episode. In fact, the safety and design of our product renders this type of event nearly impossible.

“In addition, and most relevant to the concerns consumers are having after watching the recent This Is Us episode, our Crock-Pot slow cookers are low current, low wattage (typically no more than 200 or 300 watts) appliances with self-regulating, heating elements. The product is designed to cook foods over a longer period of time at low temperatures and the switches connect to only one side of the power line voltage, so there is never a high voltage applied directly across our switches. The switches within our slow cookers are subjected to additional internal testing, which includes a Rotary Knob Endurance test, Rotary Knob Force Test and Flame Burning Test, and constructed of self-extinguishing, flame resistant material.

“Our hope is that the team at NBC’s This Is Us will help us spread factual information regarding our product’s safety. While we know their primary mission is to entertain—something they have continued to excel in—we also feel they have a responsibility to inform. Just like many fans, we will be watching next week’s episode to see how Jack’s story progresses and, regardless of the outcome, we want consumers first and foremost to know they are safe when using their Crock-Pot.”

Will next week’s post-Super Bowl episode include a brief primer on fire safety and the rigorous standards to which Crock-Pots are held? Probably not—but then again, Sterling K. Brown can turn just about any material into Emmy bait, so perhaps he’d be up to the challenge. Barring that, we’re guessing the episode will keep its focus on the exact circumstances surrounding Jack’s death—with a coda, perhaps, about how the Pearson family never, ever ate chili again.

22 Movies and TV Shows That Will Save Us in 2018

1 / 15Chevron Chevron By John P. Johnson/HBO. Westworld (Season 2) HBO is once again hoping you’ll ignore the big Game of Thrones-shaped hole in its schedule and turn your attention back to the sci-fi mind game that is Westworld. The Emmy-nominated series, starring Evan Rachel Wood and Thandie Newton, is ready to confound you once again in its second season. Until its spring 2018 premiere, take a trip back in time and revisit nine burning questions we still have about the finale.

One year after Jack’s death on This Is Us, the slow cooker defends itself

NBC type

  • TV Show

Network

  • NBC

Genre

One year ago today, there was great mourning in the land of This Is Us. After 15 months of anticipation, crazy theories, and flat-out dread, prime time’s biggest morbid mystery was finally resolved when the NBC family drama revealed in its post-Super Bowl episode that Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) died both a hero’s death and a quiet one, expiring in the hospital from cardiac arrest after he suffered smoke inhalation when he ran back into his burning home to save the family dog and stayed a bit longer to rescue some family possessions. Viewers could console themselves, of course, with the knowledge that Jack Pearson would live on, given this time-traveling family drama’s obsession with the past. But still, they cycled through anger, acceptance, and depression, assigning culpability to anyone/anything in Jack’s orbit. Here, we allow the kitchen appliance that received the brunt of the blame to defend itself.

Hey. Yeah, yeah, it’s me, This Is Us‘ Crock-Pot, er, slow cooker (let’s keep things nice and generic). I’m sure you came here expecting me to apologize for killing Jack Pearson — you know, “America’s dad” — after I sparked the house fire that led to his untimely death. But if you’ll switch off your boiling anger (or at least turn it down to low), I can explain.

Shouldn’t some blame be directed at that allegedly kind, old neighbor George, who gave me to Jack knowing that I had a faulty switch? Did he think about fixing me — or, better yet, putting me out of my misery so I didn’t have to make another batch of BBQ and grape jelly meatballs? (It’s a thing. Look it up on Pinterest.) Then there’s that surprisingly flammable dish towel that Jack placed me on. Was it soaked in kerosene? Or what about Kate, who tearfully told Jack that her dog was trapped inside the house, prompting him to play Superdad and race back into the fire?

And because we’re pointing fingers, let’s aim one at Rebecca, who forgot to buy batteries for the smoke detector, and Jack, who forgot to remind her to buy the batteries — and, of course, who also stopped inside the blaze to gather a few family possessions, which made him inhale even more smoke. And don’t get me started on the hospital doctor for not catching Jack’s faulty-heart issue. Fine, get me started — he sucks too. But until they make a two-season Netflix docuseries that exonerates me, I will remain your unfairly persecuted cooking appliance. And that really sets my blood to simmer.

Related content:

  • This Is Us producers explain why two actors were needed to play Nicky
  • This Is Us creator on finally revealing who ‘Her’ is, Randall and Beth’s future
  • This Is Us fall finale: Dan Fogelman explains that shocker about Jack’s brother Nicky

Episode Recaps

NBC’s beloved era-hopping drama tells the story of the Pearson family through the years.

type
  • TV Show
seasons
  • 4
Genre
  • Drama
Airs
  • Tuesdays at 9:00pm
Premiere
  • 09/20/16
creator
  • Dan Fogelman
Performers
  • Milo Ventimiglia,
  • Mandy Moore,
  • Justin Hartley,
  • Sterling K. Brown
Network
  • NBC
Complete Coverage
  • This Is Us
Available For Streaming On

The ‘This Is Us’ Crock-Pot Plot Twist Nobody Saw Coming [UPDATE]

Every Tuesday night, millions of Americans tune in to NBC to have their hearts ripped to shreds by This Is Us, a melodrama where one of the central plots revolves around the mysterious death of a loving father named Jack (played by Milo Ventimiglia). After dropping hints and clues about Jack’s death for nearly two seasons, last night’s episode “That’ll Be the Day” finally showed what happened the day before he met his demise. (Warning: Major spoilers herein.)

It’s Super Bowl Sunday, 1998, and Jack spends the afternoon having meaningful moments with his family, but ultimately he ends up by himself, clearing the remnants of his game day feast — part of it made with a Crock-Pot, which was used to cook chili.

NBC/This Is Us

Jack tosses some rags next to the Crock-Pot, and turns off his slow-cooker. The action then switches to a flashback of a neighbor giving Jack and his wife Rebecca (Mandy Moore) the old pot with a warning about its finicky switch.

NBC/This Is Us

The story then cuts back to the Crock-Pot on Super Bowl Sunday, 1998, which turns back on by itself and shoots off a spark that sets the rags on fire.

NBC/This Is Us

Flames begin to climb through the house and scenes of Jack and his family in happier times flash on the screen, then the credits roll. Fans will have to wait till the next episode — which will air immediately after Super Bowl Sunday, 2018 — for closure on Jack’s deadly game-day Crock-Pot incident.

Here’s a glimpse at how Twitter reacted to this major revelation last night:

Oh, just unplugging every last thing in my kitchen short of the fridge is all. https://t.co/mfT6x0JxWK

— Kat Kinsman (@kittenwithawhip) January 24, 2018

Me running to my kitchen to unplug my crockpot even tho I haven’t used it in weeks. Thanks #ThisIsUs pic.twitter.com/GKCvemNReP

— Bre (@breeezybre) January 24, 2018

To do list:
Call dad
Hug dogs
Cancel all super bowl plans, today and forevermore
Unplug all outlets
Buy Kleenex in bulk
Throw away crock pot
#ThisIsUs

— Alexandra Fernandez (@FERNalicious) January 24, 2018

Me watching the crockpot bring it all together #ThisIsUs pic.twitter.com/XZOS4rXjdl

— Katrina Savaglio (@SavaglioKatrina) January 24, 2018

Good luck to all the PR people working in the crockpot industry as they walk into the office tomorrow morning. #ThisIsUs

— nikki delamotte (@nikkidelamotte) January 24, 2018

And, of course, someone even started a Twitter account for the old Crock-Pot in question:

Why ya’ll mad at me? #ThisIsUs

— George’s Crockpot (@georgescrockpot) January 24, 2018

But sadly, there’s no response from the official Crock-Pot account yet.

UPDATE: A spokesperson for Crock-Pot sends along a statement regarding the incident on last night’s episode of This Is Us.

Crock-Pot understands the concerns brought up by last night’s episode of This Is Us, and we too are heartbroken by the latest development in Jack’s storyline. However, it is important that our consumers understand and have confidence that all Crock-Pot slow cookers exceed all internal testing protocols and all applicable industry safety standards and regulations as verified by independent third-party testing labs. For nearly 50 years, with over 100 million Crock-Pots sold, we have never received any consumer complaints similar to the fictional events portrayed in last night’s episode. In fact, the safety and design of our product renders this type of event nearly impossible.

In addition, and most relevant to the concerns consumers are having after watching the recent This Is Us episode, our Crock-Pot slow cookers are low current, low wattage (typically no more than 200 or 300 watts) appliances with self-regulating, heating elements. The product is designed to cook foods over a longer period of time at low temperatures and the switches connect to only 1 side of the power line voltage, so there is never a high voltage applied directly across our switches. The switches within our slow cookers are subjected to additional internal testing, which includes a Rotary Knob Endurance test, Rotary Knob Force Test and Flame Burning Test and constructed of self-extinguishing, flame resistant material.

Our hope is that the team at NBC’s This Is Us will help us spread factual information regarding our product’s safety. While we know their primary mission is to entertain – something they have continued to excel in – we also feel they have a responsibility to inform. Just like many fans, we will be watching next week’s episode to see how Jack’s story progresses and, regardless of the outcome, we want consumers first and foremost to know they are safe when using their Crock-Pot.

So maybe don’t throw that Crock-Pot out on the curb just yet.

• This Is Us
• All Pop Culture Coverage

As if viewers are not still reeling from the latest This Is Us reveal, the show just keeps reminding us of the heartbreak to come.

NBC released an episode highlight clip showing the final moments from the drama’s Jan. 23 episode, “That’ll Be The Day.”

The clip starts with Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) and teen Randall (Niles Fitch) have a heart-to-heart about Randall having his first kiss after going to see Titanic with his crush.

The scene then shows Jack cleaning the kitchen, doing the dishes and writing a note to Kevin (Logan Shroyer), set to the haunting tune of “To Build a Home ” by The Cinematic Orchestra and Patrick Watson.

The scene then jumps to the moment when Jack and Rebecca’s neighbors gift them with an old slow cooker. Back in the fateful night, the slow cooker sparks up and starts the fire that eventually takes Jack’s life.

The reveal caused an uproar from fans against Crock-Pot, which then provoked a response from the appliance company.

This Is Us cast and crew have been teasing the upcoming post-Super Bowl episode as the one where viewers will finally get the answers to how Jack lost his life.

“Questions will be answered in a very satisfying way,” This Is Us executive producer Isaac Aptaker told Entertainment Weekly. “It’s not necessarily what people expect, but people will have a lot of the answers they’ve been hoping for.”

“It is a very, very exciting episode,” he continued about the upcoming hour, appropriately titled, “Super Bowl Sunday.” “We shot it early, so we had extra time to make sure everything was perfect in editing. It was one of my favorite episodes we’ve ever done, and I think it’s really going to blow people away.”

This Is Us star Mandy Moore described the upcoming hour as a “soul-crusher.”

“I don’t know if people are going to be ready for the next episode. I’m not. I haven’t seen it yet,” Moore said. “I mean, I filmed it and it was really hard on every level. I think it’s … I think it’s gonna be a good soul-crusher.”

“Everything will be answered. We’re leaving nothing on the table. Everyone will know everything,” she said. “I’m excited about that, because I feel like it’ll sort of relieve a little bit of pressure. People will know, and then we’ll be able to get back to telling the story of this family, and I think it’ll make things that much more bittersweet moving forward too.”

‘This Is Us’ cast dish on show’s future

Caution: This post contains spoilers about the latest episode of NBC’s “This Is Us.”

Until this week, the Crock-Pot was nothing more than a hardworking kitchen appliance.

Now it’s a central plot point on the NBC’s hit show “This Is Us,” implicated in the death of the family’s beloved patriarch, Jack Pearson.

And Crock-Pot is on the defensive. It opened a Twitter account Wednesday to respond to angry fans, and it issued a lengthy statement defending its product and asking NBC for some help to correct the record.

Fans of “This Is Us” have waited two years to find out what killed Jack, played by Milo Ventimiglia. In the the final scene of Tuesday night’s episode viewers watch him clean the kitchen after a Super Bowl celebration. He’s careful to turn off the slow cooker used to prepare that night’s chili, while his wife, Rebecca (Mandy Moore) and kids are asleep upstairs, but after he leaves the room the pot shorts out and sets the house on fire. The final shot is Jack’s face when the blaze reaches his bedroom.

After the show, heartbroken fans on Twitter expressed their anger at the product for the death of the character.

“My mom just threw our crockpot out,” tweeted one user.

My mom just threw our crockpot out #ThisIsUs #SOSIMILAR pic.twitter.com/RmeXQrfog5

— Chelsea Stevens (@ChelseaMS731) January 24, 2018

The Crock-Pot brand didn’t have a Twitter account until this week, when it launched one to to address the outcry and assure fans of its product’s safety.

We’re trying to ease the 💔 but we know it’s hard. Seriously though, @CrockPotCares stands by the safety of our products. We saw that you recently started getting in the kitchen and we would love to send you one of our AMAZING slow cookers and our fave recipes ♥️.

— The Crock-Pot® Brand (@CrockPotCares) January 24, 2018

In a statement, a Crock-Pot spokesperson said it’s important that “consumers understand and have confidence that all Crock-Pot slow cookers exceed all internal testing protocols and all applicable industry safety standards and regulations.”

“Our hope is that the team at NBC’s ‘This Is Us’ will help us spread factual information regarding our product’s safety. While we know their primary mission is to entertain — something they have continued to excel in — we also feel they have a responsibility to inform,” the spokesperson said. “Just like many fans, we will be watching next week’s episode to see how Jack’s story progresses and, regardless of the outcome, we want consumers first and foremost to know they are safe when using their Crock-Pot.”

The spokesperson said the company has “never received any consumer complaints similar to the fictional events portrayed in episode.”

Newell Brands (NWL), which owns the Crock-Pot brand, also makes Rubbermaid, Yankee Candle and Sharpie products.

Crock-Pot was introduced to the masses in 1971 by the Rival Company, according to Smithsonian. It caught on in the 1970s as more number of women took on careers and needed to spend less time in the kitchen.

Slow cookers are now ubiquitous. While Crock-Pot is one many brands that makes the appliance, but it’s probably the best known. The slow cooker featured on Tuesday’s episode, for example, does not have the Crock-Pot branding.

Related: ‘This Is Us:’ Jack’s cause of death revealed and fans are heartbroken

The outrage online even compelled series creator Dan Fogelman, to tweet at fans about in defense of the appliance.

“Taking a moment to remind everyone that it was a 20 year old fictional crockpot with an already funky switch,” Fogelman tweeted. “Let’s not just lump all those lovely hardworking crockpots together.”

Taking a moment to remind everyone that it was a 20 year old fictional crockpot with an already funky switch? Let’s not just lump all those lovely hardworking crockpots together. #ThisIsUs

— Dan Fogelman (@Dan_Fogelman) January 24, 2018

The NBC drama is bringing in 15.6 million viewers overall this season and is the #1 entertainment show on broadcast TV in prime time’s key advertising demographic of adults 18-49.

If the backlash doesn’t die down soon, Crock-Pot may need NBC and “This Is Us” to intervene more vocally, said Andrew Gilman, founder of crisis communications firm CommCore Consulting Group.

“The show — which is so popular, and has won Emmys — may need to come to their defense,” he said.

CNNMoney (New York) First published January 25, 2018: 2:35 PM ET

The ‘This Is Us’ Crock-Pot Scene Has Jack Fans Everywhere Sobbing

Is someone cutting onions in here or something? Major SPOILERS ahead for This Is Us. The day fans have been waiting for is here — the cause of Jack’s death on This Is Us (or at least the cause of the fire that caused his death) has been revealed. I’m weeping, you’re weeping, everyone is weeping. The world’s best patriarch is about to meet his end. Of course, it’s all devastating, and Jack’s crock-pot fire on This Is Us left fans feeling extremely emotional.

Here’s what we knew about Jack’s death prior to the episode — he died as a result of a fire in 1998, when the kids were teens. Rebecca was wearing a Pittsburgh Steelers jersey, and she cried in her car when she pulled up to the remains of the house. Kate blames herself for her father’s death, and afterward, she and Randall were in Miguel’s house with a dog and Randall’s redheaded girlfriend. Kevin, with a broken leg, was off somewhere, making out with Sophie. In the Jan. 16 episode, “Clooney,” viewers saw that the smoke detector in the Pearson home was missing its batteries. (Were you kidding me with that shot, This Is Us? Brutal). Now, the rest of the picture has been completed. On Super Bowl Sunday, the very same slow cooker that was used to make game-day chili sparked a fire, causing the whole kitchen to go up in flames… then the living room… and then, the fire crept up the stairs. Of course, if the smoke alarm would have worked, this would have been less of a problem.

Again, I’m not crying. You’re crying. And the fans are crying, too. Let’s see what they have to say.

Many Have Sworn Off Their Slow Cookers

Yikes.

Some Are Not Emotionally Ready For The Next Episode

Neither am I, to be honest.

And No One Is Ready For The Super Bowl

Who wants to cry into all that guacamole, anyway?

Milo Ventimiglia, who plays Jack, and Mandy Moore, who plays Rebecca, have both teased the gut-wrenching event in previous weeks. Ventimiglia told US Weekly that fans should expect some pain at seeing Jack’s passing:

“I imagine that this one is going to hurt. It’s definitely going to hurt. In the short amount of time, people have really grown to love Jack. And Jack and Rebecca and the family and the kids, the adult big 3. And I think this is just one of those moments where you know it’s on its way. And it’s going to sting. It’s going to hurt. But I think ultimately, hopefully, people can accept and hold the memory of Jack with a full heart and move that into their lives.”

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Moore said that viewers should wait for Jack’s death but not lose sight of the big picture of the Pearson family. She said:

“I just think there are other elements of this family and their story unfolding that it’s fascinating and just as heartbreaking. That loss is something that has reverberated throughout the family and has affected everybody’s life in such a deep way. There are emotional ramifications that have already happened onscreen because of this death… I hope people aren’t missing some of the more nuanced parts of what the show is really about.”

The show is about the Pearsons and how they’ve managed to survive, sure, but I, personally, just can’t get over how different this family would have been if Jack would have lived. Probably wouldn’t be a television show about it, but it’s amazing how one moment can truly change everything. Now that the cause Jack’s death is revealed, This Is Us can focus on its torrent of consequences.

Warning: This post contains a massive spoiler for this week’s This Is Us.

Not all kitchen appliances are created — or maintained — equal, This Is Us creator Dan Fogelman would like to remind everyone in the wake of Tuesday’s devastating episode.

Taking a moment to remind everyone that it was a 20 year old fictional crockpot with an already funky switch? Let’s not just lump all those lovely hardworking crockpots together. #ThisIsUs

— Dan Fogelman (@Dan_Fogelman) January 24, 2018

He’s referring to the episode’s big revelation: The fire that destroyed the Pearson family home (and likely killed Jack) was started by a faulty slow cooker secondhand-gifted to Jack and Rebecca by a neighbor years before. And because the downstairs smoke detector battery hadn’t been replaced, the family didn’t become aware of the blaze until flames had already spread through much of the home. (We’ll find out precisely what happened to the Pearson patriarch in the post-Super Bowl episode slated for Sunday, Feb. 4.)

The company cheekily addressed the episode on Facebook — even though the kitchen gadget portrayed in the hour is technically labeled “Slow Cooker” and not actually the brand name “Crock-Pot” — Wednesday afternoon. In a few posts, the brand sympathized with “heartbroken” Jack afficionados and pointed to the idea that the cookers are safe, in part because they have been “generationally tested by your family and friends”

UPDATE: Late Wednesday, a Crock-Pot spokesperson got back to TVLine with the following statement:

Crock-Pot understands the concerns brought up by last night’s episode of This Is Us, and we too are heartbroken by the latest development in Jack’s storyline. However, it is important that our consumers understand and have confidence that all Crock-Pot slow cookers exceed all internal testing protocols and all applicable industry safety standards and regulations as verified by independent third-party testing labs. For nearly 50 years, with over 100 million Crock-Pots sold, we have never received any consumer complaints similar to the fictional events portrayed in last night’s episode. In fact, the safety and design of our product renders this type of event nearly impossible.

In addition, and most relevant to the concerns consumers are having after watching the recent This Is Us episode, our Crock-Pot slow cookers are low current, low wattage (typically no more than 200 or 300 watts) appliances with self-regulating, heating elements. The product is designed to cook foods over a longer period of time at low temperatures and the switches connect to only 1 side of the power line voltage, so there is never a high voltage applied directly across our switches. The switches within our slow cookers are subjected to additional internal testing, which includes a Rotary Knob Endurance test, Rotary Knob Force Test and Flame Burning Test and constructed of self-extinguishing, flame resistant material.

Our hope is that the team at NBC’s This Is Us will help us spread factual information regarding our product’s safety. While we know their primary mission is to entertain – something they have continued to excel in – we also feel they have a responsibility to inform. Just like many fans, we will be watching next week’s episode to see how Jack’s story progresses and, regardless of the outcome, we want consumers first and foremost to know they are safe when using their Crock-Pot.

Anyway, thanks for nothin’, George.

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‘This Is Us’ Reveals How Jack Died in ‘Super Bowl Sunday’ (SPOILERS)

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched “Super Bowl Sunday,” the special post-Super Bowl episode of “This Is Us” that aired Feb. 4.

Breathe, just breathe.

The final scene of “That’ll Be The Day,” the 13th episode of the second season of “” revealed that Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) died because he left a decades old, slightly defective slow cooker plugged in overnight. It sparked, catching the dish towel on the counter on fire — a fire which then spread to the curtains, family photos, walls and eventually the whole house. Series creator Dan Fogelman said what would come next would be “inarguably saddest episode” — and that’s exactly what “Super Bowl Sunday” delivered.

The episode picked up in the moments after the previous one left off — with the Pearson house on fire. Jack awoke in the middle of the night, saw the smoke, and knew what to do. He rushed to get teenage Randall (Niles Fitch) out of his room, but also told Rebecca (Mandy Moore) to wet all of the towels and kept teenage Kate (Hannah Zeile) from opening her door to avoid a backdraft situation. He then led his family to safety, first shielding Kate’s body from the flames with his own, and then lowering them down to the ground from the second story using sheets — before going back in for Kate’s dog.

Saving the dog wasn’t enough, though. Jack also came back out with “the important stuff,” including a family photo album and the tape of Kate singing.

Yes, he survived the blaze. But the show wasn’t quite ready to answer how he died: So with a cough from the smoke inhalation and second degree burns on his hands that required a trip to the hospital, “This Is Us” then popped over to present day.

With her new dog, Kate (Chrissy Metz) was watching the tape of her singing her original song, which was part of her adult pre-Super Bowl game ritual. Unfortunately, aher VCR was as ancient as Jack and Rebecca’s slow cooker and just as defective — it ate her tape.

Toby (Chris Sullivan) came to the rescue, bringing Kate and the VCR to a repair place where he tried to make her feel better by saying they could put the song in the cloud or make a new tape. But that’s not what Kate wanted. “He died because of me,” Kate said of her father. “In the scariest moments of our lives he couldn’t bear to disappoint me, so if once a year I want to beat myself up for it, please just let me. Just let me sit in that.” Miraculously, though, the tape was ultimately saved.

Over at Rebecca’s, Kevin (Justin Hartley) shared that his usual pre-game ritual would be to get blackout drunk, but instead today he was just going to try to be the “only family member who didn’t get intensely sad today.” (For what it’s worth, what he actually spent the day doing — looking through old family mementos, including his father’s AA chip, and attempting to meditate — still seemed pretty sad.) Rebecca, meanwhile, teased that Jack always sends her signs — laughs — on days like this. And of course that meant so was the audience. It’s like Chekhov’s gun: You don’t say something like that unless you’re going to pay it off. Get those tissues ready.

Randall (Sterling K. Brown) wasn’t sad, though: His recent goofy upswing continued because he wanted his daughters to enjoy the game as much as he does. “Kate wallows, Kevin avoids, but I celebrate,” he said.

But his family wasn’t nearly as excited for the game as he was — his daughters were more excited for their new lizard and the halftime game — which caused him to offhandedly mention they need more boys in the house. Again, Chekhov’s gun: Cut to the little boy in foster care the show teased in an earlier episode. Turns out his name is Jordan and he finds the other kids too loud. His social worker tells him they think they found a family for him. But since this is “This Is Us,” those answers don’t come right away.

Tess (Eris Baker) confessed to taking the landline (more outdated technology for this family!) off the hook so that they would miss the social worker’s call. She saw her father’s actions of meeting his new dad and getting a new job and trying for new kids as a way of getting a whole new life — that might not include her. Of course Randall — in true Randall fashion — reassured her that she was his No.1 and that she would live with him until she was 25 and still have to have dinner with him once a week.

That lizard, by the way, was the first official casualty of the episode. Beth (Susan Kelechi Watson) stepped on it after Annie (Faithe Herman) let it out of its cage. Randall stopped his Super Bowl party to hold a memorial for the lizard — and as he spoke, he had flashes of watching his father get in the car to go to the hospital after the fire. He recounted a story about tooth pain that acted as a metaphor. “It’s like a lightning bolt you can’t even see reaching inside you and tearing out your guts,” he said.

Back in the past, Jack gets checked out in the hospital, refusing drugs for the pain and apologizing to Rebecca for not getting batteries for the smoke detector (she pointed out she could have gotten them herself). But as Rebecca stood at a payphone in the lobby making calls to book hotel rooms and check on the kids, doctors and nurses ran around behind her — Jack was dying off-screen.

“One of the complications of smoke inhalation is that it puts terrible stress on the lungs and the heart. Your husband went into cardiac arrest,” the doctor told Rebecca. “I’m afraid we lost him.”

The episode sat with Rebecca as the news sunk in — with the stages of grief coming hard and fast, starting with the denial that “we were only here for burns” and taking a bite of the candy bar she’d just bought from the vending machine.

As she passed the terrible news to Miguel (Jon Huertas), he started to fall apart — but she told him they weren’t going to do that. “I have to go in, and I have to talk to my kids, and I have to ruin the rest of their lives. So I’m going to be strong for them,” she said. “And if you can’t be strong for them, you have to take a walk around the block until you can.” It was only in a montage that we saw her deliver the news to the kids, and then later, finally break down herself in the car.

Back in present day, Kevin headed to his father’s tree, acknowledging that he doesn’t come to see his father nearly often enough. But mostly, he was there to pay his final amends — to cross the last name off his list. “I’m sorry I wasn’t there that night, and I’m sorry the last thing I ever said to you was awful,” he said. “I’m going through some stuff that you went through, and I’m not doing it nearly as well as you.”

Kevin also called his mother and told her that he saw how strong she was when Jack died. She said she tried to do what she could to protect them, and she tried. “Your dad never had to try,” she said. She then confided in Kevin about that candy bar. “It’s the first thing I think of when I think of that night,” she said. And then she got her laugh: when Kevin admitted he wasn’t sure he was at the right tree.

As for that little boy, Jordan? He wasn’t Randall and Beth’s next foster kid — he was a foster kid a grown-up Tess was helping to place. The social worker at the start of the episode was Randall’s eldest, now an adult. And the voice at the other end of the home phone was Deja, who it looks like will be returning to the Pearsons.

“This Is Us” airs on Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on NBC.