How to fold flag?

How to Fold an American Flag

Follow These Steps

  1. Start by holding the flag parallel to the ground, at waist-level, making sure to keep it nice and taut.
  2. Fold it in half, length-wise, so that the Union (that’s the part with the stars) faces the ground.
  3. Now fold it in half again. The stars should now face out from both sides of the flag.
    Tip: As you’re folding, make sure the crease is perfectly aligned. You can also smooth it out with your hand to get rid of any air bubbles.
  4. Now you’re ready to start folding the triangles. While your partner holds the flag taut, take the left-hand corner on the end opposite from the stars and fold it up on top of the flag so that the edge is parallel to the right-hand side. The stripes should now run perpendicular to each other, forming a triangle.
  5. Now take the outermost point of the triangle’s edge, and fold it over the flag. Continue to do this until the stripes meet the stars. Try to make the folds as tight as possible.
  6. Tuck the remaining flap into the slot formed between the stars and stripes.
  7. You now have a perfectly folded flag that will fit neatly in any drawer.

How to Fold the Flag

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SINGAPORE – Masks are not something that you can wear and automatically get protection against the Wuhan virus.

This was a reminder by Minister for National Development Lawrence Wong at a news conference on Thursday (Jan 30), in the wake of signs of panic buying of surgical masks in Singapore.

More than five million masks released to retailers were “snapped up in hours” each time a batch of these were put up for sale over the past nine days, said Mr Wong, who is co-chair of the multi-ministry task force tackling the spread of the Wuhan virus here.

“Medical experts have highlighted that sometimes wearing a mask or wearing it wrongly can give you a false sense of security. You wear it wrongly, it may not be effective,” he said.

“Worse, if you wear it and you still use your hands to touch your face constantly, it doesn’t help at all because there is more likelihood that the virus can spread through contact and through your hands.”

So, who should wear a mask and what is the proper way to wear it, should you need one?

WHO NEEDS TO WEAR A MASK

• Masks are meant to be worn only by people who are unwell. They are designed to prevent the passing of a virus from the wearer to other people, not the other way around.

• They are not meant for healthy people doing their day-to-day chores.

• Masks do not confer automatic protection against the virus.

• Wearing a mask wrongly can render it ineffective or give users a false sense of security.

• Viruses are often passed through contact, such as by touching a contaminated lift button or door handle, and then touching your face.

HOW TO WEAR A MASK PROPERLY

• Wash your hands with soap and water before touching the mask.

• Remove the mask from the box and make sure there are no obvious tears or holes.

• The metal band should be at the top.

• Place the loops behind your ears, or tie one set of bands behind your head and the other pair behind your neck.

• Pull the bottom of the mask under your chin towards your neck.

• With your fingers, press the metal band so that it conforms to the bridge of your nose.

• Make sure there are no gaps between the mask and your face.

• Discard masks if wet or soiled. Do not wear one for more than 24 hours.

• Wash your hands after removing the mask.

How to Fold an American Flag: Step By Step US Flag Folding Instructions

The flag of the United States is made to specific proportions, therefore we can always fold it the same unique way and it will come out the same, no matter what size it is.

Steps for Properly Folding the American Flag

Step 1.) Begin by holding the flag waist-high with another person so that its surface is parallel to the ground:

Step 2.) Fold the flag in half twice, width-wise:

1st Fold:

2nd Fold:

Step 3.) Beginning at the striped end, fold one corner into the opposite side of the flag, forming a triangle :

Step 4.) Repeat this triangular folding until only a small strip of the star field shows :

Step 5.) Tuck this strip into the triangle:

Once you’ve reached this final triangular shape, your American flag is folded correctly!

You can find another helpful diagram describing how to properly fold an American flag here.

Other US Flag Folding Tips

  • Flag etiquette states that the flag should never touch the ground or floor. This applies even when it is being folded. Keep the flag from touching the ground while folding!
  • When making the two width-wise folds, be sure to keep the stars on the outside. If you do this, you will have a triangular field of stars when you are finished folding the flag.

Need Help Folding Your Flag Properly?

We know that for some people, honoring the flag and the loved ones it represents by folding it properly can feel like a daunting task. It’s not something you want to do incorrectly!

If you’d like your American flag folded professionally, we can help you with that! Our team of flag experts would be happy to assist you in ensuring that your flag is properly folded in accordance with US Flag Code. You can learn more about our flag folding services here.

What To Do With Your American Flag Once It Is Folded

Once properly folded, there are a variety of things you can do with your American flag!

  • Put your flag on display in a beautiful memorial flag case so it can be enjoyed in its folded form.
  • Looking to store your American flag after folding it? We recommend using a plastic storage cover to store your American flag safely and protect it while it’s put away.

Looking for More Insight About Properly Caring For and Displaying Your American Flag?

We’ve got you covered! Our flag experts have put together a number of flag etiquette resources that cover everything from displaying your flag correctly to properly retiring or disposing of your flag.

  • Half Staff Dates & Rules: When to Fly the Flag Half Mast
  • American Flag Outdoor Display Rules
  • American Flag Indoor Display Rules
  • American Flag Retirement Protocol
  • How to Choose The Right Flag for Your Flagpole

In Need of a New American Flag?

We carry a wide variety of American flags made in the USA, including indoor flags, outdoor flags, stick flags and more. Browse our entire selection of American flags here.

Have questions about flag folding, flag etiquette, or any of our flag products? Don’t hesitate to give us a call at 1-888-697-3524 or contact us online and we’d be happy to assist you!


Have 2 people hold the flag horizontal to the ground.

Fold the flag lengthwise. Pull tight and keep taught.

Then fold the flag lengthwise one more time.


Bring the lower striped corner to the upper edge, forming a triangle at a 90 degree angle.

Then fold the upper point 90 degree triangles while assuring the folds are smooth. Then fold the upper point in to form another triangle.

Repeat this procedure until the flag has reached end of the stars.

A finished flag, properly folded, is smooth, taught and squarely stowed. When you get near the end—nothing but the blue field showing—tuck the last bit into the other folds to secure it.

Flag Folding Ceremony

The ceremony of folding of an American flag may be narrated at special occasions. The following narration is from the United States Air Force Academy and is read aloud as each fold takes place:

  • “The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.”
  • “The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life.”
  • “The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country to attain a peace throughout the world.”
  • “The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in times of war for His divine guidance.”
  • “The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.”
  • “The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”
  • “The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.”
  • “The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered in to the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on Mother’s Day.”
  • “The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded.”
  • “The tenth fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born.”
  • “The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.”
  • “The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.”
  • “When the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, “In God we Trust.”

If you are looking to purchase a new flag be sure to check out our American Flags for sale. We carry only flags made to the flag manufacturers of America guidelines to ensure that from top to bottom our flags are 100% made in the USA.

The American flag is one of the most important symbols of the United States. For many, it symbolizes respect, honor, and freedom. For others, the flag represents reflection, courage and sorrow. The National Air and Space Museum cares for a number of American flags in the Smithsonian Institution’s national collection, many of which represent significant events in the history of space exploration or aeronautics. One belonged to Amelia Earhart. One was flown aboard Gemini 4 by NASA astronauts James McDivitt and Edward H. White in 1965. And the Museum has several replicas of the flag that was left on the Moon during the Apollo 11 lunar landing in 1969. Although each flag has a story that is worth telling, the care and preservation of these unique objects is also noteworthy.

Even though Museum staff are trained to handle cultural objects, sometimes an object requires special attention. With the upcoming installation of new displays in the Moving Beyond Earth gallery highlighting the history of the space shuttle program, a very special flag was chosen for display. This particular flag was flown over the U.S. Capitol on February 1, 2003 as a tribute to the crew of STS-107, who died when the space shuttle Columbia was lost during re-entry at the end of its mission. It was donated to the Museum by Dennis Hastert, then Speaker of the House of Representatives, to honor the astronauts.

This American flag was flown over the U.S. Capitol on February 1, 2003 as a tribute to the crew of STS-107, who died that day when the Space Shuttle Columbia was lost during re-entry at the end of their mission. It was donated to the Museum by Dennis Hastert, then Speaker of the House of Representatives, to honor the astronauts.

When it was decided to display the flag in the new gallery, the conservation staff unfolded the flag from its original box so that it could be examined, photographed, and cleaned. The curatorial team agreed that the flag should be folded in the traditional, triangular pattern before putting it on display. Because the flag represents an American tragedy of significant proportion and out of respect for the proper treatment of the artifact, the Museum invited a member of the military to assist with folding the flag. Army Major Warren R. Stump, who recently returned from Afghanistan, assisted the conservation staff.

This American flag was flown over the U.S. Capitol on February 1, 2003 as a tribute to the crew of STS-107, who died that day when the Space Shuttle Columbia was lost during re-entry at the end of their mission. Here the Flag is folded by Major Warren R. Stump. Moving Beyond Earth gallery contractor Stephanie Spence is assisting

Major Stump, with assistance from Stephanie Spence and Dawn Planas (conservation contractors for the Moving Beyond Earth gallery) folded the flag, while I (Lisa Young) read an explanation of the meaning behind each of the thirteen folds in a properly-folded American flag. The flag is folded to represent the original thirteen colonies of the United States. Each fold also carries its own meaning. According to the description, some folds symbolize freedom, life, or pay tribute to mothers, fathers, and those who serve in the Armed Forces. When the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, representing the soldiers who served under George Washington, the sailors and marines who served under John Paul Jones, and the many who have followed in their footsteps.

Major Warren R. Stump folding an American flag to be displayed in the Moving Beyond Earth gallery at the National Air and Space Museum.This flag was flown over the U.S. Capitol on February 1, 2003, as a tribute to the crew of STS-10, who died that day when the Space Shuttle Columbia was lost during re-entry at the end of their mission.

Now folded into the traditional triangle shape, the STS-107 Capitol-flown flag will be displayed in the Moving Beyond Earth gallery. The flag will serve as a reminder of the heroes who flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, and who paved the way for further space exploration. It will also serve as a reminder to Museum staff about how special objects take on new meaning as they are interpreted for public display. We are grateful to Major Stump for helping the Museum to pay full respect to this significant artifact.

This American flag (flown over the U.S. Capitol on February 1, 2003 as a tribute to the crew of STS-107) is presented to the Moving Beyond Earth Curator, Margaret Weitekamp and the conservation team. From left to right, John Holman, Lisa Young, Margaret Weitekamp, Major Warren Stump, Dawn Planas and Stephanie Spence.

How to Respectfully Fold the American Flag

Don’t forget to hang the real Old Glory. The star-spangled American flag is most commonly flown on holidays such as Flag Day, Independence Day, and Veteran’s Day, but it can be flown from sunrise to sunset on any day of the year. When not on display, it should be respectfully folded into a triangular shape. This triangle is emblematic of the three-cornered hats worn by Colonial soldiers in the Revolutionary War. The flag is folded in such a way to represent the original thirteen colonies of the United States, and each individual fold also carries its own meaning. Here’s how to do so, as dictated by the American Legion.

RELATED: THE 12 RULES OF AMERICAN FLAG ETIQUETTE

Image zoom Amanda DiGiondomenico

Fold 1

It takes two people to fold the flag properly, as it should never touch the ground. Both people should hold out the flag waist high, right side up, with its surface parallel to the ground, keeping the tension in the fabric at all times. Fold the flag in half lengthwise, bringing the striped lower section over the canton (which is the blue field of stars) and holding the edges together. The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

Fold 2

Fold it again lengthwise, bringing the canton to the outside. The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

Fold 3

Start a triangular fold by bringing the striped corner of the folded edge up to meet the open edge. The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks, and who gave a portion of his or her life for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

Fold 4

The outer point is then turned inward to form a second triangle. The fourth fold represents our weaker nature; as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace, as well as in times of war, for His divine guidance.

Image zoom Amanda DiGiondomenico

Folds 5-12

Continue folding the flag in this manner eight more times. The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right, but it is still our country, right or wrong.” The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. The seventh fold is a tribute to our armed forces, for it is through the armed forces that we protect our country and our flag against all enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor our mother, for whom it flies on Mother’s Day. The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood, for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded. The tenth fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since he or she was first born. The eleventh fold, in the eyes of Hebrew citizens, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.

Fold 13

These triangular folds bring the red and white stripes into the canton, symbolizing the day’s light vanishing into the darkness of the night. The last fold, when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, “In God We Trust.”

How to Properly Fold a Flag

Displaying the U.S. flag is an excellent way to express patriotism and show support both indoors and outdoors. However, there are certain occasions when you’ll need to take down your flag and store it for safe keeping. In this guide, our team here at Glendale Parade Store will teach you how to properly fold your U.S. flag for safe and secure storage. Read on to learn more, and shop official covers, rifles, flags right here in our online store!

About the U.S. Flag

The U.S. flag can be flown from sunrise to sunset during any day of the year, weather permitting. It can also be displayed at night with proper illumination. When not in use, the U.S. flag should be properly folded into a three-corner configuration. This configuration is emblematic of the three-corner hats worn by colonial soldiers during the Revolutionary War. Learn how to fold your U.S. flag properly in the following section.

Folding the U.S. Flag

Folding the U.S. flag is a relatively simple process that should be performed each time the flag is taken down and stored. It takes at least two people to fold the U.S. flag, depending on the size of the flag in use. During folding, the flag should be held at waist level with its surface parallel to the ground. Because the U.S. flag is not allowed to touch the ground at any time, it should always be held securely.

Begin the folding process by folding the flag in half lengthwise, bringing the striped side over the canton, the blue field of stars. Fold the flag lengthwise again, this time bringing the canton to the outside.

Once you have folded the flag lengthwise twice, make a triangular fold at the striped end, bringing the folded edge over to meet the open edge. Fold the outer point up, parallel to the open edge, to form a second triangle. Continue folding the flag in this manner until you have reached the final triangular fold. This final fold will have successfully folded the red and white stripes into the blue field. Some say this is symbolic of the day’s light vanishing into the darkness of night.

As a final step, tuck the remaining flag flap into the pocket formed between the stars and stripes. Store your flag in a cool, dry area and take care while unfolding. Remember, at no point should your U.S. flag touch the ground, so always hold it securely while folding and unfolding.

Need Further U.S. Flag Assistance? Contact Us!

Need assistance with your U.S. flag? Our professionals here at Glendale Parade Store can help with everything from folding and flag replacement, to accessories, storage solutions and much more. To get in touch with a member of our team, contact us here. For more helpful guides on flag folding and other ceremonial protocol, visit our online library of helpful information.

Our country’s flag is more than just a piece of cloth. It’s a symbol of America. It represents our past, our present and our future, which means the flag of the United States must be honored and treated with respect.

You can fly the flag every day of the year, but you have to do it the right way. Fly your flag from sunrise to sunset. If you want to keep it raised at night, make sure it’s lit properly so it isn’t flying in total darkness.

If the U.S. flag is flown with other types of flags — like state flags or maybe your Scout unit’s flag — the U.S. flag should be given the position of honor to its own right. That means if you’re standing next to the flag and looking out at an audience or away from a building, the U.S. flag should always be on the right.

When hoisting a flag on a flagpole, hold the folded flag so it does not touch the ground. This is a two-man job: One person attaches the flag to the line and raises it while the other holds it steady throughout. When the flag is flying freely, one person should step back and salute it while the other ties the line to the flagpole.

To lower the flag, repeat the process in reverse order. While one person salutes, another should loosed the line and lower the flag slowly. When the flag is in reach, the person who was saluting should gather the flag in his arms while the other removes the flag from the flagpole and re-ties the line.

But you’re not done yet. You can’t just fold up the flag any old way. Hold it at waist level between yourself and another person, fold it in half lengthwise, then fold it in half lengthwise again, always keeping the blue field on the outside. While one person holds the flag by the blue field, the other should make triangular folds from the opposite end until only the blue field is available.

The U.S. flag can be carried on a staff in parades, at Scout meetings and during other ceremonies and events.

Flag Folding

As an Army and Navy custom, the flag is lowered daily at the last note of retreat. Special care should be taken that no part of the flag touches the ground. The Flag is then carefully folded into the shape of a tri-cornered hat, emblematic of the hats worn by colonial soldiers during the war for Independence. In the folding, the red and white stripes are finally wrapped into the blue, as the light of day vanishes into the darkness of night.

This custom of special folding is reserved for the United States Flag alone.

How to fold the Flag

Step 1

To properly fold the Flag, begin by holding it waist-high with another person so that its surface is parallel to the ground.

Step 2

Fold the lower half of the stripe section lengthwise over the field of stars, holding the bottom and top edges securely.

Step 3

Fold the flag again lengthwise with the blue field on the outside.

Step 4

Make a triangular fold by bringing the striped corner of the folded edge to meet the open (top) edge of the flag.

Step 5

Turn the outer (end) point inward, parallel to the open edge, to form a second triangle.

Step 6

The triangular folding is continued until the entire length of the flag is folded in this manner.

Step 7

When the flag is completely folded, only a triangular blue field of stars should be visible.

Flag Folding Ceremony

The flag folding ceremony described by the Uniformed Services is a dramatic and uplifting way to honor the flag on special days, like Memorial Day or Veterans Day, and is sometimes used at retirement ceremonies.

Here is a typical sequence of the reading:

(Begin reading as Honor Guard or Flag Detail is coming forward). The flag folding ceremony represents the same religious principles on which our country was originally founded. The portion of the flag denoting honor is the canton of blue containing the stars representing the states our veterans served in uniform. The canton field of blue dresses from left to right and is inverted when draped as a pall on a casket of a veteran who has served our country in uniform. In the Armed Forces of the United States, at the ceremony of retreat the flag is lowered, folded in a triangle fold and kept under watch throughout the night as a tribute to our nation’s honored dead. The next morning it is brought out and, at the ceremony of reveille, run aloft as a symbol of our belief in the resurrection of the body. (Wait for the Honor Guard or Flag Detail to unravel and fold the flag into a quarter fold–resume reading when Honor Guard is standing ready.) The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life. The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life. The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country to attain a peace throughout the world. The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in times of war for His divine guidance. The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.” The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic. The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered in to the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on mother’s day. The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded. The tenth fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born. The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost. When the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, “In God we Trust.” (Wait for the Honor Guard or Flag Detail to inspect the flag–after the inspection, resume reading.) After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington and the sailors and marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges, and freedoms we enjoy today.

| The Flag Folding Ceremony above is from the US Air Force Academy |

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Do You Know How to Properly Fold an American Flag and What it Symbolizes?

The American Flag is a symbol of democracy that many men and women have sacrificed their very lives defending.

While on first appearance to some, the American flag seems like nothing more than a piece of colored cloth. However, it’s what it represents that warrants our respect. One of the ways we can show respect is to take a few minutes and learn how to properly fold the flag. It’s a relatively easy process, but one that should be practiced.

Folding the National Ensign

An American flag is also know as our National Ensign when used at sea as our country’s maritime flag.

These steps below will require a minimum of two people to keep the flag taut while folding. The person holding the canton (or union) side of the flag will remain stationary, while the person holding the opposite side will move towards them while triangle folding.

The first step in folding the American flag is to fold the lower striped section over the blue field. You’ll want the open edge facing to your right if you’re the person on the fly side, (the edge furthest away from the flagpole) doing the triangle folding.

Now fold the folded edge over to meet the open edge.

Start the triangular folding by bringing the striped corner of the folded edge over to the open edge.

Fold the outer point inward, parallel with the open edge to form a second triangle.

Continue repeating these triangle folds until nearly the entire length of the flag is folded into a triangle. Ensure you’re keeping each triangle taut while folding.

Tuck the remaining flag margin into the pocket formed by the folds. Folding the margin slightly to match the profile of the triangle will help keep the folding streamlined.

Folded Flag History

In the U.S. Armed Forces, at the ceremony of retreat, the flag is lowered, folded into a triangle and kept under watch throughout the night as a tribute to our nation’s honored dead. The next morning it’s brought out and at the ceremony of reveille, run aloft as a symbol of our belief in the resurrection of the body.

Symbols for the Folds of the Flag

  1. The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.
  2. The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.
  3. The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks, and who gave a portion of his or her life for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.
  4. The fourth fold represents our weaker nature; as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace, as well as in times of war, for His divine guidance.
  5. The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right, but it is still our country, right or wrong.”
  6. The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
  7. The seventh fold is a tribute to our armed forces, for it is through the armed forces that we protect our country and our flag against all enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.
  8. The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor our mother, for whom it flies on Mother’s Day.
  9. The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood, for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded.
  10. The 10th fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since he or she was first born.
  11. The 11th fold, in the eyes of Hebrew citizens, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
  12. The 12th fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son and Holy Ghost.

When the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, “In God We Trust.”

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it has the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under Gen. George Washington and the sailors and Marines who served under Capt. John Paul Jones. They were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the U.S. Armed Forces, preserving for us the rights, privileges and freedoms we enjoy today.

The origin of this Flag Folding history and symbols is unknown, however some sources attribute it to the Gold Star Mothers of America while others to an Air Force chaplain stationed at the United States Air Force Academy. Others consider it to be an urban legend. It’s provided as a patriotic service to all and found here on the American Legion website.

For more information on the United States Flag Code and Properly Retiring a Flag, check out the ITS articles below.

  • How to Properly Retire a U.S. Flag
  • A Patriotic Look at the U.S. Flag Code

Please remember to only buy American flags made in America!