Roasted broad beans recipe


I love fava beans and buy them buy the bag full at our local market when they are fresh each spring. Unfortunately though, the season is now over for fresh fava beans but I have found some frozen ones at our local grocery stores that are just about as good as the fresh ones. The frozen ones I buy are very small, so I do not even have to peel them, but if you are using larger fava beans, either fresh or frozen, I’d advise peeling them before assembling this recipe. To peel, simply drop the podded beans in boiling water for a couple of minutes, drain and then run cold water over them. Use a sharp small knife to cut a slit into the skin and simply squeeze gently to pop the bean out of it’s skin.

Buon Appetito!
Deborah Mele 2011

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1/4 Pound Finely Diced Pancetta (I Prefer Unsmoked In This Recipe)
  • 1 Small Onion, Peeled And Finely Chopped
  • 1/2 Cup Dry White Wine
  • 1 1/2 Pounds Fresh or Frozen Podded Fava Beans (About 4 cups)
  • 1 Clove Garlic, Minced
  • Salt & Pepper

Instructions

  1. In a medium skillet, heat the olive oil and cook the pancetta and onion over medium heat until the pancetta is lightly browned and the onions soft, about 10 minutes.
  2. Add the garlic and cook another minute or two until fragrant.
  3. Add the wine, fava beans, and pepper.
  4. Simmer uncovered for about 5 minutes or until all the liquid is absorbed.
  5. Season with salt to taste and serve.
Nutrition Information:

Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1 cup
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 222 Total Fat: 13g Saturated Fat: 4g Trans Fat: 0g Unsaturated Fat: 8g Cholesterol: 14mg Sodium: 239mg Carbohydrates: 17g Fiber: 4g Sugar: 2g Protein: 8g

Italian vegetable stew with broad beans, peas & artichokes

  • For this stage of the recipe, you don’t need the stirrer attachment. Pour 2.5 litres of water into the HomeCooker pan and set the temperature to 250°C. Once the water is boiling, sit the pasta insert in the pan, add the broad beans and set the timer for 1 minute. When the time’s up, carefully lift out the pasta insert to drain the beans, then add them to a bowl of cold water. Pop the beans out of their skins, drain them and put aside.
  • Empty and wipe out the HomeCooker pan, make sure the stirrer attachment is in place, then set the temperature to 130°C. Once the pan has heated up, add 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, the onion and leek. Put the lid on and set the timer for 15 minutes, so the veg are soft but not coloured. Meanwhile, snap the woody ends off the asparagus then finely slice the stalks, leaving the tips whole.
  • Pour the stock into the pan and bring it to the boil, then add the prosciutto and set the timer for 5 minutes. Add the spinach and asparagus to the pan, put the lid on and set the timer for 5 minutes. Add the broad beans, peas and artichokes and set the timer for a final 3 minutes. Meanwhile, roughly chop the mint leaves.
  • When the time’s up, everything should be nicely stewed so turn the HomeCooker off, remove the pan and the stirrer attachment. Season the veg to taste and stir through most of the chopped mint. Spoon into a nice serving dish, scatter over the remaining mint and the lemon zest, then drizzle witha little extra virgin olive oil and serve.
  • Chef’s tip: If you can get hold of fresh artichokes, they’ll be absolutely delicious here. Just prep them, then blanch in boiling salted water in the HomeCooker for 7 minutes until tender before you start, adding them with the broad beans and peas towards the end of the recipe

Credits: Viktorija Todorovska – The Sardinian Cookbook

Easy Italian Recipes

Shake off any flashbacks of the mooshy lima beans your mom made you eat as a kid — fresh fava beans, with their nutty flavor and creamy texture, are something completely different! The Italians love them and so should you. Also called broad beans, they are the oldest known beans in the world and are extremely nutritious.

Fava beans grow in a pod like peas, although they are much bigger, and the pod is soft and fuzzy. In some countries it is customary to peel the transparent skin off the bean, but in Italy fava beans are often just shucked from the pod and cooked. Even the cooking is optional: in Rome, on the May 1st holiday celebrating Labor Day, Roman families traditionally eat fresh fava beans with Pecorino Romano cheese during a picnic in the countryside.

A popular Italian saying is prendere due piccioni con una fava — in English, we say to “kill two birds with one stone” – and that’s just what you can do with the ingredients used in this simple spring dish: eat them raw for one meal and then make Malloreddus with Fresh Fava Beans and Pecorino for another. The recipe is compliments of “The Sardinian Cookbook: The Cooking and Culture of a Mediterranean Island” and the type of pasta called for comes from Sardinia, too (if you can’t find malloreddus, any good quality short pasta will do). Use young pecorino in the dish, as it melts well, and pair it with a fresh white wine such as Vermentino di Sardegna.

Download the free eBook Food & Wine: A Guide to Italian Cuisine & learn the best recipes & Italian dishes.

Recipe for Malloreddus with Fresh Fava Beans and Pecorino

Ingredients for 4 servings

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups fresh fava beans, shelled
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt, plus more to taste
  • 1 gallon water
  • 3 cups Malloreddus or other short pasta such as shells or bowties
  • 3/4 cup freshly-grated pecorino cheese, for sprinkling

In a large 6- to 7-quart sauté pan, warm the oil and add the fava beans. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes, until the beans start to soften. Add a pinch of salt and remove from the heat. Set aside.

In a medium 8- to 12-quart stockpot, bring the water and 1 tablespoon Kosher salt to a boil. Add the Malloreddus and cook, following the package instructions, until the pasta is almost al dente. Remove from the heat.

Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the cooking water.

Toss the pasta with the fava beans and stir well, adding 1/2 cup of the reserved cooking water to create a sauce. Cook for 1 minute or so, until the flavors blend.

Transfer the Malloreddus and fava to a serving bowl. Serve hot, sprinkled with the pecorino.

What is your favorite Italian recipe? Share your Italian recipes with us!

Broad bean

A member of the legume family, broad beans are pretty hardy and adaptable – they grow in most soils and climates. They’re a great source of protein and carbohydrates, as well as vitamins A, B1 and B2. In the US, they’re known as fava beans.

Availability

At their peak from the end of June to mid-September. Broad beans are easy to grow in a veg patch or allotment.

Choose the best

Buy broad beans as fresh as possible – pods should be firm and crisp. Avoid any that feel soft with pockets of air inside.

Prepare it

Broad beans should be podded from their velvety jackets before using. Slit each pod along its seam and run your thumb along the furry inside to push the beans out.

To double pod – or remove the thin skin that covers each individual bean – blanch the beans for 2 mins, drain and cool under cold water before using your nail to slit the leathery skin, then pop out the bright green bean. If the broad beans are particularly large, this outer skin can be quite leathery. Although double podding can be labour-intenstive, it’s a theraputic task that reveals creamy, vibrant, sweet beans that sing of the flavours of spring.

You can also buy podded broad beans frozen. These don’t need to be blanched if you’re double podding – simply defrost, then remove their little jackets.

Store it

Keep in a perforated bag in the fridge for up to five days. Blanched beans can be frozen and stored for up to three months if you have a glut.

Cook it

Double pod and puree with feta or hummus in a dip for crudités. Pod and dress in a chilli & mint vinaigrette with burrata or mozzerella, or stir through risottos, soups and salads.

Find more information on how to cook broad beans here.

Alternatives

Try runner bean, French bean or flat bean.

Many people don’t know how to prepare broad beans. Double podding, or double shelling, broad beans is the process by which you remove the tough outer skins, exposing the beautifully tender bright green beans.

If you think you don’t like broad beans you’ve probably only had the slightly chewy, greyish un-podded beans and you should definitely give this a try. In fact I would go so far as to say that they’re not really worth eating unless you double pod them.

Back in 2011 (I remember the year clearly because I not only had a 16-month old toddler I was also five months pregnant with my second baby) I helped cater for a friend’s wedding. I don’t remember what the exact dish was now but I do remember double podding hundreds of broad beans. It took me AGES.

Blanching the broad beans speeds up the podding process

And then a couple of years later I learnt that if you blanch the broad beans it is about a gazillion times easier to double pod them. If only I’d known that in August 2011…

Since then I’ve always followed this method when I cook broad beans. The other day I thought I’d write the method up in a blog post in case there is anyone who like me knows to double pod their broad beans but doesn’t know that they need to blanch them first.

I know a lot more about cooking vegetables these days than I used to!

What are broad beans?

Broad beans are also known as fava beans. The outer seed pod can only be eaten in very young beans. Otherwise it’s the seeds within the pods that you want to eat.

Broad beans are popular in Middle Eastern, Chinese, South American and African cuisine. Dishes made with broad beans include:

  • falafel
  • ful medames
  • Mexican bean soup.

See more dishes made with broad beans.

Here’s how to prepare broad beans

  1. Remove the beans from their outer pods.

2. You’ll be left with beans that look like this.

3. Place in a pan of boiling water and boil for 2 minutes.

4. Drain and immediately place in very cold, or iced, water to stop the cooking process.

5. Gently squeeze each bean until the inner section pops out.

6. Discard the outer skins.

If you find it boring then it’s ok to eat a few along the way to motivate you!

What to do with your cooked broad beans

You can add your broad beans to a salad or eat them cold as they are.

Alternatively you can gently reheat them in a pan or by stirring into a risotto or pasta dish.

Or try making something with them like these broad bean, feta and dill bites.

Pin how to prepare broad beans for later

How to cook broad beans

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How to prepare broad beans

Double podding, or double shelling, broad beans is the process by which you remove the tough outer skins, exposing the beautifully tender bright green beans.

Course Side Dish Cuisine British Keyword broad beans Prep Time 15 minutes Cook Time 2 minutes Servings 2

  • 500 g broad beans
  1. Remove the beans from their outer pods (see pictures above)

  2. Place the beans in a pan of boiling water and boil for 2 minutes.

  3. Drain and immediately place in very cold, or iced, water to stop the cooking process.

  4. Gently squeeze each bean until the inner section pops out. Discard the outer skins.

  5. Add to a salad, reheat, or stir into a risotto or pasta dish.

If you like this you might also like this recipe for green beans with tomatoes and black olives.

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Broad beans. Renia123 / .com / 2009 / CC0 1.0

Broad beans vary in shape and colour, the most commonly-sold ones being brown. They grow in large pods that hold around five beans per pod.

The beans are similar in shape and texture to Lima beans, without being as starchy.

Some people consider these the meatiest-tasting beans.

Choosing broad beans

You can generally buy them fresh and still in the pod, or podded and dried. Young beans can be cooked in their pod and eaten pod and all, or you can pod them, and serve them uncooked in salads or antipasti.

As the beans get older later in the season, the beans must be “shelled” out of the pod, plus have the skin removed on each bean.

Broad beans inside a pod. Rasbak / wikimedia / 2011 / CC BY-SA 3.0

Cooking Tips

Broad beans do not mash easily; when mashing, use either a food processor or a mortar and pestle.

When you are cooking broad beans with other items (stews or casseroles, for instance), allow a longer cooking time than you would for other beans. Never salt the water when boiling as it will toughen the skin.

Simmer on stove for two to three hours.

Pressure cooking broad beans

  • Fresh broad beans, unsoaked, 6 minutes, high pressure, natural release
  • Dried broad beans, soaked, 1o minutes, high pressure, natural release
  • Dried broad beans, unsoaked, 25 minutes, high pressure, natural release

(Times from: Pazzaglia, Laura. Hip Pressure Cooking. New York: St Martin’s Griffin. 2014. Page 270.)

Broad beans with black lines

Older beans, indicated by a black line on them, are better when the toughened skin on each bean has been removed. First, remove the beans from the pods, then blanch the beans in boiling water for 1 minute. After this, the tough skin around the individual beans will slip off more easily by pinching the beans.

Older broad beans showing black line. Thor / flickr / 2010 / CC BY 2.0

Nutrition

Fresh broad beans contain riboflavin and Vitamin C.

Some people of Mediterranean descent are allergic to mature broad beans, so it would be wise to try just a few initially. ”Favism, an inborn error of metabolism, affects up to 35% of some Mediterranean populations and about 10% of American negroes. In sensitive people, ingesting (or even inhaling the pollen) of broad beans, or fava beans (Vicia faba), causes the breakdown of red blood cells (an acute hemolytic anemia.) The symptoms are dizziness, nausea and vomiting, and sometimes a high fever and collapse, followed by severe anemia. There is no known way of processing broad beans to remove or inactivate the substances that cause favism; hence, people who are susceptible to this type of hemolytic anemia should avoid broad beans.” — Ensiminger, Marion Eugene et al. Foods & Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. Vol 1. 1993. Page 275.

Apparently people with Parkinson’s Disease will want to consult a physician before adding broad beans to their diets.

Nutrition Facts

Per 1 cup (170g), boiled

Amount
Calories 185
Fat .7 g
Protein 13 g
Folate 175 mcg
Thiamine .165 mg

Broad beans in pods. Jeremy Keith / flickr / 2005 / CC BY 2.0

Equivalents

Storage Hints

To freeze, shell older broad beans or cut young bean pods into 2 to 3 cm (1 inch) pieces. Blanch for 2 minutes, plunge into cold water to cool quickly, pack and freeze for up to 12 months. To use, cook from frozen in boiling water for 5 to 8 minutes.

History Notes

The ancient Egyptians used broad beans, as did the Greeks and Romans. There is a surviving recipe for a purée of broad beans with cumin, coriander, olive oil and liquamen (the fish sauce that Romans were passionate about). The Italians still make a broad bean purée called “favetta”.

One account of the death of the Ancient Greek philosopher, Pythagoras, has him being caught by a mob at the edge of a broad bean field, which he was too terrified to enter to escape through. Some have theorized that he may have been allergic to the beans (some people are allergic even to the pollen of the plant Ibid.), and thus have developed a pathological fear of the beans. This may have been, they hypostulate, why he taught his followers to avoid all beans in general.

Broad beans. Anna Kropek / .com / 2016 / CC0 1.0

Literature & Lore

The ancient Greeks considered broad beans unlucky. The letter from the alphabet, theta, which looks like this θ, was the first letter of their word for death, “thanatos”. Greek juries would just mark θ on their ballots when they were voting to condemn a prisoner to death. Broad beans got associated with this, and thus the association with being unlucky, because the Greeks thought that the markings on the plants leaves resembled θ. No doubt the fact that some Mediterranean people are allergic to broad beans helped this death association along.

In Lac-Saint-Jean, Quebec, “soupe aux gourganes” (broad bean soup) is a local specialty.

Mature broad beans. 12019 / .com / 2012 / CC0 1.0

References

1. ”Favism, an inborn error of metabolism, affects up to 35% of some Mediterranean populations and about 10% of American negroes. In sensitive people, ingesting (or even inhaling the pollen) of broad beans, or fava beans (Vicia faba), causes the breakdown of red blood cells (an acute hemolytic anemia.) The symptoms are dizziness, nausea and vomiting, and sometimes a high fever and collapse, followed by severe anemia. There is no known way of processing broad beans to remove or inactivate the substances that cause favism; hence, people who are susceptible to this type of hemolytic anemia should avoid broad beans.” — Ensiminger, Marion Eugene et al. Foods & Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. Vol 1. 1993. Page 275.
2. Ibid.
  • 300 gram dried broad beans *Note
  • 2 shallots
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • olive oil
  • pepper and salt to taste
  • handful of cress

*Note: soak the dried broad beans overnight in cold water

Pan fried broad beans with garlic ingredients

Kitchen equipment needed

  • medium-sized bowl
  • medium-sized pan
  • colander
  • large skillet
  • cutting board & chef’s knife

Preparation — 1 hour + waiting time

Make sure the beans are soaked overnight and FILL a medium-sized pan with water and bring to a boil. COOK the soaked broad beans for about an hour, it’s possible that it takes a bit longer. Sometimes the skin of the beans are a bit harder, this can vary, you need to cook them a bit longer than usual. DRAIN the broad beans and set them aside.

PEEL and finely chop the shallots and garlic cloves.

Pan fried broad beans with garlic

Finishing the pan fried broad beans with garlic — 10 minutes

HEAT a bit of olive oil in a large skillet and sauté the beans for about 5 minutes. ADD the shallots and garlic and sauté a few minutes more. SEASON with pepper and salt.

STIR in a handful of cress and serve as a side dish. Enjoy!

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