Sunday roast dinner recipe

Classic Sunday Pot Roast is an easy to make comfort food that is hearty, filling, and can easily feed the whole family. This recipe will work for a classic oven braise as well as in a slow cooker or Instant Pot.

When it comes to a Sunday dinner in America, there’s nothing quite as classic as pot roast. Of course, the day of the week doesn’t really matter, pot roast is a delicious dinner for any day of the week. A good pot roast can be made with any cut of beef roast. Popular choices include chuck roast, round roast, and briskets. The beef is seasoned and seared. The pan then needs to be deglazed with a braising liquid—commonly beef broth and red wine. We like to add in garlic and Worcestershire sauce for a more complex flavor. It really kicks things up a notch.

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POT ROAST VEGETABLES: The classic mix of vegetables to add on top of your pot roast include potatoes, onions, and carrots. We recommend using a white or sweet onion, but yellow onions often fair well during the slow braising process as well. Carrots can either be cut into chunks, or you can use baby carrots for easy preparation. We don’t recommend slicing your carrots into thin discs because they tend to turn to mush. We recommend using either red potatoes or Yukon gold. If you choose to use russet potatoes, be sure to peel them first.

Best Roasts for Making Pot Roast

  • Chuck Roast – tender, falls apart when finished and easily shredded
  • Round Roast (bottom round, top round) – lean and easy to slice
  • Beef Brisket – fattier option that gets super tender, but can still be sliced for serving

How do I make pot roast in a slow cooker?

Season the roast with salt and pepper as directed in step 2 of the recipe. Searing in oil in a skillet is an optional step. Searing your beef roast helps the fat render and seal in the moisture so it’s worth the extra time and dishes. But we also recognize that one of the benefits of using a slow cooker is a short prep time so that you can throw everything in. Place the seared or un-seared meat directly into a slow cooker. Add in all remaining ingredients and cook on low 8 hours.

PRO TIP: It’s better to cook pot roast on the low setting rather than the high setting when it comes to pot roast. Your meat will be tender and delicious every time.

How do I make pot roast in an Instant Pot electric pressure cooker?

Follow this recipe as directed, but instead of searing and baking the roast in a large pot, you’ll do all of this in your pressure cooker. Sear the roast as directed in step 2 using the sear setting on your electric pressure cooker. Cook the garlic, and deglaze the pan with liquids, and add in vegetables. Cook on high pressure for 60 minutes, followed by a 15 minute natural release. Then, switch the release valve to the venting position. Remove lid once steam has stopped coming out.

PRO TIP: the natural release portion of electric pressure cooking is an important step. We have found that if you release the pressure immediately after cooking, your beef may toughen up. Letting the pressure cooker sit for 15 minutes during the natural release stage produces a more tender result.

MORE GREAT RECIPES: If you liked this recipe, you may also enjoy some of our other classic Sunday dinners like Braised Beef Short Ribs, Roast Chicken, and Easy Baked Pork Chops.

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

Classic Sunday Pot Roast

Classic Sunday Pot Roast is an easy to make comfort food that is hearty, filling, and can easily feed the whole family. This recipe will work for a classic oven braise as well as in a slow cooker or Instant Pot.

Prep Time15 mins Cook Time3 hrs Total Time3 hrs 15 mins Pin Servings: 8 Servimngs

Ingredients

  • 1 3 to 5 pound beef roast chuck, round, or brisket
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 6 cloves minced garlic
  • 1 to 2 cups red wine*
  • 2 cups low sodium beef broth
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 large white onions cut into 2 inch chunks
  • 1 pound baby carrots
  • 1 pound red potatoes cut into bite-sized chunks
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Get a large oven safe dutch oven pot heating over high heat.
  • Season both sides of chuck roast with salt and pepper. Add vegetable oil to pot and sear roast until browned, about 3 to 4 minutes each side.
  • Remove roast from pan and set aside briefly on a plate or cutting board. Add garlic to pot and saute 60 seconds. Deglaze pan with red wine and beef broth. Add roast back to the pot.
  • Pour Worcetershire sauce over roast and place the onion chunks, carrots, and potatoes on top of and around the meat. Place rosemary sprig on top.
  • Place a lid on the pan and transfer it to the preheated 350 degree oven. Cook 3 hours, or until meat reaches an internal temperature of 202 degrees F and shreds easily with a fork. Season vegetables with additional salt and pepper to taste and serve hot.

Notes

*You can replace the wine with either more beef broth OR grape juice. Use up to 2 cups for a larger roast. SLOW COOKER INSTRUCTIONS: Season the roast with salt and pepper as directed in step 2 of the recipe. Searing in oil in a skillet is an optional step. Place the seared or un-seared meat directly into a slow cooker. Add in all remaining ingredients and cook on low 8 hours. INSTANT POT ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKER INSTRUCTIONS: Follow this recipe as directed, but instead of searing and baking the roast in a large pot, you’ll do all of this in your pressure cooker. Sear the roast as directed in step 2 using the sear setting on your electric pressure cooker. Cook the garlic, and deglaze the pan with liquids, and add in vegetables. Cook on high pressure for 60 minutes, followed by a 15 minute natural release. Then, switch the release valve to the venting position. Remove lid once steam has stopped coming out.

Nutrition

Calories: 680kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Protein: 57g | Fat: 36g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Cholesterol: 195mg | Sodium: 1063mg | Potassium: 1662mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 7865IU | Vitamin C: 11mg | Calcium: 99mg | Iron: 7.7mg Course: Dinner, Main Course Cuisine: American Keyword: Pot Roast

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Claire Robinson

Sunday Roast Beef and Gravy

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Using a heavy hand, season rib-eye roast with salt and pepper on all sides. Heat olive oil in a large Dutch oven or a roasting pan. Place beef in hot pan and sear until deep golden brown on all sides. Transfer the pan to the oven and roast for about 15 minutes per pound for medium-rare, making an approximate hour of cooking time. Remove the pan from oven and transfer the beef to a cutting board. Allow meat to rest for at least 15 minutes, tented with foil, before carving.
  3. Gravy:
  4. Pour off excess fat from the Dutch oven (reserve for Thyme for Yorkshire Pudding, if desired) and place on the stovetop over medium heat. Add shallots and cook until soft and brown, about 4 to 6 minutes. Deglaze the pot with 1/2 cup of the wine, scraping up browned bits from the bottom. Add remaining wine, bring to a boil and reduce by half. Add stock and simmer until reduced again by about half. Pass the gravy through a fine mesh sieve and return to the pan. Bring back to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer until desired gravy consistency is reached. Taste for seasoning and adjust, if necessary. Carve beef against the grain, into thin slices, and serve with gravy.

It’s no surprise that the Sunday roast is close to our hearts – it represents family and friends like no other meal. In fact, the Sunday roast is beaten only by fish and chips (eaten by the seaside) as the nation’s overall most-loved food,according to a poll earlier this year by Visit Cornwalll.

But for the cook, a good Sunday roast can be one of the hardest challenges. Unlike fancy restaurant-style dishes, there’s nowhere to hide, no slick techniques or sauces to cover up slip ups. But never fear – here’s a round up of how to pull it off to perfection, every week.

The perfect roast chicken

We food writers are always banging on about it, so you know the rule by now: get the best chicken you can afford. Marks & Spencer do some great Pembrokeshire chickens which are raised for 90 days – more than twice the industry standard, which makes for a much more intense flavour. That said, if you can’t run to anything that exalted, then you’ll still get a fine Sunday lunch using a cheaper bird if you roast it this way.

The ultimate roast chicken recipe

Start preparing the chicken the day before Credit: Bon Appetit / Alamy

The perfect roast beef

A rib or beef or a fillet are the Rolls Royce choice, but out of the question for most of us on a regular Sunday. Topside looks the part and has a good flavour, though it is best roasted at most to medium. Ask the butcher to roll it with a layer of fat on the outside to help baste it, and once cooked, carve it in thin slices.

The ultimate roast beef recipe

Roast rib eye of beef with all the trimmings Credit: MBI / Alamy

The perfect roast lamb

Lots of recipes call for spiking lamb with slivers of garlic. I prefer to crush mine with black pepper and squish the puree into slits in the meat – messier, but makes for more garlic flavour.

The ultimate roast lamb recipe

Try lamb with a fresh yoghurt sauce Credit: Tim Hill / Alamy Stock Photo

The perfect roast pork

It’s hard to go wrong with pork with rosemary. Pork leg tends to be dry, so the moister shoulder is a better bet. Roast it slow and low.

The ultimate roast pork recipe

Credit: MARTIN POPE

The perfect gravy

The gravy rules are more or less the same whatever the meat, and the most important point is to get rid of the fat – especially lamb fat, which can leave a greasy feeling in the mouth. A gravy separator is an indispensible bit of kit here.

To make the gravy, once the meat is cooked remove it from the roasting tin and put it in a warm place to rest – essential for tender juicy meat. Pour any liquid from the tin into a gravy separator or jug. (You can throw away the vegetables carrots and onion – or puree them in a food processor to add to the gravy later if you like.)

Put the roasting tin on the hob and pour in 300ml water or stock, plus a splash of wine or madeira if you fancy it. Bring to the boil, stirring and scraping, to loosen and dissolve any residue in the tin.

Pour this into the separator/jug as well. Now you’ve captured all the flavour, you can continue to use the roasting tin (saving on washing up) or transfer to a pan to make the gravy. It’s up to you.

Spoon 2 tbsp fat from the top of the jug/separator into the roasting tin or pan, and put it on the hob. Stir in 2 tbsp flour, and cook until the flour begins to brown. Little by little, add the juices from the separator or jug (if you are using a jug you will need to spoon off the fat first), whisking as you go to make a smooth gravy. If necessary add more stock or water to get the right consistency.

If you want a sweeter gravy, add some of the pureed carrot and onion, spoonful by spoonful, tasting as you go – take care, as too much can give it a carrot-soup flavour. Season with salt and (if it really seems a bit dull) a dab of Bovril (for beef) or Marmite – or best of all Fortnum and Mason’s beef stock in a jar, which is my secret gravy fix (£12.95 for 198g.) Strain into a warmed gravy jug.

The perfect Yorkshires

There was a bit of a ding dong recently as to whether it was “correct” to eat Yorkshire pudding with anything other than beef. The answer is, of course it’s not, strictly, and if you are the sort of person who thinks it is sacrilege to drink red wine with fish or have cheese before dessert then you should definitely abstain. The rest of us should go right ahead, safe in the knowledge that a) a Yorkshire with gravy helps the meat go further (a good thing) and b) Yorkshires are delicious.

Yorkshire rules are:

  1. If you can make the batter ahead of time (the day before is fine) then it will be lighter. But if you don’t, it’s unlikely anyone will notice.
  2. The fat needs to be shimmeringly hot before you pour the batter in. Put it on the hob to get it on the verge of smoking if you are in any doubt.
  3. Individual Yorkshires are crisp and airy, plus they look neat, but baking the batter in a big tin gives a lovely ratio of crunch-to-squidge.

The ultimate Yorkshire puddings recipe

Embrace the ultimate comfort meal and go the whole hog with your Sunday roast. Choose the very best mains, sides and sweets to create the most hearty meal your family’s ever seen.

Your main meat


Traditionally, the Sunday roast comprises beef, veggies and Yorkshire puds. So if you’re a bastion of proper roast rules, it’s worth trying our magnificent silverside of beef with French onion gravy. This five-star roast recipe is slow cooked to perfection and uses the stock to make a rich gravy that’ll go down in family history.

Our favourite beef roasts…

Roast sirloin of beef
One-pot beef brisket & braised celery

If you’re prepared to stray from tradition, we have a treat for you. Maybe a roast lamb, studded with rosemary and garlic is more your taste? Stud the meat in advance so the flavours permeate and have time to intensify. If you’re prepared to really branch out, no one can resist this top-rated maple-mustard pulled pork.

Perfect potatoes


Potatoes maketh the meal. Your choices are numerous: roasties, mash, gratin, Dauphinoise… so we’ve given you the best of the best. You can also read up on the best fat for cooking your roasties in our handy guide, to make sure you get the crispiest skin possible.

When it comes to roasties, we want them golden and crispy, with fluffy insides and plenty of seasoning. Our Parmesan-roasted potatoes are the ultimate flavourful cheesy roasties. They’re best enjoyed hot from the oven and won’t stick around long enough for leftovers.


Move over roasties – if you’re craving something creamy, cheesy and crisp, we’ve got the ultimate mash-up of Dauphinoise and domino potatoes and this domino Dauphinoise is a true Sunday dinner showstopper.

Never let it be said that we would limit ourselves to just one kind of potato. If you couldn’t live without a dollop of comforting mash on your Sunday dinner plate, we highly recommend our garlic mash potato bake, that goes well beyond the standard stodge.

Our favourite mash recipes…

Horseradish mash
Creamy mash

Make the most of versatile veg


Choose only the finest of sides to accompany your roast. Depending on what’s in season, you’ve got the veg patch at your feet in terms of options. We’ve picked the essentials for a proper plate of first-class veg.
A honey glaze can transform your carrots and intensify their flavour. Get a fantastic sour-sweet dimension with our honey-glazed roast carrots, or try a dollop of something different with our harissa & marmalade carrots.

We’d also never be without some greenery. Feel free to add all the roots you like to your roast. These sticky salted-maple roasted parsnips are also a must. If you need a little colour on your plate, this braised red cabbage has spice and bite.

Yorkshire pudding perfection


No roast would be complete without a gloriously puffed-up pudding. Try our ultimate Yorkshire pudding recipe for piping hot, fat and crisp, fluffy Yorkies. If you’re ready to branch out, our guide to flavouring your Yorkshire pud batter could be your ideal next step. Ever thought of mustard and herb Yorkshires? Or a bacon-filled batter?

Read up on 8 ways to flavour Yorkshire pudding batter in our guide.

Good gravy


A decent gravy can make or break a roast, and a bit of booze can often bring out depth of flavour in a gravy. So why not try our make-ahead Prosecco & wild mushroom gravy, or a sticky port gravy for extra oomph?

A creamy bread sauce also goes well with a succulent roast, and our delectable bread & onion sauce is the cream of the crop.

Something sweet


Once the plates are cleared and everyone’s had their fill, everyone loves a little something sweet to finish off the roast. Our traditional trifle colleciton has something for everyone, or, if you’re craving cocoa our chocolate desserts are hard to resist.

Our favourite individual pudding pots…

White chocolate mousse with poached rhubarb
Apple crumble sundae
Chocolate & pistachio mousses

What’s your ultimate roast combination? Let us know in the comments below…

Sunday Roasted Whole Chicken Dinner, a very easy to follow recipe with cook times and instructions for the chicken, gravy, roast potatoes and vegetable side dishes

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Sunday Roasted Whole Chicken Dinner! This is a lovely recipe which will give you rotisserie style chicken, with juicy meat and a crispy skin. Full of flavor and easy recipe. People often ask what goes well with Roast chicken, so I’ve also included cooking times and an order of instructions if you wanted to make the roast potatoes, vegetables and gravy to make this a complete Roast chicken dinner.

Often people can feel a little intimidated at the thought of cooking a Sunday Roast Dinner.

It can turn into a nightmare if you don’t organise yourself and get your timings right so that everything is ready at the right time. A traditional Sunday Roast dinner would usually be made up of a joint of meat, whether it be a whole chicken, leg of lamb, joint of beef or pork, along with roast potatoes, Yorkshire Puddings, a selection of vegetables, and gravy.

The beauty of having a roast dinner is that any leftovers can be used the following day, such as roast chicken sandwiches, or chopping the cold meat into cubes and adding to a fried rice for your Monday dinner! So here we have our lovely Roast Chicken Dinner recipe.

There’s also ‘Bubble and Squeak’ which is a mixture of all the left over vegetables and potatoes, fried up and eaten with gravy the following day. So you may think you would never get through a joint of meat or a whole chicken, but it really can save you money as larger cuts of meat are often cheaper, and much tastier when cooked whole.

Here you will be shown how to roast a whole chicken and keep it moist, and also get a nice crispy skin. We will keep it healthy, using very little oil, and no butter. There’s also a link to how to make crispy crunchy roast potatoes (on my blog), so trust me, this recipe doesn’t require any skill, apart from thinking about your timings, but you do that every day when you have to get up for work, or catch a bus right?

At the end of our Roast Chicken dinner recipe, I’ve added a few other side dishes if you’d like to make those instead of the side dishes in this recipe. They’re all very popular recipe and are suitable for any time of year as the ingredients are always available in the supermarkets. Please enjoy!

Ingredients:

The chicken
1 Whole chicken. Allow a 4lb bird for 4 persons
1 onion Sliced
2 Cloves Garlic
2 Tablespoons Tarragon or mixed herbs of your choice
Juice of 1 lemon plus remainder of lemon cut into pieces
salt and pepper
1 Tablespoon olive oil

The Gravy
2 Tablespoon cornflour or gravy thickener (follow thickener guide for quantity)
500 ml or 1/2 quart of boiling water or better, use the water from the vegetables you have cooked.
1 chicken stock cube.
salt & pepper if needed.
Juices from the roasted chicken

The potatoes
Calculate roughly 2 medium sized potatoes per person.
See here for cooking instructions for roasting potatoes

The vegetables
Choose vegetables that you like and are in season. for example, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, carrots, cabbage etc. Whatever takes your fancy!

Instructions:

1. Turn oven on to 220C, 425F, Gas 7

2. Prepare the chicken. Give it a wash and remove any innards if necessary.
Tidy the bird up. first, tuck the wings underneath so they’re not exposed and get burnt. See photos .

3. We will be cooking the chicken on a very high heat to keep it moist and succulent. We have to make sure it cooks evenly, so now we need to make a slit in between the leg and the main body of the chicken on both sides. This area is generally the thickest part and takes longer to cook, so by doing this we will make sure the legs will cook at the same speed at the white meat.

Fold each wing under the chicken

Slash through where the skin is holding the leg to the main body

Top Tippie: If you are going to boil your vegetables, keep the used water to add to your gravy. It’s full of vitamins and will add flavor to your gravy!

4. Line a roasting tin with foil (easier to wash up after!).

5. Peel and slice the onion into circles and place on the bottom of the tray. The chicken will sit on top of the onions.
Adding onions will flavor the juices in the tray which will be added to the gravy and also the steam from the onions cooking will keep the chicken moist as well as add flavor.

6. Make up a quick wet marinade. Add the garlic, lemon juice, tarragon, olive oil & salt and pepper into a mortar and pestle and beat until mashed together. If you don’t have a mortar and pestle, mix together in a bowl, you will need to pass the garlic through a garlic press first.

7. Rub the marinade all over the chicken and place the chicken on the onions, in your roasting tray. Add the bits of lemon left over from the juice in the cavity of the chicken.

8. Place a sheet of foil over the chicken, lifting in the center (pinch it and pull slightly) so the foil is not touching the top of the chicken. This will allow for heat and steam to circulate better and the skin won’t stick to the foil.

The photo below shows a variation marinade I often use. I have flat leaf parsley, garlic, red currant jelly and olive oil, together with some sliced onions on the top, as well as underneath the chicken. So delicious! Feel free to make up some other herb variations of your choice too.

9. Place the chicken in the oven and allow 15 minutes per pound. So a 4lb chicken would take 1 hour total cooking time at the temperature listed above.

10. At this point, prepare the roast potatoes and place in the oven after the chicken has been cooking for 30 minutes. See here for our Roast Potatoes recipe

11. Prepare your chosen vegetables. Start cooking your vegetables when you have taken your chicken out of the oven. If you want to cook them now, you will need to keep them warm somewhere or reheat.

12. Take the chicken out of the oven after 45 minutes, and remove the foil from the top. Spoon any juices into a gravy saucepan and return the chicken to the oven for the last 15 minutes to brown up.

Ready for browning

At this point, start cooking your vegetables.
Make up the gravy. If you are boiling the vegetables, use the cooked vegetable water and add to a saucepan, together with the other gravy ingredients and heat up, stir to make sure there are no lumps.

If you are using a different size chicken, take the foil off 15 minutes before the end cooking time for the chicken to brown.
13. When the cooking time is up for the chicken, take it out of the oven and cover with the foil you removed from step 12. Let it rest until your potatoes are ready or for about 15 minutes.

If you try and carve the white meat when it is too hot and not rested it will all fall apart and make a mess! So be patient and let the meat rest!

14. Carve the chicken. I usually start by removing the leg & wing from one side and then carve the breast on that same side. Then repeat the other side. Serve at the table with vegetables, potatoes & your delicious gravy!
Take a look at the photos below and see how moist the white meat is.

Remember, we haven’t used any butter, and just 1 Tablespoon of olive oil for the wet rub. You can make this meal for sure! Just follow the instructions and you will be fine.

We’d love to hear from you and what you thought of our post. Did you make any changes or add some other goodies? Let us know in the comments below. Thanks for reading and happy cooking!

See how juicy!

Here are a few dishes for you to enjoy!

Roast Chicken Pie, this uses up all the left overs from your roast chicken dinner, including any roast potatoes, vegetables and gravy! It’s delicious and really easy to prepare.

Creamy Cheesy Mashed Potatoes

Yorkshire Puddings

Quick and Easy Garlic Cabbage and Carrots

Roast Pork and Crackling

Prime Rib Roast

Honey Glazed Ham

Roast Beef Dinner

and something for dessert which is nice and easy and you can make ahead too! Easy Mandarin Dessert

5 from 1 vote Sunday Roast Chicken Dinner Prep Time 15 mins Cook Time 1 hr Total Time 1 hr 15 mins Servings: 4 Ingredients The chicken

  • 1 Whole chicken. Allow a 4lb bird for 4 persons
  • 1 onion Sliced see step 5 photo below
  • 2 Cloves Garlic
  • 2 Tablespoons Tarragon or mixed herbs of your choice
  • pieces Juice of 1 lemon plus remainder of lemon cut into
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil

The Gravy

  • 2 Tablespoon cornflour or gravy thickener follow thickener guide for quantity
  • 500 ml or 1/2 quart of boiling water or better use the water from the vegetables you have cooked.
  • 1 chicken stock cube.
  • salt & pepper if needed.
  • Juices from the roasted chicken

The potatoes

  • Calculate roughly 2 medium sized potatoes per person.

The vegetables

  • in Choose vegetables that you like and are season. for example broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, carrots,cabbage etc. Whatever takes your fancy!

Instructions

  1. Turn oven on to 220C, 425F, Gas 7
  2. Prepare the chicken. Give it a wash and remove any innards if necessary.
  3. Tidy the bird up. first, tuck the wings underneath so they’re not exposed and get burnt.
  4. We will be cooking the chicken on a very high heat to keep it moist and succulent. We have to make sure it cooks evenly, so now we need to make a slit in between the leg and the main body of the chicken on both sides. This area is generally the thickest part and takes longer to cook, so by doing this we will make sure the legs will cook at the same speed at the white meat.
  5. Line a roasting tin with foil (easier to wash up after!).
  6. Peel and slice onion into circles and place on the bottom of the tray. The chicken will sit on top of the onions.
  7. Adding onions will flavour the juices in the tray which will be added to the gravy and also the steam from the onions cooking will keep the chicken moist as well as add flavour.
  8. Make up a quick wet marinade. Add the garlic, lemon juice, tarragon, olive oil & salt and pepper into a mortar and pestle and beat until mashed together. If you don’t have a mortar and pestle, mix together in a bowl, you will need to pass the garlic through a garlic press first.
  9. Rub the marinade all over the chicken and place the chicken on the onions, in your roasting tray. Add the bits of lemon left over from the juice in the cavity of the chicken.
  10. Place a sheet of foil over the chicken , lifting in the center (pinch it and pull slightly) so the foil is not touching the top of the chicken. This will allow for heat and steam to circulate better and the skin won’t stick to the foil.
  11. Place the chicken in the oven and allow 15 minutes per pound. So a 4lb chicken would take 1 hour total cooking time at the temperature listed above.
  12. At this point, prepare the roast potatoes and place in the oven after the chicken has been cooking for 30 minutes.
  13. Prepare your chosen vegetables. Start cooking your vegetables when you have taken your chicken out of the oven. If you want to cook them now, you will need to keep them warm somewhere or reheat.
  14. Take the chicken out of the oven after 45 minutes, and remove the foil from the top. Spoon any juices into a gravy saucepan and return the chicken to the oven for the last 15 minutes to brown up.
  15. At this point, start cooking your vegetables.
  16. Make up the gravy. If you are boiling the vegetables, use the cooked vegetable water and add to a saucepan, together with the other gravy ingredients and heat up, stir to make sure there are no lumps.
  17. If you are using a different size chicken, take the foil off 15 minutes before the end cooking time for the chicken to brown.
  18. When the cooking time is up for the chicken, take it out of the oven and cover with the foil you removed from step 12. Let it rest until your potatoes are ready or for about 15 minutes.
  19. If you try and carve the white meat when it is too hot and not rested it will all fall apart and make a mess! So be patient and let the meat rest!
  20. Carve the chicken. I usually start by removing the leg & wing from one side and then carve the breast on that same side. Then repeat the other side. Serve at the table with vegetables, potatoes & your delicious gravy!
  21. Remember, we haven’t used any butter, and just 1 Tablespoon of olive oil for the wet rub. You can make this meal for sure! Just follow the instructions and you will be fine.

How to make a Sunday Roast:

Going to a pub for a Sunday Roast is one of my favorite things to do in London. A Sunday Roast is a meal that is served on Sunday afternoons and it consists of a roasted meat with gravy, roasted potatoes, vegetables, and Yorkshire Pudding. It’s a big hearty meal and a very British alternative to a Sunday Brunch.

Since my husband, Charles, is British I thought that it would be fun to cook up at Sunday Roast! Sunday Roast can include any type of meat. Beef, chicken, and pork are all popular. I decided to make pork loin because, in my experience, it is hard to mess up a pork roast. Plus, pork is far less expensive than beef.

First I prepared the Yorkshire Pudding. This is the type of recipe that is very easy to prepare, but if you don’t give it your full attention, it could go wrong. I made the Yorkshire Pudding first, and then prepared the rest of the meal. You can get the Yorkshire Pudding Recipe here.

The roast pork loin takes about 90 minutes from start to finish, so I like to get that going. Plus, if the pork gets done ahead of everything else, you can let it simmer in the gravy. This will make it extra tender. You can get the pork loin recipe here.

Next, I put the potatoes in the oven to roast. I peeled the potatoes, chopped them into big pieces, rinsed them, and put them in a large bowl. I drizzled melted butter and olive oil over, and I like to add a couple tablespoons of flour and parmesan to give the potatoes a crispy cheesy crust. The potatoes need to roast at 350 degrees for about an hour. Until they are golden brown.

With the Yorkshire Pudding ready and the potatoes in the oven, I turned my attention to the vegetables. It is common to serve at least two vegetables with Sunday Roast. I prepared broccoli and roasted carrots.

When it comes time to serve a Sunday Roast, Charles insists that you need to pour gravy into the center of the Yorkshire Pudding. Gravy is a big part of a Sunday Roast, it tends to be generously ladled onto your plate so that the meat and vegetables are sitting in a pool of gravy.

Sunday Roast Menu:

Roasted Pork Loin
Roasted Potatoes
Yorkshire Pudding
Eton Mess
How to Make Gravy from Pan Drippings