Stilton cheese for sale

Stilton Cheese

Quick facts about Stilton Stilton is unique among blue cheeses as it has a very long, slow set.
It is pierced at four weeks before maturing for a further eight, in order to develop its blue and break down the curd.
Today, only five producers of Stilton remain. They are Cropwell Bishop, Colston Bassett, Long Clawson, Tuxford and Tebbutt, and Webster’s.
Only two of these producers continue to make the cheese to traditional recipes that specify ‘hand-ladling’ of the curds. The Fine Cheese Co. stocks both of these cheeses: Cropwell Bishop ‘Traditional’ (differs from their standard cheese) and Colston Bassett.
Stilton cheese should have a crinkled, light drab crust and an ivory paste, with even blue veining radiating from its centre. The texture should be creamy and smooth, the taste mellow but complex.
Stilton has its own trademark and protected status. Only cheeses that come from the Vale of Belvoir (an area covering Nottinghamshire/Leicestershire/ Derbyshire) and are made with pasteurised local milk to the Stilton specification can carry the name (hence why Stichelton, which is made with raw milk, is excluded).
Stilton cheese made with Spring and Summer milk produces the best cheeses, which traditionally is why Stilton is eaten around Christmas. The history of Stilton Daniel Defoe famously mentions Stilton in his travels in 1724 as a town “famous for cheese”. While it is contested as to whether it was ever made here, it was certainly made famous by The Bell Inn in Stilton which sold it to passers-by.
In 1910 the Stilton cheesemakers organised themselves together to define and improve production methods, and protect the origins of the cheese. They later founded ‘The Stilton Cheesemakers Association’, gaining a trademark and the PDO it holds today.
Although its name and locality are specified, quality does vary. The 1910 definitions aren’t specific enough to prevent production of some poor quality Stilton, which can be dry, acidic, overly spicy, bitter, or claggy.
Around the turn of the century, production started to move to village dairies, with the last farm stopping production in 1935.
After World War II, growing industrialisation meant a change to automated methods of production. As time passed, only Colston Bassett persevered with the traditional recipe and continued to hand-ladle the curds in order to produce a creamier and smoother texture and taste. Only in 2010, did Cropwell Bishop join them to make a traditional, artisan cheese to sell alongside their standard cheese. Wine and drinks pairing ideas Stilton looks for its opposite in wine: something that counterbalances its saline richness. Port, as a wine that is both sweet and with weight is an ideal partner for Stilton.
Noval 10 Year Old Port is particularly delicious, its elegance coupled with notes of dried fruits, nuts and spices adds a warmth to the cheese.
Or you can try Slow Motion Sloe Gin. Its hedgerow-picked sloes are steeped in gin and have a delicate sweetness.
For the beer lover, Bath Ales Dark Side is a superbly smooth stout. It has a roasted barley aroma, a deep, dark colour and is extraordinary with Stilton. Crackers to partner Stilton

Walnuts make a lovely match for Stilton, so Walnut, Honey and Extra Virgin Olive Oil Crackers from The Fine Cheese Co make a great partner. If you prefer your cracker to be neutral, we recommend a Fine English Oatcake to bring out the butteriness of the cheese. If you prefer a touch of sweetness, our Fine English Wheat Fingers are all-butter sweet digestives that are a delicious contrast with the saline richness of Stilton.

Stilton PDO

This marvelous blue cheese is the English contender for “King of Cheeses.”

Although it’s made in parts of Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, it received its name in the 18th century because it was first sold in the small village of Stilton in Huntingdonshire.

Stilton is made from whole cow’s milk and allowed to ripen for 4 to 6 months, during which time it is skewered numerous times to encourage the growth of Pencillium roqueforti mold (also present in ROQUEFORT CHEESE).

This process creates a pale yellow interior with blue-green veins.

The texture is rich and creamy (45 percent fat) but slightly crumbly.

The flavor has a mellow CHEDDAR like quality with the pungency of blue cheese.

Stilton is sold in tall cylinders with a crusty brownish rind. In addition to this better-known mature version, there is also a young white Stilton that is marketed before the colored veins develop.

It has a mild and slightly sour flavor. Stilton is at its best eaten by itself with a glass of Porto or a full-bodied dry red wine

Stilton

Such was the popularity of Stilton that others in the area started to produce cheeses similar in style and in 1910, the producers had the foresight to lay down methods known today as Protected Designation of Origin (PDO). Amongst other things, the PDO specifies that the cheese has to be made with pasteurised milk within the counties of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. Paxton & Whitfield Stilton is made by Cropwell Bishop in Nottinghamshire and comprises cheeses that have been graded and chosen to meet the flavour and texture profiles specified by us.

The milk used to make Stilton is a blend of morning and evening milk to which starter culture, rennet and blue mould culture is added. Once curds have formed, the whey is drained and the curds are hand ladled from the vat to the ‘table’ where they settle overnight. The following day, the curds are milled, salted and transferred by hand into cylindrical moulds. After a week when the cheeses have started to develop, they are taken out of the moulds and the rind is smoothed down. They remain in the ripening room for a further four weeks before they are pierced with stainless steel needles to encourage air to reach the interior of the cheese to spread the growth of the characteristic blue veining. Paxton & Whitfield cheese is then matured to approximately twelve weeks before arriving to our shops to be sold.

The texture is creamy and the flavour mellow, with a buttery richness that melts in the mouth. Stilton in prime condition has a grey, wrinkly crust and the inside should be creamy yellow with an even spread of blue-green veins. The strength of the flavour should not be overpowering, but have a pleasant, herby tang.

Our P&W Vintage Port is a perfect match for Stilton.

Super Gold Winner at the World Cheese Awards 2018.

Cropwell Bishop Stilton achieved super gold in the 2013 World Cheese Awards.

Stilton Jar 250g

Such was the popularity of Stilton that others in the area started to produce cheeses similar in style and in1910, the producers had the foresight to lay down methods of production to protect where the cheese could be made and its nature. The controls still exist today in the form of a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO). Amongst other things, this PDO specifies that the cheese has to be made with pasteurised milk within the counties of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. Paxton & Whitfield Stilton is made by Cropwell Bishop in Nottinghamshire and comprises cheeses that have been graded and chosen to meet the flavour and texture profiles that we have put in place.

The milk used to make Stilton is a blend of morning and evening milk to which starter culture, rennet and blue mould culture is added. Once curds have formed, the whey is drained and the curds are hand ladled from the vat to the ‘table’ where they settle over night. The following day, the curds are milled, salted and transferred by hand into cylindrical moulds. After a week when the cheeses have started to develop, they are taken out of the moulds and the rind is smoothed down. They remain in the ripening room for a further 4 weeks before they are pierced with stainless steel needles to encourage air to reach the interior of the cheese to spread the growth of the characteristic blue veining. Paxton & Whitfield cheese is then matured to approximately twelve weeks before it gets sold from the shops.

Some of this Stilton gets chosen to be crumbled into our collectable jars, and is then covered with a clarified butter seal to ensure the quality of the product.

Blue Stilton | Premium Quality | Entire cheese 8 kilo / 17.6 lbs

On purchase of an entire Blue Stilton Cheese, you will receive a 20% discount compared to the kilo price.

Blue Stilton cheese: the tasty cheese from England
There are many good things that come from England. There is some great literature, big pop stars, amazing movie actors, and… Delicious cheese! If you think England is not necessarily a country where great cheese is made, think again. England may not be known as a cheese country, but with names like Cheddar and Gloucester, it does have some tasty cheeses around. And definitely don’t forget about Blue Stilton! This white cheese with its blue veins is one of the most delicious cheeses coming from England. Blue Stilton cheese is made in England exclusively, to be precise in the counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire. Only cheese made in these counties can ever be considered proper Stilton. Apart from this, the cheese has to have a cylindrical shape, be ripened naturally, and have long veins of blue radiating through it.

Ingredients:
Fat 50+, unpasteurised cow’s milk, vegetarian rennet, fungal culture, salt, lactic acid, vitamins A, B and D
Quality:
Your cheese is freshly cut and vacuum-packaged!
The hard structure of Blue Stilton cheese makes it perfectly suitable for sending by post.

Original Blue Stilton Cheese from the United Kingdom

The history of the Blue Stilton
Blue Stilton cheese has a fairly long history, beginning right around the 18th century. The first Englishman ever to sell Stilton cheese was Cooper Thornhill, the owner of the Bell Inn at Stilton, Huntingdonshire. In 1730 Cooper was visiting a nearby farm when he discovered a certain blue cheese. Back then, all farms made their own cheeses and these were all very different in taste, smell and look. Cooper fell in love with this particular blue cheese and bought the rights to it, so that his inn could sell the cheese. His inn was a busy and popular establishment along one of the main trade routes, so his Stilton soon spread out around England and sales boomed. However, even before that, the town of Stilton was well-known for its cheese, even though back then it was called English Parmesan. English writer Daniel Defoe (the writer of Robinson Crusoe) wrote about the town of Stilton and the well-known cheese in 1724. In 1936 the cheese makers’ association regulated the Stilton cheese standards to protect the authentic cheese, and that is why the guidelines right now are so strict. The Stilton cheese is the only English cheese which is protected in this way, and with good reason! If you haven’t yet, make sure you taste this delicious English cheese, you’ll surely love it.

Colston Bassett Blue Stilton

You know how much my wife and I love cheese. Most Saturday mornings we head to the Farmers Market to buy some ingredients for the weekend and pick up a tasty cheese with a loaf of Italian bread for our morning breakfast. My new friend Bill, whom I affectionately call Bill the Stinky Cheese Guy, is my new cheese mentor who turns me on to new cheeses every week. This week I want to talk about Blue Stilton.

Blue Stilton, also called the King of English cheeses, is one of the most spectacular cheeses to come out of England and is the only English cheese that enjoys trademark protection. In fact, there are only five dairies located in three counties licensed to produce Blue Stilton. They include:

Colston Bassett Dairy

Cropwell Bishop

Long Clawson Dairy

Tuxford & Tebbutt Creamery

Websters

It is such a fantastic cheese that it even inspired a sonnet!

Sonnet to a Stilton Cheese

Stilton, thou shouldst be living at this hour
And so thou art. Nor losest grace thereby;
England has need of thee, and so have I –
She is a Fen. Far as the eye can scour,
League after grassy league from Lincoln tower
To Stilton in the fields, she is a Fen.
Yet this high cheese, by choice of fenland men,
Like a tall green volcano rose in power.
Plain living and long drinking are no more,
And pure religion reading “Household Words”,
And sturdy manhood sitting still all day
Shrink, like this cheese that crumbles to its core;
While my digestion, like the House of Lords,
The heaviest burdens on herself doth lay.

–G. K. Chesterton

Blue Stilton In Short

Type: cow’s milk

Origin: Nottinghamshire, England

Process: blue mold, Penicillium roqueforti, is introduced at the outset; new cheese is drained, salted, molded and drained some more. Pierced after four to six weeks of aging to allow the mold to grow. Cheese is mature and ready for sale approximately ten weeks after starting the process.

Texture: unpressed, semi-firm blue

Shape: cylindrical

Color: pale straw with delicate bluish-gray veining

Rind: rubbed, thin, mottled orange

Flavor: buttery, salty, rich and creamy, pungent and peppery veining

The Rest of the Story

You might ask yourself – I know I did

What’s the difference between Stilton cheese and blue cheese?

Blue cheeses are produced in many parts of the world using many different types of milk. For instance, Gorgonzola is a blue cheese made in Italy of sheeps’ milk. All blue cheeses rely on the mold Penicillium roqueforti for their characteristic bluish-gray veins and sharp flavor.

Much like Champagne is a sparkling wine made in the Champagne district of France, Stilton is a particular type of blue cheese only licensed to be made in three shires (counties) in England–Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire. Interestingly, Stilton is not licensed to be made in Stilton, the town for which it is named, because Stilton is not in one of those three shires.

The natural question, then, is why is it called Stilton? While the town of Stilton produced a type of cheese (possibly blue), in the mid-1700’s innkeeper Cooper Thornhill of The Bell Inn in Stilton began “importing” this cheese from the surrounding counties. Over time, Stilton production localized in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire, while Stilton was sold and exported primarily from the town of Stilton itself.

To read more about the history of Stilton, .

What Helps Make Stilton Stilton?

Of all of the most well-known varieties of blue cheese, Stilton has the lowest water content, the lowest salt content and the highest fat and protein content. This means that is the richest and creamiest of all the blue cheeses, which might be one of the reasons that I like it so much.

Making Stilton Cheese

To make Stilton, cows’ milk is first pasteurized and then cooled to 86°F (30°C). It takes 17 gallons of milk to make one 17 lb Stilton cheese. It is then mixed with rennet and the Penicillium roqueforti mold.

Once the curd forms, it is sliced both vertically and horizontally into long, thin pieces, kind of like julienne cuts. The curds are milled, drained and salted by hand. Once thoroughly mixed, the curds are placed in cheese molds, or hoops. The curds continue to drain and the hoops are turned once a day to ensure even draining of the whey.

After five days, the cheese makers remove the hoops and then smooth the outside of the cheese with regular kitchen knives. The smoothing step not only makes the outside of the cheese look more finished, it also seals it so no air can get inside the cheese. This is important because the cheese is then aged for four to six weeks before being pierced with long stainless steel needles.

Piercing introduces air to the interior of the cheese, allowing the mold to start growing. While some blue cheeses let the mold begin growing at the beginning of the cheese making process, the makers of Stilton want the cheese to mature for a certain amount of time before the mold begins to grow, hence the smoothing of the cheese.

The piercing step is repeated a week later, and then the cheese is allowed to ripen a further three weeks before being graded and passed for sale.

Characteristics

Colston Bassett Stilton has a brownish rind that can be dry and rough. The interior paste has an ivory color with it’s trademarked greenish-blue veins. It definitely has a strong smell, some may call it a stinky cheese, but I call that a compliment. It also has a strong taste that I love but the kids wouldn’t touch.

According to Steven Jenkins, one of the most knowledgeable cheesemongers in America who wrote Cheese Primer about Stilton, “The flavor of a great Stilton cheese is full, rich, and creamy, as complex as that of any other great blue. It reveals layers and folds of the flavors of honey, leather, tobacco, and molasses.”

Doesn’t that just make you want to go out and buy some and taste for yourself?

White Stilton

At the Colston Bassett Dairy, one of only five dairies licensed to produce Stilton cheese, they also make a white Stilton. This cheese is made exactly like blue Stilton, but it isn’t pierced so the mold doesn’t grow.

White Stilton is mild and creamy and is often mixed with fruits and honey to make seasonal dessert cheeses, usually around Christmastime. Like its more well-known sibling, white Stilton also has a Protected Designation of Origin and can only be produced in the same six dairies licensed to produce blue Stilton.

Serving Stilton

Like most really excellent cheeses, Stilton should not be used in cooking. It pairs very nicely with crisp apples, and it is often served with a luscious port or sherry. As I mentioned above, I like to serve this cheese on a fresh French or Italian baguette for breakfast.

The other day I was making cheese quesadillas for my girls using a generic American cheese but decided to make one for myself with a little Stilton Blue. It was fantastic and took quesadillas to a whole other level for me.

I could also see cutting a thin slice and topping a grilled steak with it or using it in one of my demi based brown sauces. I know I said it shouldn’t be used for cooking but if it’s sitting in the refrigerator, why not?

Buying Stilton

There are a lot of great blue cheeses on the market and I hope to talk about many of them, but if you can find a Colston Bassett Stilton or one of the other name protected dairies version, give it a try and let me know what you think of it. Saying that, Stilton is not cheap.

I think I paid around $28 per pound for it so I purchased about 1/3 of a pound but this is strong stuff so a little goes a long way.

And be sure to buy Stilton from reputable cheese shops that know how to handle cheese and sell a lot of it. You don’t want to spend that kind of money expecting an incredible cheese only to be disappointed because the cheese purveyor didn’t know what they were doing.

As I always suggest, ask for a taste. If you don’t get it, buy your cheese somewhere else.

Online Sources: Cheese

Convenience – Selections – Quality – Gift Giving – Corporate Events

I strongly urge you to find a good cheese shop near you so you can get to know your cheesemongers and they get to know you. However, if you don’t have a good local cheese shop or they don’t have some of the cheeses I recommend, here are some online sources for you. Be careful to buy the best product you can afford so you don’t end up with an inferior product. The links below are affiliate links.Di Bruno Brothers is close to home to me. They have been in Philadelphia since 1939 and prided themselves on bringing amazing food to the city of Philadelphia and drawing food lovers together in their ‘home.’ They also have a store just outside of Philly where I get most of my cheese and cured meats. If you can’t find a particular cheese in your market, most likely Di Bruno Bros. will.
In 2002, a group of classically trained and talented Chefs found themselves as Executive Chefs in kitchens across the country. While creating their menus and gourmet specials it became obvious that certain quality products they had found in specific regions of the country and around the world were not always available to them. They quickly began to realize the value of getting the best, freshest and origin specific gourmet products to their kitchens and more importantly, to their customers. That need and passion for the freshest and finest gourmet products evolved into For the Gourmet.