Sleep calculator for kids

Back-to-school season is officially upon us. And while it’s important that moms and dads maintain a healthy sleep schedule (if at all possible), it’s even more dire that kids, no matter what age, get the right amount of rest before hitting the books.

That’s why the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project, in partnership with the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and other organizations like the CDC, created the Bedtime Calculator as part of their “Make Time 2 Sleep” campaign.

Similar to the bedtime calculator we shared with you last year, this tool provides parents with the proper bedtime for their kids based on two factors: their age and when they’re getting up the next day. To see the results, just select the appropriate numbers using the two sliders — it’s that simple.

For instance, the average 5-year-old who gets up for Kindergarten at 7:00 a.m., would need to go the bed before 9:00 p.m.

SleepEducation.org

Your 10-year-old would have to go to bed between 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. if he or she woke up at 6:30 a.m. for school.

SleepEducation.org

And for your 15-year-old teen waking up at 7:00 in the morning, they should be in bed between 9:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. the night before (though with the workload these days, we all know that may not be realistic).

SleepEducation.org

It’s important to note that the wake up times only go by increments of 30 minutes, but regardless, this calculator is seemingly accurate — results represent sleep durations recommended by the AASM. Try it out yourself!

Getting the right amount of sleep is pertinent to your kids’ ability to put his or her best foot forward, especially since the CDC found that only 17.7% of U.S. public middle schools and high schools start school at 8:30 a.m. or later.

“Back-to-school time provides families with a perfect opportunity to re-evaluate their sleeping habits and establish healthy routines to ensure sufficient sleep,” said AASM President Dr. Ilene Rosen in a press release. “No matter the age, children and adults report improved alertness, energy, mood and physical well-being when enjoying healthy, consistent sleep.”

The time is now: Start off the new school year strong and establish a routine you and your kids — big or small — are comfortable with. We promise you’ll be happy you did.

[h/t SleepEducation.org

Samantha Brodsky Editorial Fellow Samantha is an editorial fellow for GoodHousekeeping.com and HouseBeautiful.com.

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This post was sponsored by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All views and text are mine.

School is back and after a summer of late nights and laid-back mornings, now our kids have to adjust to the earlier bedtimes and wake-up calls. Transitioning back into the new school year routine can get challenging for many children and families. But with some advance planning, the switch from summer to Fall doesn’t have to hurt as much.

Here are a few helpful tips to ensure a smoother, easier sleep transition for your child:

Set new sleep habits but do it in small increments. Ease the transition back to early mornings by implementing a bedtime. Ensure that bedtimes and wake-up times for young children are already set about a few weeks before the first day of school. Gradually move this time back in 15-minute increments until you reach the appropriate times for your child’s school schedule. Setting it back slowly will make early school hours easier to handle.

Have a “wind down” time before bedtime. To develop a calm, relaxing bedtime routine and a restful sleep each night, find time for the kids to wind down at least 30 minutes before bed. This means ending all rough and tumble play, dimming the lights, avoiding all sugary sweets and snacks and turning off all electronics.

Be aware of how much sleep your child needs. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, sleep is essential for optimal health in children and adolescents. So it’s important to be aware of how much your child actually needs. It’s a known fact that sleeping the number of recommended hours on a regular basis is associated with better health outcomes including: improved attention, behavior, learning, memory, emotional regulation, quality of life, and mental and physical health.

Fortunately, the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project has made it easier for us to identify the appropriate bedtime for children, teens and adults with their new online Bedtime Calculator. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Sleep Research Society (SRS) have all partnered with this project and developed the calculator as part of the “Make Time 2 Sleep” campaign to help families adopt routines that fit each individual’s unique lifestyle and sleep needs.

The online Bedtime Calculator allows schoolchildren, teens and parents of young children to enter an age and wake time to identify an appropriate bedtime based on the sleep duration recommendations of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine:

  • Infants 4 months to 12 months old: 12 to 16 hours (including naps)
  • Children 1 to 2 years old: 11 to 14 hours (including naps)
  • Children 3 to 5 years old: 10 to 13 hours (including naps)
  • Children 6 to 12 years old: nine to 12 hours per night.
  • Teenagers 13 to 18 years old: eight to 10 hours per night

Children, teens and adults all need sufficient sleep, so it’s great to know that we adults can also use the Bedtime Calculator to help us get the recommended seven or more hours of nightly sleep.

For more information on the importance of healthy sleeping and other related articles, go to www.sleepeducation.org

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Get Bedtime Back On Track Before School Starts

The school summer holidays are a fun and exciting time for children but later nights and sleeping in for hours on end can be disruptive to bedtimes.

In less than a week the holiday period ends and kids head back to the classroom. The switch from fun to a more structured day affects the body clock making it difficult to readjust to waking up for a normal ‘school’ day.

We are advising parents to get their kids bedtime back on track before they return. And don’t wait until a couple of days before your child starts back at school or you may find you have a battle on your hands. Start now and give it at least a week to prepare, ensuring they get back to their usual bed and wake-up times.

We recommend a steady transitional routine – start by backing up the time kids hit the sack by about 15 minutes every three days. If children return at the start of a new term tired, they will likely have poor concentration, lack of energy and increased irritability!

With sleep deprivation known to affect everything from a child’s attention span to their planning and problem-solving skills and behavior, re-establishing a good sleep routine is vital in the back to school countdown.

Sleep deprivation affects every aspect of a child’s life, from friends and family relationships to school performance and their general mood. So, by ensuring they get plenty of good quality and quantity of sleep each night, parents can really help their child fulfil their potential

Sleep is especially important for children as it directly impacts mental and physical development. Young children need around 10-11 hours sleep a night, older children around nine. Lack of sleep can make children irritable and can lead to mood swings, behavioural problems such as hyperactivity and cognitive problems that affects their ability to learn in school.

It’s also important to have a proper wind down routine before bedtime. Try putting away toys and particularly electronic items, an hour before they go to bed. A bath followed by a warm milky drink and reading them a book is a simple and effective wind-down. This gets children relaxed and ready for bed. Make sure that the bed is comfy and welcoming too – and never send kids to bed if they’re being naughty!

Watch our video to find out more…

This ‘Bedtime Calculator’ Tells You Exactly When Your Kids Should Go to Bed

Image Source/Getty Images

Back-to-school season is officially here. Beyond the impossible task of getting your children to do their homework, getting them to go to sleep is an even bigger parenting challenge. However, a nightly dose of vitamin ZZZ is instrumental in developing children’s brains and bodies, as well as ensuring they wake up smarter, happier, healthier, and raring to go the next morning. Yet despite how essential sleep is to your kid’s overall well-being, children (and parents) simply aren’t sleeping enough. According to the National Sleep Foundation, children are getting less sleep than what experts recommend and more than two-thirds of children experience frequent sleep problems.

If you’ve struggled with deciding to put your preschooler to bed before 8:00 p.m., or whether to send your teenager upstairs to his or her room after 9:00 p.m., there is now a tool that can help. The new Bedtime Calculator was developed by the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project, in partnership with the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control. Regardless if your child is five or 18 years old, all you have to do is enter their age and the time they need to wake up. The online calculator does the rest—sans turning off the lights and setting the alarm, of course.

For example, the calculator would tell you that the proper bedtime for a 5-year-old kindergarten student who needs to wake up at 7:00 a.m. is before 9:00 p.m. Although, for the average 11-year-old, who needs to wake up by 6:30 a.m. for school, he or she would need to be in bed between 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. This is determined by the AASM’s recommendation that a child in this age bracket requires 9 to 12 hours of sleep. You can try out the handy slider tool here. We should note, however, that the wake-up times are only in 30-minute increments, predetermined by the AASM’s recommended sleep durations.

Image zoom Sleep Education

“Back-to-school time provides families with a perfect opportunity to re-evaluate their sleeping habits and establish healthy routines to ensure sufficient sleep,” stated AASM President Dr. Ilene Rosen in an August 2017 press release. “No matter the age, children and adults report improved alertness, energy, mood and physical well-being when enjoying healthy, consistent sleep.”

WATCH: These Adorable Wafer Cookie Pencils are Perfect for Back-to-School

Wondering how much sleep your toddler, older child, or teenager needs? Use this calculator to determine when to send them off to dreamland.

Bedtime calculator helps families prioritize healthy sleep

DARIEN, IL – The arrival of another school year means that it’s time for students to reset their bedtimes as the summer break comes to an end. To help identify the appropriate bedtime for children, teens and adults, the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project has created an online Bedtime Calculator. Project partners – including the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Sleep Research Society (SRS) – developed the calculator as part of the “Make Time 2 Sleep” campaign to help families adopt routines that fit each individual’s unique lifestyle and sleep needs.

“Back-to-school time provides families with a perfect opportunity to re-evaluate their sleeping habits and establish healthy routines to ensure sufficient sleep,” said AASM President Dr. Ilene Rosen. “No matter the age, children and adults report improved alertness, energy, mood and physical well-being when enjoying healthy, consistent sleep.”

Personalized Bedtime Calculator
The online Bedtime Calculator allows schoolchildren, teens and parents of young children to enter an age and wake time to identify an appropriate bedtime based on the sleep duration recommendations of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine:

  • Infants 4 months to 12 months new: 12 to 16 hours (including naps)
  • Children 1 to 2 years new: 11 to 14 hours (including naps)
  • Children 3 to 5 years new: 10 to 13 hours (including naps)
  • Children 6 to 12 years new: nine to 12 hours per night.
  • Teenagers 13 to 18 years new: eight to 10 hours per night

Because everyone needs sufficient sleep, adults also can use the Bedtime Calculator to help them get the recommended seven or more hours of nightly sleep.

Later School Start Times
During adolescence a natural shift occurs in the timing of the body’s internal circadian clock, causing most teens to have a biological preference for a late-night bedtime and later wake time. Early school start times can make it difficult for teens to get sufficient sleep, requiring them to adhere to an early bedtime that is unrealistic for their age.

A recent CDC analysis found that early school start times are prevalent, with only 17.7 percent of public middle schools and high schools in the U.S. starting school at 8:30 a.m. or later. CDC data also show that only 27 percent of U.S. high school students report sleeping 8 hours or more on an average school night.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine asserts that the school day should begin at 8:30 a.m. or later for middle school and high school students. Later start times provide adolescents a better opportunity to get sufficient sleep on school nights, which helps to optimize their daytime alertness, reduce tardiness and improve school attendance. A later school start time supports peak academic performance, more opportunities for learning, better mental health and reduced risk of injury.

Later school start times also can reduce the risk of motor vehicle accidents, which account for 35 percent of all deaths and 73 percent of deaths from unintentional injury in teenagers. One study found that crash rates declined by 16.5 percent following a school start time delay of 60 minutes.

To help raise awareness and improve teen safety, the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project has created a template letter for parents and community members to download from the “Make Time 2 Sleep” webpage. Parents are encouraged to send the letter to their local school boards and policy makers. The template letter, along with other information about healthy sleep, is available at www.projecthealthysleep.org.

CONTACT: Mary Velan, L.C. Williams & Associates, 312-565-4631, [email protected]

About the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project
The National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project was initiated in 2013 and is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through a cooperative agreement with the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The project involves collaboration with the Sleep Research Society and other partners to address the sleep health focus area of Healthy People 2020, which provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. The sleep health objectives are to increase the medical evaluation of people with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea, reduce vehicular crashes due to drowsy driving and ensure more Americans get sufficient sleep. For more information, visit www.projecthealthysleep.org.

The amount of sleep a child needs varies depending on the individual and certain factors, including the age of the child. Following are some general guidelines:

1-4 Weeks Old: 15 – 16 hours per day

Newborns typically sleep about 15 to 18 hours a day, but only in short periods of two to four hours. Premature babies may sleep longer and colicky ones shorter.

Since newborns do not yet have an internal biological clock, or circadian rhythm, their sleep patterns are not related to the daylight and nighttime cycles. In fact, they tend not to have much of a pattern at all.

1-4 Months Old: 14 – 15 hours per day

By 6 weeks of age your baby is beginning to settle down a bit, and you may notice more regular sleep patterns emerging. The longest periods of sleep run four to six hours and now tends to occur more regularly in the evening. Day-night confusion ends.

4-12 Months Old: 14 – 15 hours per day

While up to 15 hours is ideal, most infants up to 11 months old get only about 12 hours of sleep. Establishing healthy sleep habits is a primary goal during this period, as your baby is now much more social, and his sleep patterns are more adult-like.

Babies typically have three naps and drop to two at around 6 months old, at which time (or earlier) they are physically capable of sleeping through the night. Establishing regular naps generally happens at the latter part of this time frame, as the biological rhythms mature. The midmorning nap usually starts at 9 a.m. and lasts about an hour. The early afternoon nap starts between noon and 2 p.m. and lasts an hour or two. And the late afternoon nap may start anywhere from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. and usually varies in length.

1-3 Years Old: 12 – 14 hours per day

As your child moves past the first year toward 18-21 months of age he will likely lose his morning and early evening nap and nap only once a day. While toddlers need up to 14 hours a day of sleep, they typically get only about 10.