Static out of clothes

“take off with my clothes” or “take off my clothes”

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Why your child needs to learn how to get dressed

Learning to get dressed builds your child’s confidence and independence and gives your child a sense of achievement. And once your child can dress himself, helping him get dressed is one less thing for you to do.

Also, getting dressed helps your child develop many other skills, including:

  • fine motor skills as she learns to fasten buttons and zips
  • gross motor skills as she stands on one leg to pull on a pair of pants
  • cognitive skills as she remembers which bits of clothing go on first, and builds the patience and attention to finish the task
  • language as she names types of clothes, colours and sizes
  • awareness of time and space as she learns to dress for certain occasions and weather conditions.

Getting started with getting dressed

Often very young children start to be aware of clothing by pulling off easy-to-remove things like socks, shoes or hats. Sometimes they try to put them on again. You can build on this early awareness by naming the clothes your child has taken off and the body parts they go on.

You can start to include your older baby or toddler in getting dressed by giving him a limited choice of clothes, and naming them as you put them on him.

When you decide it’s time for your child to really start learning this skill, it can help to have some easy clothes on hand. These might include:

  • loose, elastic-waisted pants
  • clothes with velcro or large buttons and button holes
  • jumpers, t-shirts and underwear with pictures on the front to help your child work out front from back
  • clothes that are easy and comfortable for your child to move in.

Getting dressed: breaking down the steps

Getting dressed can have a lot of steps. It helps to break it down into smaller steps – for example, putting on underwear, then t-shirt, shorts, socks and shoes.

You can also break down each of the steps in getting dressed, depending on your child’s skill and age. For example, you could break down the steps for putting on shorts like this:

  • Face shorts the right way.
  • Hold onto the front of the waistband.
  • Push one leg at a time through the leg holes while also holding pants.
  • Pull the shorts up.

Talking your child through each step helps her know what to do. In the early stages, simple words or phrases are OK – for example, ‘Shirt on’. You can say more as your child’s language develops – for example, ‘Push your arm through the sleeve’.

When your child can almost dress himself (usually from three years and up), you can check whether he understands the steps by asking, ‘What’s the first thing you need to put on?’ If he can’t remember, you can help him get started by reminding him.

Getting dressed: teaching the steps backwards

A good way to teach your child how to get dressed is to break down each task into small steps and teach her the last step first. Once your child can do the last step of the task, teach her the second-last step, then the third-last step and so on.

For example, when putting on shorts, you might help your child face the shorts the right way, hold the waistband and put his legs through the leg holes. Then teach your child the last step – pulling up the shorts to his waist by himself.

Once your child can do this, teach her to put her legs through the leg holes and pull her shorts up. You can keep working your way backwards through the steps until your child has mastered them all and can put her shorts on for herself.

A big advantage of this approach is that often the most rewarding thing about a task is getting it finished – and your child gets to this reward sooner when he can do the last step first.

If your child is having trouble, it can be tempting to jump in to help. But give your child a chance to work it out for herself, and cheer her on as she tries – she’ll get a real confidence boost when she does it on her own. Step in only when your child really needs your help.

Tips for helping your child learn to get dressed

If you can be positive and supportive, your child is more likely to cooperate. So a lot of praise will go a long way, even if your child has put his pants on backwards! Here are some practical tips to help.

Making time

  • Allow a realistic amount of time for getting dressed.
  • If you’re often rushed in the morning, try choosing clothes with your child the night before.
  • When you’re in a hurry, let your child do the easy tasks and help her with the difficult tasks.
  • Practise getting dressed when you and your child aren’t in a hurry or tired.

Choosing appropriate clothes

  • Let your younger child choose from a couple of options, like two t-shirts. Older or more mature children might be able to choose their own clothing.
  • Talk about the weather when you and your child are choosing clothes. Ask your child whether it’s hot or cold, raining or sunny.
  • Teach your child the difference between dirty and clean clothes – for example, ‘Dirty clothes go in the laundry basket. You can wear them again when they’re back in the drawer’. You can use some simple guidelines, like wearing clean underwear and socks every day.

Making it easier

  • Have your child sit down for dressing tasks. Sitting on the floor might be easier than sitting on a chair or bed for some children.
  • Store clothing in drawers and cupboards that your child can get to easily. Label clothing drawers with a picture or word to describe the clothing that’s in the drawer.
  • Wear clothes that have clear front and back clues – for example, a picture on the front and a tag on the back.
  • Teach undressing first – it’s easier than dressing. Being able to undress by himself will boost your child’s confidence.

Tying up shoelaces is a skill that most five-year-olds are still learning. Our handy illustrated guide to tying shoelaces outlines some easy steps for teaching your child this skill.

Teaching children with disability or developmental delay to get dressed

Some children with disability or developmental delays can have trouble getting dressed. Some children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have sensory sensitivities that make it hard for them to cope with the texture of different materials on their skin.

If you’re having trouble teaching your child with disability or development delay to get dressed, an occupational therapist who works specifically with children might be able to help. OTs can give you strategies to teach your child to dress, or suggest equipment that can make the process easier.

Development of skills for getting dressed

Here’s a rough guide to dressing skills at different ages. Keep in mind that every child is different and will develop skills at different rates.

At one year children can usually:

  • hold their arms out for sleeves and put their feet up for shoes
  • push their arms through sleeves and legs through pants
  • pull socks and shoes off.

At two years children can usually:

  • take off unfastened coats
  • take off shoes when the laces are untied
  • help push down pants
  • find armholes in t-shirts.

At 2½ years children can usually:

  • pull down pants with elastic waists
  • try to put on socks
  • put on front-buttoned shirts, without doing up buttons
  • unbutton large buttons.

At three years children can usually:

  • put on t-shirts with little help
  • put on shoes without fastening – they might put them on the wrong feet
  • put on socks – they might have trouble getting their heels in the right place
  • pull down pants by themselves
  • zip and unzip without joining or separating zippers
  • take off t-shirts without help
  • button large front buttons.

At four years children can usually:

  • take off t-shirts by themselves
  • buckle shoes or belts
  • connect jacket zippers and zip them up
  • put on socks the right way
  • put on shoes with little help
  • know the front and back of clothing.

At 4½ years children can usually:

  • step into pants and pull them up
  • thread belts through buckles.

At five years children can usually:

  • dress without your help or supervision
  • put on t-shirts or jumpers the right way each time.

Getting Rid of Static on Clothes

Getting rid of static involves making small alterations or additions to your environment or your clothes. Using a good quality fabric conditioner will help reduce static electricity in your clothes, and there are other strategies you can try, as well.

With solutions ranging from home humidifiers to fabric softeners, try these methods to remove static from clothes:

  1. Applying body moisturiser prevents clothing from rubbing against dry skin and creating unwanted sparks
  2. Use a dryer sheet – adding an anti-static tumble dryer sheet to the machine stops clothes from rubbing together and electrons from building up
  3. Touch grounded metal – touching any piece of grounded metal (like water pipes or a lamppost) will banish static from your clothes
  4. Anti-static sprays are available on the high street. Designed for application on clothes or the body, these products are an effective solution
  5. Boost the humidity within the home as very dry air is an ideal condition for static electricity, using a humidifier can eliminate the problem

For years now, I have been a veritable static machine, followed everywhere I go by clingy clothes, floating hair and enough periodic micro-shocks to power a small general hospital. And as someone who’s never been particularly keen on “science” or “understanding the reasons things happen,” I’ve never actually taken the time to figure out how to get rid of static cling. Instead, I’ve simply treated it as a mystery of nature and flat-out accepted that I’m prone to what I assume is just the air hating me more than most people.

The only culprit I’ve ever been able to pin-point? My luxurious mane. I have an exciting combo of hair that is both pretty long and incredibly fine. Before you ask, it’s extremely hard to maintain and has incurred a mountain of judgment, wrath and genuine distress from every hairdresser I’ve ever seen. That, combined with unintentionally upsetting some sort of Static Demon years ago (my best guess), means that I’m pretty constantly in static cling distress. In dry winters, I’ve developed a pure muscle-memory instinct to brace for shocks before touching my car door, any cats in the area or (unfortunately) my boyfriend. I keep my hair under a hat or in a tight bun where it can’t escape and potentially harm innocent bystanders. In other words, for all intents and purposes, I am the physical embodiment of static electricity for a good portion of the year.

Never once did it occur to me there was a solution for static cling—other than just kind of shrugging and accepting being cursed for the rest of my life. But it turns out there are a number of solutions online that don’t require anything other than a few common household items. I wondered—Carrie Bradshaw-style—could any of these everyday objects help me out of my staticky situation? I decided to test a few of these home remedies out for myself and see if any of them could free me from my clingy, shocky prison. And spoiler alert: A handful actually did.

1. Water

Before perusing the internet, I turned to my mom to see what static cling remedies she recommended. She suggested flicking a little water on myself—a strategy that’s backed up by a bunch of sources online, and one that seems pretty obvious in hindsight. With mom wisdom in mind and hope in my heart, I set out to sprinkle water all over myself.

This strategy to get rid of static cling definitely worked. And as a bonus, it was totally free and didn’t require tracking down some bizarre piece of 1920s domestic life (safety pins—who has those?!). The only con here is that while water neutralizes the static pretty instantly, it can wear off pretty quickly. And if you’re as staticky as I am, this can mean a few too many trips to the sink.

2. A Metal Hanger

A lot of sources recommended running a metal clothes hanger over your clothes to discharge static cling on clothing. This sounds a lot like science, and I was very prone to trust it—but somehow, I couldn’t get it to work for me. I expected to hear some magical metallic crackling and be left completely cling-free, but instead, I was left exactly as staticky as I had come.

3. Dryer Sheets

Here’s something that might have immediately occurred to you upon reading this heading: Dryer sheets? Not super convenient, especially considering the going recommendation is to keep them in your pockets at all times. (I’m all for instant access, but I’m never going to stuff my skinny jeans with dryer sheets.)

These failed the home test and didn’t do much to alleviate The Cling. Thankfully, this meant I didn’t have to go full Bag Lady and carry them around everywhere with me. But also sort of unthankfully, because I did have to walk all the way to Rite Aid to buy dryer sheets for this static cling experiment.

Ah, well, at least I didn’t have to excuse myself from any conversations to casually rub myself down with a little sheet.

4. Homemade Static Guard

A few places recommend mixing in a capful of fabric softener with a spray bottle full of water and treating yourself to a little spritz when you’re getting clingy. This worked pretty well and lasted a long time—a whole afternoon free from static from one round of spritzes!—but the tradeoff is that you might, if you’re like me, forget to adjust the nozzle and get a little more than just a light splash.

On the plus side, though, it did leave me smelling aggressively fresh.

5. Hairspray

This was a solid, if distinct, second to the ol’ homemade static guard, in terms of static banishing. The only big difference between the two is that at the end of this one I smelled like a beauty pageant instead of like fresh laundry. I’d recommend it for spot treating in small quantities (it’s less volatile than a squirt bottle), but it shouldn’t be your go-to if you find yourself in a battle to the death with non-stop static cling. (Unless you’re a big fan of the smell of hairspray for some reason. In which case, go nuts.)

6. Lotion

I was pretty not amped about lathering up with lotion to combat my static problem—mostly because feeling slimy is about as desirable as being shocky. But in reality, it only took a little lotion on my hands to rid me of static—even in my hair—for a fairly long time. So long, in fact, that it actually ruined my attempts to get re-staticky so I could test more solutions. So you could say it was helpful to an inconvenient degree.

TL;DR? If you suffer from unfair amounts of static electricity, like I do, reach for some lotion, grab some hairspray or take some time playing Mad Scientist and whip up your own fabric softener and water solution. Definitely don’t bother with dryer sheets or hangers. And if you’re in a pinch, remember your good ol’ pal h2o.

A version of this story was originally published in December 2014.

  1. Increase humidity in your home. In our little science lesson, we learned that static cling is lessened when the air is humid. Adding a humidifier or plants to a home will increase humidity and reduce static cling. One simple way to increase humidity is to stop using a clothes dryer and allow your clothes to air dry on an indoor drying rack or clothesline.
  2. Increase humidity in your clothes. Rather than letting your clothes dry completely in the dryer, take them out while still slightly damp. You’ll find less static cling, and you’ll be saving money on energy. As an added plus, you’ll reduce the number of wrinkles in your clothes.
  3. Separate and conquer. Before drying clothes, separate natural fiber fabrics from synthetic fiber fabrics. There will be less static cling. If possible, air dry synthetics, which are typically the chief culprit in static cling.
  4. Air dry clothes. The tumbling action of the dryer causes fabrics to rub against each other and build up electrostatic charges. Hanging clothes to dry on a drying rack or from hangers will eliminate this problem.
  5. Use fabric softeners or dryer sheets or bars. Fabric softeners that are used in the rinse cycle of the washer lubricate fabrics with chemicals that make them feel silkier and create less friction to the touch. Dryer sheets emit the same substances, activated by the heat of the dryer, to coat the surfaces of the fabrics. Dryer sheets are more effective than fabric softeners in reducing static cling because they work where the electrostatic problems are created. These non-woven fabric sheets are coated with a liquid surfactant that is activated by heat. One side of the surfactant molecule has a positively charged atom that bonds loosely to the surface of negatively charged fabrics. The other side of the surfactant molecule is a long-chain, fatty material that leaves a slightly oily coating the surface of the fabric preventing static buildup.
  6. Wear leather-soled shoes. Choose leather-soled shoes over rubber soles if you are plagued by static cling. Leather soles allow electricity to freely flow through your body after contact with a build-up of electrons, rather than rubber soles which will lock it in one place.

I live in a very dry state, so I’m no stranger to dealing with static on my clothes and hair. It’s not necessarily a harmful issue, but it can be really annoying. No one wants to deal with overly clingy clothes or frizzed up hair that just won’t stay put! But the good news is that there are plenty of quick and simple ways to get rid of static buildup, especially when it comes to your clothes. And I wanted to share a few of those tips with you today!

I’ll start by sharing five tips for preventing static from building up on your clothes in the first place. Many of them deal with the way you wash and dry your clothes, as that is where most static issues start. After that, I’ll share seven easy ways to get rid of static on your clothes if it’s already an issue. These tips will help you eliminate static issues in no time! So without any further ado, let’s get started! 🙂

5 Ways To Prevent Static Buildup

1. Use Fabric Softener

Using fabric softener on your clothes is a tried-and-true way to keep them static-free! Just add store-bought or homemade fabric softener to your wash cycle. You can also use fabric softener to make your own homemade dryer sheets that will help prevent static buildup during the dry cycle.

Related: These Amazing Dryer Sheets Are So Cheap And Easy To Make

2. Air Dry

Another way to prevent static buildup is to take your clothes out of the dryer while they are still a bit damp. Lay them flat or hang them to dry the rest of the way, and you won’t have any static issues.

3. Rinse With Vinegar

Vinegar is a great natural fabric softener, and it can help eliminate static issues when used in your laundry. Just add about a cup of white vinegar to the rinse cycle when you’re washing your clothes.

4. Use A Humidifier

Static can form if your laundry room itself is too dry. Keep your laundry room more humid by running a humidifier whenever you’re using the dryer.

5. Wool Dryer Balls

Using wool dryer balls (or even a few new tennis balls) during your dry cycles can help cut back on the amount of static on your clothes. If you find that they don’t eliminate all the static, combine it with the vinegar rinse described above. The combination will eliminate static and help your clothes dry faster! Learn how to make your own dryer balls at the link below.

Related: Putting These In Your Dryer Will Save You Time And Money

7 Ways To Get Rid Of Static On Your Clothes

1. Use A Dryer Sheet

Rub a dryer sheet over your clothes to help reduce static cling.

2. Apply Moisturizer

Apply a moisturizer or lotion to your skin where your clothes seem to be clinging. Static needs a dry environment, so adding moisture to your skin will help get rid of it.

3. Use a Wire Hanger

Run the flat part of a wire coat hanger over staticky clothes. The wire will attract the electricity and pull it away from the fabric.

4. Touch Grounded Metal

This is a classic tactic for dealing with static buildup. Just touch some sort of grounded metal, and the electricity will discharge leaving you static-free. (The shock may be a little unpleasant, but it’s quick and effective!)

5. Freeze Your Clothes

Put your clothes in the freezer for about 15 minutes before putting them on. The brief time in the freezer will introduce enough moisture to your clothes that it will eliminate any static present.

6. Use Wet Hands

Another simple way to eliminate static is by getting your hands wet and brushing them over your clothes. This method works with most fabrics, but avoid using it when wearing fabrics that don’t respond well to water, such as silk.

7. Use Hairspray

Spray a light amount of hairspray onto your clothes before putting them on. This quick trick works like a charm to eliminate static!

I may include affiliate links to products sold by others, but only when they are relevant and helpful. I always offer my own genuine recommendation. Learn more.

Hi, I’m Jillee!

I believe we should all love the place we call home and the life we live there. Since 2011, I’ve been dedicated to making One Good Thing by Jillee a reliable and trustworthy resource for modern homemakers navigating the everyday challenges of running a household. Join me as I share homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make life easier so you can enjoy it more!

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Homekeeping Laundry

How Do I Get Rid of Static?

Q. What can I do to remove static from my clothes and hair?
Patricia Gilbreath
Albertville, Alabama
A. Static occurs when electric charges accumulate on fabrics that are rubbing together, especially in a dry environment. To get rid of static from the get-go, throw a dryer sheet in the machine with clothing, or minimize fabrics’ contact with one another by adding a few dryer balls. You could also try placing a damp washcloth or towel in the dryer with clothes, which will help keep the air from becoming too dry; use the lowest heat setting for about 10 minutes. If you still get a little static, try removing the clothes before they are completely dry. Warning: Do not try this with wool or wool-blend items, since overdrying these fabrics can lead to garment damage.
To get rid of cling on clothes you’re wearing, especially those made of delicate fabrics like silk, glide a wire or metal hanger between your clothing and your body to remove the electric charge. Or rub a small amount of water or lotion on your hands and then lightly run them over your hair or legs to add a bit of moisture.

Static cling is a huge problem at our house.

2 of my girls wear fleece sleepers/pajamas to bed and they create quite a bit of static. Work-out wear, socks, and polyester are all big static producers at the Hill House also.

Recently when I folded clothes, the static seemed to get worse! Which got me thinking: I’m not totally sure I understand what static cling is or where it comes from. So I can’t eliminate it until I understand it. And of course, the internet came through for me.

There’s even a whole website dedicated to static cling. What Is Static Cling reports:

From the above, it can be summarized that static cling occurs if the following conditions are fulfilled:

  • When there is friction between two materials
  • The two materials are not the same but are electrically insulating
  • Dry conditions exist with humidity at very low levels (this is conducive to the transferring of electrons)

So according to their explanation, the dryer is the perfect place for the creation of static cling. The materials are not the same and there is an enormous amount of friction.

So how do you get rid of Static Cling?

This post contains affiliate links. Please see my disclosure policy for more information.

There are a few methods to rid your clothes of static, some green and some more traditional. Regardless of your preference, here are some ways to reduce the annoying static in your laundry.

→ Traditional Fabric Softeners
You know the ones: Downy, Bounce, Snuggle and others. Fabric softeners come in the liquid form you pour into the final rinse of the washing cycle or they come as a sheet you put in the dryer. They leave your clothes smelling nice and dreamy and are excellent at keeping static at bay. The problem? They get a bad rap for being potentially toxic.

→ Any type of Dryer Balls
Dryer Balls come in the form of wool or plastic. I understand that people rave about the wool ones…but not so much about the plastic ones. After reading many reviews online, it seems that their best claim to fame is that they keep the clothes separated in the dryer. This one characteristic goes a long way in reducing static (re-read the ‘how static forms’ at top of post). Whether they interfere with the actual electrical charge is not well-proven.

→ Aluminum Foil and Tennis Balls
Again, these items separate the clothes in the dryer, thus helping to prevent static cling. I’ve tried them both and I would say that there is a significant reduction in static cling, but definitely not an elimination of The Cling. But both items are relatively cheap, so they might be worth a try for you!

→ Static Guard
If you’d prefer to deal with static cling after the laundry is dried, you can try this spray-on product. It claims to “instantly eliminate and prevent static cling.” It works remarkably well in my limited experience with the product. The only problem is that you must use it to address each article of clothing, rather than dealing with the entire load of clingy clothes at once.

→ Line-drying
Drying your clothes on the clothes line (or inside drying rack) practically eliminates the problem altogether. It is rare that any item I line dry has the static cling. Just another reason to line dry your clothing items instead of tumbling them in the dryer!

→ White Vinegar
Lots of Mama’s Laundry Talk readers swear by white vinegar as a fabric softener. For loads of laundry that are mostly cottons (bed sheets, towels, jeans) I use vinegar faithfully. But for those loads where fleece or polyester is involved, I need something with a little more punch. I do love that it is inexpensive and chemical-free.

▶ Make sure you don’t miss Why White Vinegar Should Be in Your Laundry Room

→ Hairspray
I know it seems like a weird choice, but cheap hairspray lightly sprayed on hair and clothes can be a quick fix. Barely spray on your clothes and let it dry.

→ Rub a Dryer Sheet on your hair and clothes
When you’re fully dressed, take a dryer sheet (Bounce, Cling-Free, Snuggle, any will do) and lightly rub it on your clothes and hair. This treatment yields the best results for us here at the Hill House.

So how do you get rid of static cling? Any of the above recommendations? Or do you have your own secret weapon against static cling? Do tell.

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Most recent

Looking for a more environmentally-friendly laundry routine, but can’t find a good way to reduce static cling without using dryer sheets?

In need of a natural alternative to toxic dryer sheets? The following tips should do the trick. Photo courtesy of

Separating oneself from these sheets, which are made with a dangerous assortment of carcinogenic chemicals, is not easy. Luckily, there are simple green alternatives that work just as well.

According to diy Natural, here are seven natural ways to reduce static in the laundry:

1. Hang Dry

The best natural way to eliminate static in laundry is to hang dry everything. Now that spring is approaching, it should be a little easier for most to take advantage of drying clothes outdoors or in front of an open window. When hung to dry, clothes are no longer rubbing together to create static electricity.

Whether hanging it outdoors or indoors, there are several options. Laundry enthusiasts can build their own outdoor clothesline, use a compact outdoor model that folds up (and can be taken out of the ground) when not in use or dry indoors using a large rack or a smaller model.

When hang drying isn’t an option and a dryer must be used, there are still several natural methods for keeping static down.

Synthetic fabrics like nylon and polyester are one of the main culprits of static cling. When dried separately, garments made from synthetic fabrics aren’t given the opportunity to charge up all the other clothing. Consider pulling synthetic fabrics out of the wash and hanging them on an indoor or outdoor rack instead of throwing them in the dryer with everything else.

Another common cause of static in the laundry is over-drying. When items are completely dry and no moisture remains, this invites static electricity into the mix. Allow clothes to dry only until they’re not wet anymore—tumbling around for excessive amounts of time in the dry heat increases static and increases energy costs.

Diy Natural’s homemade fabric softener is made with vinegar. It actually serves double duty as fabric softener and static reducer in the laundry. When used in the rinse cycle of the wash, most users will see a reduction in static cling after clothes go through the dryer. Even if planning to hang dry items, there’s no need to worry about them smelling like vinegar. When items are completely dry the vinegar smell will completely vanish.

Wool dryer balls are an excellent alternative to fabric softeners and dryer sheets. These little wool balls absorb moisture from clothing in the dryer, maintaining a more humid environment and, therefore, cutting down on static.

In addition to reducing static, they also reduce drying time and fluff clothes. Diy Natural recommends using six or more in the dryer for best results.

Using white vinegar in the dryer is another great trick for eliminating static. Simply spray a clean washcloth, sock, pre-cut piece of cloth or any other garment with vinegar. This item is then tossed into the dryer with everything else. The vinegar in the dryer will keep static down—and remember, the vinegar smell will be gone once things are dry.

Soap nuts can be used as a green alternative to commercial laundry detergents. They’re actually a type of berry, and can be put in a muslin bag and tossed directly into the wash. (They can also be boiled down to make a liquid laundry soap). They already possess anti-static properties, so laundry that’s washed with soap nuts doesn’t require any other anti-static remedy.

Visit EcoWatch’s HEALTH and pages for more related news on this topic.

8 Natural Ways to Reduce Static Cling in The Laundry

Learn how to get rid of static cling naturally, without the use of harsh, expensive chemicals. These 8 simple and effective solutions will surprise you.

Are you trying to “green” your laundry routine, but still wondering how to get rid of static cling without using dryer sheets?

This is a common issue among our readers, and I can empathize. Dryer sheets used to be one of my favorite things and were hard to give up when I couldn’t find anything else that worked. But after learning about the dangerous bouquet of chemicals used to make dryer sheets, I determined to find alternatives that worked just as well.

These chemicals end up on our clean laundry and then on our skin. Studies show the numerous toxic ingredients used in scented laundry products like dryer sheets. These studies state some ingredients contain known carcinogens. (source)

Static can be an absolute non-issue in your natural laundry routine if you follow some of our following tips!

How to Get Rid of Static Cling Naturally

1. Hang Dry Your Clothes

When people ask me how to get rid of static cling, I always tell them that the BEST natural way to completely eliminate static in your laundry is to hang dry everything. Obviously, it’s easier to dry clothes outdoors or in front of an open window, but even hanging them out in the cold seasons is beneficial. When hung to dry, clothes are no longer rubbing together to create static electricity.

Whether hanging it outdoors or indoors, you have several options. You can build your own outdoor clothesline, use a compact outdoor model that folds up (and can be taken out of the ground) when not in use, or dry indoors using a large rack or a smaller model.

When hang drying isn’t an option, and a dryer must be used, there are still several natural methods for how to get rid of static cling.

2. Dry Synthetic Fabrics Separately

Synthetic fabrics like nylon and polyester are one of the main culprits of static cling. Dry them separately to avoid static on all your other clothing. Consider pulling synthetic fabrics out of the wash and hanging them on an indoor or outdoor rack instead of throwing them in the dryer with everything else.

3. Reduce Drying Time

Another common cause of static in the laundry is over-drying. When items are completely dry and no moisture remains, this invites static electricity into the mix. Allow clothes to dry and nothing more. Excessive tumbling around in the dry heat increases static and increases your energy costs.

4. Vinegar Fabric Softener

Our homemade fabric softener is made with vinegar. It actually serves double duty as fabric softener AND static reducer in the laundry. When used in the rinse cycle of the wash, most people will see a reduction in static cling after clothes go through the dryer. Even if you plan to hang dry items, you won’t need to worry about them smelling like vinegar. When items are completely dry the vinegar smell will completely vanish. If you’re wondering how to get rid of static cling, this is a great place to start.

If you haven’t yet looked into wool dryer balls as an alternative to fabric softeners and dryer sheets, you really should. These little wool balls absorb moisture from clothing in the dryer, maintaining a more humid environment, thus helping you get rid of static cling.

In addition to reducing static, they also reduce drying time and fluff clothes. We recommend using 6 or more in the dryer for best results. You can learn how to make wool dryer balls or purchase them here. (We recommend buying 2 four packs.)

6. Vinegar in the Dryer

Using white vinegar in the dryer is another great trick for eliminating static. You can simply spray a clean washcloth, sock, pre-cut piece of cloth, or any other garment with vinegar. This item is then tossed into the dryer with everything else. The vinegar in the dryer will keep static down – and remember, the vinegar smell will be gone once things are dry.

7. Soap Nuts

Soap nuts can be used as a green alternative to commercial laundry detergents. They’re actually a type of berry and can be put in a muslin bag and tossed directly into the wash. (They can also be boiled down to make liquid laundry soap.) They already possess anti-static properties, so laundry that’s washed with soap nuts doesn’t require any other anti-static remedy.

Don’t know what soap nuts are? Read all about them here.

8. Aluminum Foil Ball

When first learning how to get rid of static cling I had great success with aluminum foil balls. Since then I have discovered all these other natural methods for reducing static.

Tin foil doesn’t contain chemical fragrances like dryer sheets. I recommend trying this to get rid of static cling after trying the other methods. To use, simply tear off a sheet of aluminum foil, roll it into a ball, and add it to the dryer. The same ball will last several loads and will become a nice, smooth ball after 1-2 loads. Replace when you notice it’s no longer working.

Do you know how to get rid of static cling in your laundry? What natural methods have you found work well?

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