Slow cooker goulash recipe

Probably the most well-known Hungarian dish – this slow cooked Hungarian beef goulash is hearty, warming and so delicious. Slow cooked for fall-apart tenderness.

I thought it was time to pull this one out of the archives again as it’s so flippin good.

Tender chunks of beef in a thick tomato and pepper sauce – spiced with beautiful smoky paprika (don’t go easy on the paprika now – this stew can take plenty).

I’ll happily admit – this isn’t a 100% authentic goulash. Traditional goulash, I’m told, is more of a soup that doesn’t rely on flour for thickening. According to Wiki, tomato is also a fairly modern addition.

There seems to be a number of Hungarian and non-Hungarian variations out there (according to Gundel’s Hungarian cookbook) some using beans, wine, flour, potatoes and some are extremely simple.

This is my version, passed down to me from my dad, which I think he got from his dad (I must ask him that!).

I like to add slices of bell pepper, then serve with pappardelle pasta and lots of sour cream.

Other accompaniment ideas for Goulash:

  • Boiled or fried rice
  • Egg noodles
  • The smoky wedges from this post
  • Creamy mashed potato (if serving with mash then swap out the peppers for mushrooms)

So versatile, it’s worth making a double batch and serving it with different accompaniments two days running.

I’ve been making this Slow-Cooked Hungarian Beef Goulash for years, and I’m usually clamouring to get my dutch oven out as soon as the first leaves start to turn golden on the trees.

I love making stews in a dutch oven (<– affiliate link) as I find they seem to thicken a little better. Also, the initial browning of the beef means the base of the pan gets covered in a dark brown crispy bits. It might seem a bit alarming at first (as it looks like it’s sticking), but a few minutes after pouring the stock and canned tomatoes in and you’ll find you can stir all of those bits into the goulash – which results in a richer flavour.

I love how the sauce bubbles away and splashes the sides of the pan as it’s cooking in the oven. It WILL look dark and covered in well-cooked sauce when it comes out, but you’ve got to admit – it does look pretty inviting:

Although I used my dutch oven pan for this, you can also use a slow cooker. Simply fry everything off up to step 3, reduce the amount of stock by half a cup, and cook on medium for 4-5 hours or low for 5-7 hours.

Love cooking with your Dutch Oven? Here are some more recipes you can use it for:

  • Slow Cooked Beef Massaman Curry – Rich, fall-apart slow cooked beef curry in a spicy homemade sauce with new potatoes.
  • Beef Short Ribs – Fall-apart beef served with a rich and meaty red wine gravy – I cook this in the slow cooker, but also include Dutch Oven instructions
  • Big Batch Chinese Beef – A tasty, make-ahead meal of slow-cooked saucy Chinese beef.
  • This Spicy Pork Ramen Noodle Soup dish…..oh boy. It’s takes a little effort, but it’s so worth it!
  • Chris’s famous Chilli Con Carne

The Slow-Cooked Hungarian Beef Goulash Recipe:

Probably the most well-known Hungarian dish – goulash is hearty, warming and so delicious. 4.86 from 7 votes Pin The Recipe For Later Prep Time: 30 mins Cook Time: 4 hrs 15 mins Total Time: 4 hrs 45 mins Course: Dinner Cuisine: British, Hungarian Keyword: autumn, Casserole, Comfort Food, homemade, winter Servings: 8 portions Author: Nicky Corbishley

  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 lb (900g) beef braising steak, cut into bite-size chunks
  • 2 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 brown onions peeled and diced
  • 2 fat cloves garlic peeled and minced
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • 2 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp smoked paprika just use regular if you don’t have smoked
  • large pinch of salt and pepper
  • 28 oz (800g/two tins) canned chopped tomatoes in juice
  • 2 1/4 cups (600ml) hot beef stock (water plus 2 stock cubes is fine)
  • 1 tbsp honey optional – this is just to neutralize some of the acidity from the tomatoes
  • 2 red bell peppers deseeded and sliced
  • 1 cup (225ml) sour cream

To Serve:

  • Cooked pasta – such as pappardelle, tagliatelle or penne
  • handful of chopped parsley
  • Extra sour cream

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 170C/325F. Heat up the oil in your dutch oven or oven-friendly casserole dish. Dredge the beef in the flour, salt and pepper and fry in 2-3 batches until well-browned. Once browned, remove from the pan and place in a bowl.
  • Turn down the heat and place the onions in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes, stirring (try to scrape up a some of the brown bits that may have stuck to the bottom of the pan. Keep the heat low to ensure it doesn’t burn). Add in the garlic and tomato puree, stir, then add the beef back in.
  • Sprinkle the beef with the paprika, salt and pepper and stir to coat, then pour in the canned tomatoes, beef stock and honey. Stir and bring to a simmer. Once simmering, scrape up any bits from the bottom of the pan and stir. Then place a lid on and place in the oven to cook for 3 hours 30 minutes.
  • Check and stir 2 or 3 times during cooking to ensure nothing is sticking and that there is still plenty of liquid (you can add a splash of water if needed).
  • After 3 and 1/2 hours, add in the peppers, stir and put back in the oven for 30 minutes.
  • Take out of the oven, stir, then swirl the soured cream on top, sprinkle with parsley and serve with pasta and extra sour cream.

Recipe Notes

Can I make Goulash in a slow cooker?

Yes. Simply fry everything off up to step 3, reduce the amount of stock by half a cup, and cook on medium for 4-5 hours or low for 5-7 hours.

Can I make this ahead?

Yes, cook the goulash, then cool, cover and refrigerate for up to two days. Reheat on the hob or in the oven at 170c/325f for 25-30 minutes (covered) stirring occasionally, until piping hot throughout.

Can I freeze Goulash?

Yes, cook the goulash, then cool, cover and freeze. Defrost in the refrigerator overnight, then reheat on the hob or in the oven at 170c/325f for 25-30 minutes (covered) stirring occasionally, until piping hot throughout. Nutritional information is per serving, not including the serving suggestions of pasta and extra soured cream.

Nutritional Information

Nutrition Facts Slow-Cooked Hungarian Beef Goulash Amount Per Serving Calories 462 Calories from Fat 297 % Daily Value* Fat 33g51% Saturated Fat 16g80% Cholesterol 94mg31% Sodium 548mg23% Potassium 815mg23% Carbohydrates 18g6% Fiber 4g16% Sugar 10g11% Protein 23g46% Vitamin A 2610IU52% Vitamin C 50.2mg61% Calcium 101mg10% Iron 4.4mg24% * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Tried this recipe?Mention @KitchenSanctuary or tag #kitchensanctuary on Instagram!

Equipment:

In order to make this Hungarian Beef Goulash recipe you will need:

    • A good Kitchen knife. I have recently bought this Dalstrong one and love it.
    • Chopping Board
    • Garlic Press
    • Casserole pan
    • Measuring Spoons
    • Measuring Jug
    • Wooden or Silicon Coated Spoons. We have just bought these and love them.

This recipe was first posted in December 2015. Updated in August 2019 with added tips and for general housekeeping.

I first made this recipe on Lucy’s gorgeous Craftberry Bush blog a few years back. If you haven’t seen her site already, I’d definitely recommend checking it out – she’s got so many gorgeous craft ideas, and you should see her Christmas home tours – totally jaw dropping!

Some of the links in this post are affiliate links – which means if you buy the product I get a small commission (at no extra cost to you). If you do buy, then thank you! That’s what helps us to keep Kitchen Sanctuary running. The nutritional information provided is approximate and can vary depending on several factors. For more information please see our Terms & Conditions.

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Hungarian goulash is similar to a soup or stew, depending on the thickness of your liquids, and usually contains a large amount of paprika. Jump to Recipe 5 from 3 votes

Growing up, goulash was not a meal that was served in my home, let alone Hungarian Goulash. My parents are both British and goulash just wasn’t a dish they were familiar with. After I got married, I was introduced to the Americanized version of goulash that consists of ground beef, lots of green pepper and a tomato sauce which was served over macaroni noodles. I actually know this as a dish pretty similar to chili mac.

Hungarian Goulash Recipe

After doing a little searching, I’ve found that over the years goulash has been adapted in many forms and it’s different for everyone. Hungarian goulash is similar to a soup or stew, depending on the thickness of your liquids, and usually contains a large amount of paprika.

The thing that really caught my eye was that it was made with beef chuck roast, not ground beef.

I’ve always loved a good stew and was totally ready to give this a try. I didn’t want to offend any Hungarians out there, so I did my research. I used the basic ingredients of Hungarian Goulash and adapted it to my tastes, which is what it seems everyone does as there are so many different versions!

For Hungarian Goulash you will need:

  • 2 pounds beef chuck roast cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/4 cup sweet paprika
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 2 teaspoons dried marjoram
  • 2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 heaping tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion chopped
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic about two cloves
  • 1 14- ounce can fire roasted diced tomatoes undrained
  • 3 cups beef broth
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 medium carrots cut into 1/2″ pieces
  • 3 medium parsnips cut into 1/2″ pieces
  • 5 oz sweet peppers chopped
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • Egg noodles

Helpful kitchen tools:

  • Crockpot
  • Skillet
  • Measuring spoons
  • Liquid measuring cup

How to Make Hungarian Goulash

There’s a small amount of prep work involved before dropping everything into the slow cooker.

  1. First, you’ll need to cut your chuck roast into 1-inch pieces.
  2. Next, combine herbs, spices, salt, pepper and flour in a gallon sized zipper plastic bag.
  1. Add the cubed meat to the bag, seal and shake to coat.
  1. Meanwhile, sauté the onion and garlic in the skillet, then add entire contents of meat shaking bag to the onion mixture. Do not discard any extra spice mixture in the bag, add it all to the skillet. Cook, turning occasionally until meat is browned well.
  1. Add canned tomatoes and its juices and stir. Turn off heat.
  1. Add meat mixture to the slow cooker crock, using a rubber spatula to ensure you get all of the sauce from the skillet.
  1. Add the beef broth and the Worcestershire sauce stir gently. Add the parsnips and carrots and stir. Cover and cook on high for 4-5 hours (or low for 6-8), or until meat and vegetables are tender.
  1. Add chopped sweet peppers during the last hour of cooking.
  2. Remove lid from slow cooker and turn up to high. Put a pot of water on the stove for your egg noodles and bring to a rolling boil.
  3. Remove about 1/4 cup of liquid from the slow cooker.
  1. In a medium bowl, measure out the cornstarch. Slowly add the liquid from the slow cooker to the cornstarch, stirring as you go. Only add small amounts at a time, stir, then add more. Adding the liquid all at once will cause your cornstarch to clump and it will be impossible to smooth out. Once you have added enough liquid to make the cornstarch mixture thin, add the cornstarch mixture to the slow cooker and stir. Allow the slow cooker to cook on high, uncovered, to thicken the stew while your egg noodles cook.
  1. Add your egg noodles to the boiling water and cook according to package directions. Drain and serve thickened goulash over cooked egg noodles.

Want more recipes for your slow cooker?

Try my crockpot mac and cheese and our favorite crockpot roast beef!

Slow Cooker Hungarian Goulash & Noodles

Hungarian goulash is similar to a soup or stew, depending on the thickness of your liquids, and usually contains a large amount of paprika. 5 from 3 votes Pin Recipe Course: Dinner Cuisine: Hungarian Keyword: crockpot, soup recipes, stew Prep Time: 20 mins Cook Time: 6 hrs Total Time: 6 hrs 20 mins Servings: 6 servings Calories: 485 Author: Amanda Formaro

  • 2 pounds beef chuck roast cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/4 cup sweet paprika
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 2 teaspoons dried marjoram
  • 2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 heaping tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion chopped
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic about two cloves
  • 1 14- ounce can fire roasted diced tomatoes undrained
  • 3 cups beef broth
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 medium carrots cut into 1/2″ pieces
  • 3 medium parsnips cut into 1/2″ pieces
  • 5 oz sweet peppers chopped
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • Egg noodles
  • Combine paprika, caraway seeds, marjoram, Kosher salt and black pepper in a large plastic zipper bag. Place cubed meat into the bag and close, then shake to coat.
  • Saute chopped onion in olive oil until tender, about 3-4 minutes. Add garlic and sauté another 30 seconds.
  • Add entire contents of meat shaking bag to the onion mixture in the skillet. Cook, turning occasionally until meat is browned well. Add canned tomatoes and its juices and stir. Turn off heat.
  • Add meat mixture to the slow cooker crock, using a rubber spatula to ensure you get all of the sauce from the skillet. Add the beef broth and the Worcestershire sauce stir gently. Add the parsnips and carrots and stir.
  • Cover and cook on high for 4-5 hours (or low for 6-8), or until meat and vegetables are tender. Add chopped sweet peppers during the last hour of cooking.
  • Remove lid from slow cooker and turn up to high. Put a pot of water on the stove for your egg noodles and bring to a rolling boil.
  • Remove about 1/4 cup of liquid from the slow cooker. In a medium bowl, measure out the cornstarch. Slowly add the liquid from the slow cooker to the cornstarch, stirring as you go. Only add small amounts at a time, stir, then add more. Adding the liquid all at once will cause your cornstarch to clump and it will be impossible to smooth out. Once you have added enough liquid to make the cornstarch mixture thin, add the cornstarch mixture to the slow cooker and stir. Allow the slow cooker to cook on high, uncovered, to thicken the stew while your egg noodles cook.
  • Add your egg noodles to the boiling water and cook according to package directions. Drain and serve thickened goulash over cooked egg noodles.

Notes

Over the years goulash has been adapted in many forms and it’s different for everyone. Hungarian goulash is similar to a soup or stew, depending on the thickness of your liquids, and usually contains a large amount of paprika.

Nutrition

Serving: 1portion | Calories: 485cal | Carbohydrates: 33g | Protein: 34g | Fat: 26g | Saturated Fat: 9g | Cholesterol: 104mg | Sodium: 1534mg | Potassium: 1420mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 12g | Vitamin A: 9922IU | Vitamin C: 55mg | Calcium: 121mg | Iron: 6mg Tried this Recipe? Pin it for Later!Mention @AmandaFormaro or tag #AmandasCookin!

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Amanda Formaro

President at Amanda’s Creative Studio, Inc. Amanda Formaro is the crafty, entrepreneurial mother of four grown children. She loves to bake, cook, make kid’s crafts and create decorative items for her home. She is a crafting expert and guru in the kitchen and has appeared online and in print publications many times over the years. She is also a craft book author five times over and product developer as well as the owner of FunFamilyCrafts.com. You can find her on social media by using the buttons to the left! Follow along

Latest posts by Amanda Formaro (see all)

  • Cheddar Cheese Potato Soup – January 30, 2020
  • Valentine’s Day Heart Cupcakes – January 28, 2020
  • Homemade Goulash – January 23, 2020

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Crockpot Goulash (Prep Time: Under 15 minutes!)

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When it comes to comfort food, pasta recipes are one of my favorites, and goulash is right at the top of that list! Of course, crockpot goulash has the added benefit of using the ever-handy slow cooker to decrease prep time and increase flavor!

This is one of my favorite crock pot pasta dishes. It’s hearty, super simple to make, and makes plenty to feed your hungry crew. The sauce assembles in under 15 minutes. Fast and fabulously delicious, crockpot goulash is one of those meals they’ll be requesting again and again!

Jump To…

Why It’s Great!Recipe NotesRecipe VariationsSimilar Recipes

What I Love About Crockpot Goulash Recipe

The slow cooker does the hard work to develop the flavor of the amazing sauce in this crockpot goulash recipe. That is only one of the reasons I love this recipe! No long simmer on the stove for a delicious sauce. Just fix it and forget it! A few other things that I think are fabulous about this recipe are:

  • Super quick prep for the sauce
  • Feeds a crowd
  • Simple to cook and assemble
  • Uses ingredients you probably have in your pantry

Recipe Notes

This is a very straightforward recipe. However, here are a few extra tips!

Drain the beef- I suggest pouring the meat onto several layers of paper towels after you have drained the majority of the grease out of the pan. Pat the meat dry with another paper towel before adding putting it back in the skillet to cook with the onion and garlic.

Cooking the Pasta– Make sure you use plenty of salty water to cook your pasta. It makes a huge difference in the texture and taste of the pasta. Also, make sure you reserve at least 1 cup of the pasta water. The extra starch and salt in the water add flavor, thicken, and help bind the pasta to the sauce!

Ingredient Notes

Pasta- I use elbow macaroni, but you can use any type of short cut pasta you like. I like to use pasta that has twists or bends in it, so it can hold on to the delicious sauce and really pack in the flavor with every bite!

Cook pasta separately- This allows you to build a thick sauce and also prevents you from overcooking the noodles. If you prepared the sauce with enough water to cook the noodles, it would turn out too thin! And if you’re not careful, you might end up with a pasta mushier than the snow lingering outside my window!

Cheese- I love cheddar cheese with pasta and tomato-based sauces. You can use any type of cheese that you like. Mozzarella, Parmesan, or any Italian blend of cheeses would work well too! Just know that hard cheeses like Parmesan will take a little longer to melt.

To bay or not to bay- Bay leaves are an age-old culinary debate. I’m a bay leaf fan and think they do add to sauces and soups. It’s a background, foundation flavor. It’s not flashy or overpowering, which is why I call for 3 in this recipe. If you’re not a fan or don’t have any, your dish won’t be wrecked without them, but I feel they definitely add depth to the sauce.

Storing Tips

As with all tomato-based sauces, I recommend storing in a well-sealed glass container. Plastic will work, but the sauce may stain the container.

Can You Freeze This?

The best way to freeze crockpot goulash is to freeze the cooked sauce. Let your goulash cool before freezing, use a proper container, label the container, and reheat the goulash within a few months for best results.

When you’re ready to serve, warm the sauce through and stir in freshly cooked pasta. You can also freeze leftovers of the completed dish. The noodles might get a little soft when reheating, but it will still be tasty!

Make Ahead Tips

You can certainly make this up to several days ahead of time. Cook the meat fully and combine the rest of the sauce ingredients. Cook as directed in the Crockpot on the day serving. You can either cook your pasta fresh that day or cook beforehand and store it separate from the sauce.

If you’re using pasta you’ve stored in the fridge, let it warm up on the counter or warm it on the stove before stirring into the warm sauce. Otherwise, you’ll have to allow time for the slow cooker warm everything up.

How Long Can You Keep This In The Fridge?

This will keep for about 3 days in the fridge.

Recipe Variations

Pasta and slow cooker recipes always seem to have lots of versions and variations. Crockpot goulash is no exception! I think it’s one of the best things about these kinds of recipes- you can’t make them wrong!

Can I Make This Into A Soup?

Goulash soup is a very common variation of goulash, particularly in Eastern Europe, and it sounds like a perfect fall treat! If you want to modify this recipe to make it more of a soup, I recommend adding 3-4 cups of beef broth until you get to the desired consistency. You might have to tweak the spices and other flavors if they become too diluted. Start slowly and go a little at a time.

This recipe is a fantastic foundation for soup, and you can add vegetables like carrots, celery, or zucchini for more textures and fill it out a bit.

What Other Goulash Recipe I Can Try?

My crockpot goulash is very much American Goulash. Hungarian Goulash typically uses chunks of meat, like chuck roast, vegetables, and either potatoes or dumplings. It’s a lot more stew-like than the American version.

The sauce has less Italian influence and focuses more on the tomato flavor and the smoky taste of Hungarian paprika. While they both bear the name goulash, they’re very different but equally yummy!

You can also try German goulash, that uses beef chunks and lesser veggies than other goulash recipes.

What Other Beefy Goulash I Can Try?

I love hearty, beefy goulash, and hamburger goulash, like this recipe, is my favorite. You can also change it up and use cut up chuck roast to make beef goulash. Simply cut into chunks and brown in a skillet with the onion and garlic before transferring to the slow cooker.

The large chunks of meat will intensify the beef flavor and satisfy any carnivore cravings! If you don’t have much time for a crockpot goulash, you can definitely try instant pot goulash!

Crockpot Goulash

Rich, meaty tomato sauce generously coats the pasta in this hearty Crockpot Goulash. The fix it & forget it meat sauce is yummy and super simple to make! Prep Time12 mins Cook Time3 hrs Total Time3 hrs 12 mins Servings: 8 Servings Author: Kathleen

  • 2 pounds ground beef, 80/20
  • 1 large onion chopped
  • 4 large cloves garlic minced
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 (15 ounce) cans tomato sauce
  • 2 (14.5 ounce) cans canned petite diced tomatoes juice included
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • ¼ teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons Italian seasoning
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 cups elbow pasta
  • 1 cup pasta cooking water
  • 2 cups extra sharp cheese, shredded
  • In a large skillet, brown the ground beef over medium-high heat, crumbling with as it cooks, until browned on both sites (It doesn’t have to be cooked all the way through). Remove excess oil.
  • Add onion and garlic to the beef and cook until the onions are translucent about 10 minutes. Transfer mixture to a large crockpot.
  • Add the water, tomato sauce, petite diced tomatoes with their juice, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, sugar, salt, pepper, Italian seasoning, Bay leaves and stir. Cover and cook on high 3-4 hours or low 7-8 hours.
  • Meanwhile, cook the pasta in well-salted water, according to package instructions. Reserve 1 cup of pasta water. Drain well then stir into crockpot. Add reserved pasta water 1/2 cup at a time to thin sauce slightly. Only add more pasta water if consistency needs adjusting. Sprinkle cheese over top and serve.

Serving: 1/8 of the recipe | Calories: 625kcal | Carbohydrates: 45g | Protein: 32g | Fat: 32g | Saturated Fat: 14g | Cholesterol: 110mg | Sodium: 2287mg | Potassium: 1114mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin A: 305IU | Vitamin C: 1.7mg | Calcium: 259mg | Iron: 3.5mg DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? I’D LOVE TO SEE!Tag @GonnaWantSeconds or #gonnawantseconds on Instagram! © Gonna Want Seconds. Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any social media/website/blog is strictly prohibited.

More Crock Pot Pasta Recipes

Let’s face it. Life is busy. Crock Pot Pasta Recipes can help you put hot, hearty meals on the table despite your busy schedule! I’ve got plenty of Crock Pot Pasta meals you and your family will love!

  • Crock Pot Mac And Cheese
  • Crockpot Lasagna
  • Crock Pot Spaghetti
  • Crockpot Chicken Noodle Soup
  • Crockpot Chicken And Noodles

Conclusion

I can’t think of better comfort food than crockpot goulash. You’re going to love the thick, rich, meaty tomato sauce that has just the right amount of seasoning. Your family will be crowded around when they hear goulash is on the menu! Be sure to let me know what you think in the comments!

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The Easiest Slow Cooker Beef Goulash Recipe

When you don’t have a ton of time on your hands to cook, you might be tempted to hit up the drive-thru or place a takeout order. It’s quick, convenient, tastes good, and you don’t have to worry about doing any dishes, right? Well, what if we told you there’s a way you can make a meal that not only tastes great, but requires minimal effort on your part and is healthy for you? Enter our hearty slow cooker beef goulash recipe.

Now, you might be thinking that a goulash—which is a meat and veggies stew—would require a lot of time, but our recipe is made for your slow cooker. All you have to do is combine all of the ingredients into it, and let the time-saving appliance work its magic while you do whatever it is you need to do. It’s that easy! Any dish that is made in a slow cooker is one we fully support, and this beef goulash recipe will leave you with plenty of leftovers you can eat during the week. Go ahead—dig in!

Nutrition: 378 calories, 12 g fat (5 g saturated), 559 mg sodium, 12 g sugar, 27 g protein, 9 g fiber

Makes 6 servings

Ingredients

1 pound 90% lean ground beef
21/2 cups reduced-sodium beef broth
8 ounces dried multigrain high-protein elbow macaroni (2 1/3 cups)
1 15-ounce can no-salt-added tomato sauce
1 14.5-ounce can no-salt-added diced tomatoes
1 6-ounce can no-salt-added tomato paste
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/2 cup shredded carrot
1/2 cup finely chopped green sweet pepper
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

How to Make It

  1. In a 5- to 6-quart slow cooker combine the first 11 ingredients (through pepper). Stir to break up the ground beef. Cover and cook on high 2 hours, stirring once halfway through cooking.
  2. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover and cook for 10 minutes more, or until the cheese is melted and the pasta is tender.

Eat This Tip

As a rule of thumb, your dinner plate should be made up of one part protein, one part starch, and two parts non-starchy vegetables. Pair this recipe with a salad!

RELATED: The easy way to make healthier comfort foods.

2.7/5 (235 Reviews)

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Slow Cooker Beef Goulash

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Beef Goulash is a great dish to combat those cold winter days. The name originates from the Hungarian word gulyás which means ‘herdsman’ where the stew was prepared by cattle herders and stockmen during their cattle drives. This thick, hearty stew which goes well with mashed potatoes, bread, rice or egg noodles.

There were so many different recipes for Beef Goulash out there, it was tough choosing a truly authentic recipe so I decided to settle with the basics and cultivate it to my tastes, but at the heart of the dish are several main ingredients that can be agreed upon: meat, onions and paprika.

This recipe is enough for 4 big servings but feel free to beef it up more with added vegetables such as potatoes, bell peppers or tomatoes. You can also skip the step of browning the beef to make it easier and avoid oil spatters.

Scale 1x2x3x

  • 3 lb. boneless beef chuck, cubed
  • 2 lb. onions, diced
  • 2 teaspoons garlic, minced
  • 4 cups beef stock
  • 3 tablespoons sweet paprika
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon marjoram
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 4 tablespoons tomato puree
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar / balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons corn starch
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  1. In a large bowl, coat the beef cubes with 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  2. Over medium high heat, brown the beef in batches with 2 tablespoons olive oil. Drain on paper towels and set aside
  3. In the same pan, saute onions and garlic with sugar until caramelized. Add more olive oil if needed. Deglaze the pan with vinegar
  4. Transfer meat and onions to a slow cooker and add remaining ingredients. Season with salt and pepper to taste
  5. Cover and cook over high heat for 4 hours or low heat for 8 hours
  6. Remove the bay leaves and add some cornstarch slurry if you prefer it thicker
  7. Dish and serve hot with bread, rice or egg noodles

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Converting a Polish Goulash recipe?

Unless the recipe is missing something, all I can see for liquids is the 1 cup of water or milk.. Generally you want to reduce the amounts of liquids used to convert a recipe to a crock pot, you really don’t lose water to evaporation with a slow cooker and the extra liquids from the meat and veggies can add up quickly.

Dairy tends to get.. weird over long times in a slow cooker so only use water or beef broth, you can add a splash of milk or cream to the paprika roux as the final step.

Brown the meat in a skillet with some oil over high heat. This step is optional.

Get the meat and veggies in the crock and add 3/4 to 1 cup of water or beef broth. Cook on low at least 8 hours.

When ready to serve melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat and add the flour, whisk or stir it until a light golden color. Now is when you would add a few splashes of milk or cream, add paprika and whisk well.

Add your paprika roux to the crock, turn crock on high, and stir until the gravy thickens to your desired consistency.

If too thick, add a little more water or broth. If too loose whisk another tablespoon of flour and butter in a pan and add to the crock.

The more you make it the better idea of how much liquid you start with and how much roux you need at the end will become a given.

Good luck.