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Elisabeth Hasselbeck: The View offered me my chair back

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Elisabeth Hasselbeck shares how she flew back to Nashville after visiting it for a show and tested out a regular, no-fun Tuesday. Nashville Tennessean

In her new book, Hasselbeck, now a Nashvillian, said she at first felt shocked about the offer, but soon thereafter felt grateful for it

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Elisabeth Hasselbeck — in a book to be released Tuesday — said an ABC exec offered her her spot back on daytime talk show The View, where she was co-host from 2003 to 2013.

Her publicist told the Tennessean the offer came last summer.

A publicist from The View did not immediately respond to an email asking to confirm the offer.

In the book, Point of View: A Fresh Look at Work, Faith, and Freedom, Hasselbeck said she at first felt surprised by the offer to give her chair back five days a week.

“The chair they had truly pulled out from under me? That chair?” she wrote.

Hasselbeck said, though, she later was grateful for the offer, which she said she turned down.

MORE: What Elizabeth Hasselbeck had to say about her ‘View’ co-hosts in her new book

“Though I could neither picture myself back in that arena,” she wrote, “nor imagine moving our family out of Nashville — a place God carved out as our home — I could see all He had done in my heart.

Elisabeth Hasselbeck sits down with a reporter from The Tennessean to talk about her move to Nashville and new book at the Hasselbeck’s home, in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday, March 4, 2019. HENRY TAYLOR/The Tennessean Elisabeth Hasselbeck with her former “View” co-host Barbara Walters in 2010. Eileen Blass/USA TODAY Elisabeth Hasselbeck, making her debut on “Fox & friends” in 2013. Richard Drew/AP Elisabeth Hasselbeck sits down with a reporter from The Tennessean to talk about her move to Nashville and new book at the Hasselbeck’s home, in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday, March 4, 2019. HENRY TAYLOR/The Tennessean Elisabeth Hasselbeck on ‘The View’ in 208 Steve Fenn, ABC Elisabeth Hasselbeck — pictured here in her Nashville home — says ABC offered her her job back on The View last summer. She said she turned it down, in part, because she didn’t want to move her family out of Middle Tennessee HENRY TAYLOR/The Tennessean Whoopi Goldberg, from left, Joy Behar, Barbara Walters, Elisabeth Hasselbeck and Sherri Shepherd in September 2010, when Walters returned to ‘The View’ after recovering from heart surgery. EILEEN BLASS/USA TODAY Elisabeth Hasselbeck poses for a picture at the Hasselbecks’ home, in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday, March 4, 2019. Henry Taylor/The Tennessean Actress Vanessa Redgrave, center, with Whoopi Goldberg, far left, Joy Behar, Sherri Shepherd and Elisabeth Hasselbeck for an episode of “The View,” which aired May 14, 2010. Steve Fenn/ABC She left “The View” in 2013 for a gig with “Fox & Friends,” making her debut that fall. She exited the Fox News program in 2015 to be a full-time mom. Richard Drew, AP Elisabeth Hasselbeck sits down with a reporter from The Tennessean to talk about her move to Nashville and new book at the Hasselbeck’s home, in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday, March 4, 2019. HENRY TAYLOR/The Tennessean Elisabeth Hasselbeck, front and center, joins Titans’ wives and players in a visit to The Next Door, a residential rehab program for women in addiction in Nashville Submitted Elisabeth Hasselbeck, in Titans gear, cheers at Nissan Stadium, where her brother-in-law, Matt Hasselbeck, used to be the quarterback. submitted Backstage poster from when Elisabeth Hasselbeck served as guest announcer May 30, 2015 submitted

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“He healed the wound of disappointment and betrayal, and He provided me with gratitude.”

Hasselbeck served as the lone conservative voice on The View, which declined to renew her contract in 2013. Within months of leaving the show, she became a co-host of FOX & Friends morning on Fox News.

MORE: Elisabeth Hasselbeck, ex-NFL QB husband moving to Nashville

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Two years later, she left that show and moved to Nashville with her husband, former NFL quarterback and ESPN commentator Tim Hasselbeck, and their children.

Hasselbeck’s book, in hardback, comes out Tuesday (March 26), selling for $23 at stores and online.

A story on Hasselbeck and her move to Nashville will appear in the Sunday Tennessean’s Portfolio section.

Hasselbeck also will discuss her new book at a girls night out event April 4 at the Church of the City in Franklin. Tickets are $25.

Doing stories that make our community better takes times and resources. A Tennessean subscription gives you unlimited access to stories that make a difference in your life and the lives of those around you. You also get the ability to tap into news from the USA TODAY Network’s 109 local sites.

Reach Brad Schmitt at [email protected] or 615-259-8384 or on Twitter @bradschmitt.

Meghan McCain and Joy Behar may not always see eye to eye on The View these days, but their workplace tension pales in comparison to the tumultuous relationship between former co-panelists Elisabeth Hasselbeck and Rosie O’Donnell, according to new revelations.

While the strain between Elisabeth and Rosie has died down in recent years, a new excerpt from the upcoming book The Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of The View has reignited their 12-year saga. To get a better idea of what’s fueling the most recent headlines, you have to go back to when Rosie and Elisabeth’s paths first crossed.

November 24, 2003: Elisabeth Hasselbeck is announced as the new co-host of The View.

After Lisa Ling left the panel, Barbara Walters quickly began searching for a replacement. Enter the former Survivor contestant and host of Style Channel’s The Look for Less, Elisabeth Hasselbeck.

Elisabeth Hasselbeck and Barbara Walters together in 2004. Getty

Barbara revealed that they had a “rough time” picking a new person for the gig, but ultimately decided on Elisabeth. Also in the running at the time: Rachel Campos of The Real World: San Francisco and Erin Hershey Presley from Port Charles.

April 28, 2006: Rosie O’ Donnell says she’s joining The View.

By the time Rosie came on the show three years later, Elisabeth was known as the staunch conservative voice on the panel. The show had already taken a much more political turn – which set up left-leaning Rosie and right-leaning Elisabeth to get into some heated conversations.

Elisabeth Hasselbeck, Rosie O’Donnell, Barbara Walters, and Joy Behar pose for a promotional photo together in 2006. Getty

Additionally, Rosie was a notable critic of former President George W. Bush (she would write about his policies in her blog), a small preview of what was about to unfold when she joined the show in the fall.

April 25, 2007: Rosie announces she’s leaving the program.

Despite raising The View ratings and launching what Barbara referred to as “an exciting, fun-filled, provocative” year, Rosie and the talk show reportedly failed to reach a contract extension. It was made clear that Rosie wasn’t leaving because of bad blood between herself or any of her co-hosts — rather, it allegedly came down to salary negotiations and Rosie not wanting to commit to three more years. And so, Rosie announced that in June, she would be walking away from The View.

May 17, 2007: Rosie comes under fire for comments about the military.

Before leaving, Rosie got some major heat when she dropped a rhetorical question on The View about the military.

“Sixty-hundred-and-fifty-five-thousand Iraqi civilians dead. Who are the terrorists?” Rosie said. “If you were in Iraq and another country, the United States, the richest in the world, invaded your country and killed 655,000 of your citizens, what would you call us?”

Not surprisingly, this didn’t sit well with many conservative critics, who claimed Rosie was labeling the troops as “terrorists.” Little did Rosie know that her comments would turn out to be a major talking point in one of the biggest View blowups in the show’s history six days later.

May 23, 2007: Rosie and Elisabeth get into huge fight over the Iraq War.

On the following Monday’s show, Elisabeth asked Rosie to clarify what she meant. Rosie, however, chose not to respond. Two days later, the tension mounted between Rosie and Elisabeth. Ultimately, Rosie decided to tell the world why she was staying silent on the matter.

“Because here’s how it gets spun in the media: ‘Rosie, big fat lesbian loud Rosie, attacks innocent, pure Christian Elisabeth,'” Rosie said. This prompted Elisabeth to call her assessment “unfair.”

“I just don’t understand why it’s my fault if people spin words that you put out there or phrases that suggest things,” Elisabeth explained. “And I gave you an opportunity two days ago to clarify the statement that got you in trouble on all those things.”

Rosie responded by asking Elisabeth if “as her friend,” she believed that “troops were terrorists.” Elisabeth eventually responded and said no but told her she needed to “defend her own insinuations.” In response, Rosie called Elisabeth a “coward.”

May 25, 2007: ABC announces that Rosie wants to be released from her contract.

After the heated exchange, Rosie decided to leave three weeks before her contract was up (on June 21). She said, in part, it was because she didn’t like the way producers had split the screen when Elisabeth and Rosie were arguing. On top of that, Rosie was allegedly really “hurt by Elisabeth.”

May 29, 2007: Elisabeth claims she and Rosie are talking.

Almost a week after Rosie and Elisabeth’s on-air spat, Elisabeth revealed on The View that she and the comedian were “in communication a lot” and talked about “the power of forgiveness” over Memorial Day weekend.

Rosie, on the other hand, reportedly wrote on her blog that they “hadn’t spoken” and that they only had exchanged one brief email.

Rosie O’Donnell speaks in New York City in 2007. Getty

“I never tried harder to be friends with someone than I did with her,” Rosie allegedly said on her website. “But I don’t think we ever got there, or anywhere close.”

January 10, 2008: Rosie reportedly sends baby gifts to Elisabeth.

Almost a year after their big fight, Rosie told People that they had done a complete 180, and made up. Rosie even bought Elisabeth a baby gift for her then newborn son, Taylor Thomas.

“He’s very, very cute. I saw him on TV, and I sent him a lovely gift, and been e-mailing each other. And peace prevails,” Rosie declared. She also revealed that the pair had “stayed in touch” via email.

January 25, 2010: Rosie talks about her old friendship with Elisabeth on Oprah.

The topic of Rosie and Elisabeth’s friendship was brought up again on Oprah according to E News, where Rosie opened up about the whole incident from her perspective.

Rosie O’Donnell and Oprah together in 2011. Getty

“We had a friendship in some capacity, and there’s something about somebody being different on TV toward you than they are in the dressing room,” Rosie said about Elisabeth. “It didn’t really ring true for me. I just felt it was a betrayal of my friendship, and what you saw there was my hurt feelings.”

March 2013: Elisabeth leaves The View.

According to Elisabeth’s new book Point of View, she was fired in 2013 and told there wasn’t “anything she could’ve done.”

Elisabeth Hasselbeck on The View in 2013. Getty

While Elisabeth went on to write about her friendships with Whoopi Goldberg, Joy Behar, and Barbara over the course of her 10 years on the show, she doesn’t mention Rosie in the book.

May 16, 2014: Elisabeth and Rosie sit next to each other for Barbara Walters’s farewell.

Despite Elisabeth’s hard feelings over getting axed, everything seemed to be a-okay by the time Barbara Walters’s last episode on The View rolled around. Elisabeth and Rosie were all smiles in front of the cameras, and even ended up sitting next to each other during the segment.

But behind cameras, both Rosie and Elisabeth painted a different picture. On Twitter, Rosie said that on the day of Barbara’s goodbye episode (which featured all the women of The View), Elisabeth was “hiding in her dressing room” until she walked by and said hello. After that Elisabeth apparently wanted to “take a selfie.”

July 9, 2014: Elisabeth goes after Rosie when it’s announced that she will be going back to The View.

Two months later, tensions seemed to be rise again. On Fox and Friends, where Elisabeth was a co-host, she expressed that she wasn’t very happy to hear that Rosie was returning to the TV show.

“Here comes to The View the very woman who’s spit in the face of our military, spit in the face of her own network, and, really spit in the face of a person who stood by her and had civilized debates for the time that she was there — coming back with a bunch of control, ready to regain The View with a seat at that table,” Elisabeth declared, before claiming that Rosie had taken credit for producing the Barbara Walters segment on the show.

She continued:

“Go back to the reunion show for Barbara, how odd is this? When you have the woman who again insinuated that our own troops are terrorists in Iraq at the time, left the show … while still at the end of her contract — to have such ease the day of Barbara’s goodbye show was shocking to me … She walked around with a lot of control and then when I had the chance to talk to her, Rosie herself, told me, on-set while we were mic-ed up, that she produced the reunion show to have everybody together and that it was her idea. Now, would you think the woman who left the way that she did would be producing Barbara’s goodbye show? Here’s the shocker, it was actually her ‘Hello Show.'”

March 25, 2019: Rosie talks about her “crush” on Elisabeth.

Rosie ended up leaving The View again in February of 2015, to “concentrate on her family” after splitting with her wife Michelle Rounds. And up until recently, that was the last of Elisabeth and Rosie’s saga … that is, until reporter Ramin Setoodeh interviewed her for a new book.

In a newly released excerpt from Ramin’s book The Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of The View (available on April 2), Rosie reveals that she had “a bit of a crush” on Elisabeth and “loved her.”

Elisabeth and Rosie pose in New York City. Getty

“But not that I wanted to kiss her. I wanted to support, raise, elevate her, like she was the freshman star shortstop and I was the captain of the team. I was going to Scottie Pippen her. If I was Jordan, I was going to give her the ball and let her shoot. But it was in no way sexualized.”

What’s more though, Rosie declared that there were “underlying lesbian undertones on both parts.”

“She was the MVP of a Division 1 softball team for two years that won the finals … There are not many, in my life, girls with such athletic talent on sports teams that are traditionally male that aren’t at least a little bit gay.”

March 26, 2019: Elisabeth says she’s “disturbed” by Rosie’s claims, but forgives her.

On Tuesday, Elisabeth appeared on The View to talk about her new book and addressed the claims Rosie made. In short, she wasn’t very happy about them, calling what she said, “reckless, untrue, and not only insulting, disturbing when it comes to how she felt about somebody in the workplace.”

Elisabeth continued to call Rosie’s accusations wrong, and said, “whether you’re a man or whether you’re a woman, and you’re objectifying women in the workplace, it’s wrong.” She also labeled Rosie’s softball commentary as “an unfair stereotype.” All in all though, Elisabeth said she “totally forgives” Rosie for what she said.

“I really hope that we can be at peace and that we can both hold our beliefs in one hand and hold each other’s hand in the other and still have a relationship that’s at peace,” Elisabeth said.

So far, Rosie has not responded to Elisabeth’s call for peace.

Related Stories Kayla Keegan News and Entertainment Editor Kayla Keegan covers all things in the entertainment, pop culture, and celebrity space for Good Housekeeping.

Rosie O’Donnell Says She’s ‘Hoping for the Best’ After Reported Split from Fiancée

Rosie O’Donnell is speaking out amid reports that she and fiancée Elizabeth Rooney have split.

On Monday, the television personality opened up about her relationship status in an interview with Extra at an event for her non-profit Rosie’s Theater Kids. O’Donnell, 57, told the outlet that she is “hoping for the best” and admitted it is “hard” to navigate her relationships in the public eye.

“I’m good,” she said. “We are still figuring things out — it’s hard in the public light … It’s hard for a person who is a normal person in a normal job. I’m kind of used to it … We are trying to figure it out … I am a hopeful person and I am hoping for the best.”

Instead of bringing Rooney as her date to Monday’s event, O’Donnell told Extra that she brought her children with her.

“They are supposed to be here and we are supposed to be taking photos with the family — my children and their respective dates,” she shared. “It’s a big night. They each brought their respective boyfriend or girlfriend.”

Image zoom Rosie O’Donnell Bruce Glikas/WireImage

RELATED: Rosie O’Donnell Says Elisabeth Hasselbeck Took Her ‘Crush’ Comments Out of Context: ‘She Knows’

In late October, it was reported that O’Donnell and Rooney had split after being engaged for nearly one year. (A rep for O’Donnell had no comment when contacted by PEOPLE at the time.)

O’Donnell also seemingly deleted several Instagram photos related to her engagement to Rooney.

Image zoom Elizabeth Rooney/Instagram; Inset: Astrid Stawiarz/Getty

After keeping their relationship out of the spotlight, O’Donnell had confirmed the couple’s engagement in October 2018 after dating for a year.

Calling Rooney a “wonderful woman,” the former The View co-host opened up about the romance earlier this year, explaining how they made their long-distance relationship work.

“She lives in Boston now and I live here in New York. It’s been a long-distance thing. It’s been great. I think she’s a wonderful woman,” said O’Donnell, who proudly praised Rooney for being an Army veteran and an undefeated boxer during her time of service. “She’s very much an equal, she’s very much her own person and loves what she does. She’s a pretty unbelievable young woman.”

RELATED: Rosie O’Donnell and Fiancée Elizabeth Rooney Split After Year-Long Engagement: Report

Image zoom Elizabeth Rooney and Rosie O’Donnell Astrid Stawiarz/Getty

O’Donnell also joked about the pair’s 23-year age gap.

“I keep telling her I’m too old for her. But she doesn’t seem to care,” she said. “She’s like, ‘I was in the Army! I put my life on the line every day you think I don’t know who I want to date?’ I’m like, ‘All right I guess that’s true.’ She has a lot of good points.”

O’Donnell has been married twice. She shares four children — son Parker, 24, son Blake, 19, and daughter Vivienne, 16, and 22-year-old daughter Chelsea — with first wife Kelli Carpenter, who she was with from 2004 to 2007. Her second ex-wife, Michelle Rounds, died of an apparent suicide in September 2017 at age 46. They share one daughter, Dakota, 6.

KeepReading…

More fallout from “The View” was unearthed on Thursday, this time between Rosie O’Donnell and Whoopi Goldberg.

“Whoopi Goldberg was as mean as anyone has ever been on television to me, personally–while I was sitting there,” O’Donnell said, according to an excerpt from Ramin Setoodeh’s book “Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of The View” obtained by E! News. “Worse than Fox News. The worst experience I’ve ever had on live television was interacting with her.”

O’Donnell replaced Meredith Vieira as co-host on the talk show in 2006, only to leave a year later after she and fellow panelist Elisabeth Hasselbeck got into a heated political argument, according to E! News. O’Donnell later returned to “The View” in 2014, leaving again the following year to focus on her family and health.

Also Read: Elisabeth Hasselbeck Calls Rosie O’Donnell’s ‘Crush’ Comments ‘Disturbing’ and ‘Objectifying’ (Video)

Setoodeh’s book details the behind-the-scenes feud between O’Donnell and Goldberg, with the former complaining that the latter would shut down her ideas.

“Some people would say, ‘What’s going on with you and Whoopi?’” O’Donnell said in the excerpt. “I was like, ‘Are you watching the show? It’s pretty much right there.’ I have no desire for a public feud.”

O’Donnell also commented on a situation when she and Goldberg got into a fight about racism with guest co-host Laverne Cox.

“I thought my head was going to explode,” O’Donnell said. “My doctor called me and said, ‘Come in right now. Your heart rate during that is dangerous for you. I don’t want you doing that show anymore.’”

Also Read: Rosie O’Donnell Calls Out ‘Morning Joe’ for Allowing Trump to Trash Her in 2007

But O’Donnell maintains that she always has respect for Goldberg.

“She’s a minority, feminist, smart, funny, groundbreaking legend who is black in America. I’m never going to not have respect for Whoopi Goldberg. But that was a painful experience, personally and professionally.”

Representatives for “The View” and for Goldberg herself did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

O’Donnell has also recently been in the headlines for her comments that she had a “crush” on Hasselbeck, has who called the comments “disturbing” and “objectifying.” O’Donnell responded with a tweet saying, “hey eh – my crush on u was not sexual – sorry u got scared – surely u recall b4 it all went wrong – i never objectified u – i did find u fantastic – broadway shows – my pool -we were friends once – god love ya kid – i always did.”

hey eh – my crush on u was not sexual – sorry u got scared – ❤️surely u recall b4 it all went wrong – i never objectified u – i did find u fantastic – broadway shows – my pool -we were friends once ❤️ god love ya kid – i always did #hasselbeck #raminSUX

— ROSIE (@Rosie) March 26, 2019

‘The View’ Book: Rosie O’Donnell Reveals Secret Crush on Elisabeth Hasselbeck

For most of Season 10 of “The View,” which aired from 2006 to 2007, Rosie O’Donnell and Elisabeth Hasselbeck publicly feuded on TV. But in a new book, O’Donnell reveals more complicated emotions about her former conservative colleague.

In “Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of ‘The View’” by Variety‘s Ramin Setoodeh, O’Donnell talks about the infamous day in May 2007 where she had a 10-minute fight on TV with Hasselbeck about the Iraq War. An excerpt of the chapter, “My Mouth Is a Weapon,” which details what happened and O’Donnell’s subsequent departure from “,” will appear in this week’s magazine edition of Variety.

To many viewers, it looked like O’Donnell and Hasselbeck were mortal enemies. But O’Donnell says that wasn’t the case. “I loved her,” O’Donnell says in the book. O’Donnell recalls how she initially tried to mold Hasselbeck by giving her advice about how to debate on TV. “Here’s what I said, ‘I’m the senior. She’s the freshman. I’ve got a really good player on the freshman team, but I have to teach her how to loosen up.’”

There was turmoil behind-the-scenes that year, as O’Donnell tried to take control of the show from creator Barbara Walters and executive producer Bill Geddie. Initially, Hasselbeck sided with O’Donnell.

And then there was this: Joy Behar speculated that O’Donnell had a crush on Hasselbeck, which O’Donnell confirms in the book. “I think there were underlying lesbian undertones on both parts,” O’Donnell says about her working relationship with Hasselbeck. O’Donnell backed up this idea with some dubious evidence. “I think this is something that will hurt her if you write it. She was the MVP of a Division 1 softball team for two years that won the finals. There are not many, in my life, girls with such athletic talent on sports teams that are traditionally male that aren’t at least a little bit gay.”

Although O’Donnell was attracted to Hasselbeck, she never wanted to act on it. “There was a little bit of a crush,” O’Donnell says in the book. “But not that I wanted to kiss her. I wanted to support, raise, elevate her, like she was the freshman star shortstop and I was the captain of the team.” O’Donnell changed sports metaphors from baseball to basketball. “I was going to Scottie Pippen her. If I was Jordan, I was going to give her and the ball and let her shoot. But it was in no way sexualized.”

O’Donnell said that she was deeply hurt by Hasselbeck, and their fight on TV was about more than just politics. The final straw was when Hasselbeck wouldn’t defend O’Donnell from conservative critics. “It felt like a lover breaking up,” O’Donnell says about her last day on TV with Hasselbeck. “The fight that we had, to me as a gay woman, it felt like this: ‘You don’t love me as much as I love you.’ ‘I’ve taken care of you.’ ‘You have not.’ ‘How could you do that to me?’ ‘I didn’t do anything to you.’”

The book also reveals that as a result of the fight, internal research at ABC indicated that Hasselbeck’s likability numbers plummeted with viewers and they never recovered. Seven years later, in March 2013, Hasselbeck was fired from “The View,” because the network wanted the program to become less political. ABC executives thought Hasselbeck was too “polarizing” and she was hurting the show.

When the show’s executive producer Geddie told Hasselbeck that her contract wasn’t being renewed, she started to cry. “Did she know it was coming? I don’t think so,” Geddie says in the book, confirming for the first time that Hasselbeck was fired. “She was emotional. I was emotional.”

“Ladies Who Punch” will be available in bookstores on April 2.

Rosie v. Elisabeth: The gloves are off!

The building war of words between “The View” co-hosts Rosie O’Donnell and Elisabeth Hasselbeck exploded Wednesday into a heated on-air exchange when O’Donnell charged her younger co-host with failing to defend her against conservative critics — and Hasselbeck let loose.
The impromptu dispute, which occurred during the show’s “Hot Topics” segment, lasted for nearly 10 minutes and led to both women calling each other cowardly. The fight ended only when co-host Joy Behar demanded that the director take the show to commercial.
A spokesman for “The View” did not immediately comment on the bitter exchange between the two women, who until now have insisted that they are friends off-air. But on her personal blog, O’Donnell responded to a fan who expressed sympathy about the fight: “i am glad 2 b out.” To another, the talk host wrote in her usual free verse:
“it may be time
to be done
endings r hard 4 all
emotions r high
talking is tough”
Later in the afternoon, O’Donnell posted a poem titled “ceasefire” in which she said her partner Kelli’s birthday is today and that she will not be at work.
The argument capped a tumultuous season on the ABC daytime program, which has been rocked with controversy ever since O’Donnell joined the program in September. Her outspoken views, especially about the Bush administration and the war in Iraq, have triggered frequent debates with Hasselbeck, the only conservative on the panel.
Their back-and-forth has helped buoy ratings, but O’Donnell announced last month that she is leaving when her contract ends in June, saying that she and ABC couldn’t agree to terms about extending her relationship with the program.
In the weeks that followed, O’Donnell initially appeared more relaxed on the program, saying she didn’t want to debate Hasselbeck anymore, especially since the 29-year-old is pregnant.
But in the last several days, the two have tussled over a rhetorical comment O’Donnell made about the number of civilian deaths in Iraq that appeared to equate U.S. military actions with terrorism.
On Monday’s show, O’Donnell complained that conservative critics had twisted what she said by claiming that she called the troops “terrorists.” She asked Hasselbeck if she thought O’Donnell believed the soldiers were terrorists. Rather than answer, Hasselbeck urged her to clarify what she had meant, at which point O’Donnell reiterated her support for the troops.
On Wednesday, O’Donnell initially appeared reluctant to be dragged into the debate again.
“Because here’s how it gets spun in the media: ‘Rosie, big fat lesbian loud Rosie, attacks innocent pure Christian Elisabeth,’ ” she said.
Hasselbeck called that “unfair,” adding: “I just don’t understand why it’s my fault if people spin words that you put out there or phrases that suggest things. And I gave you an opportunity two days ago to clarify the statement that got you in trouble on all those things.”
“That got me in trouble?” O’Donnell repeated sarcastically. “As a friend, you gave me the opportunity. That was very sweet of you. I was asking if you, who actually knows me, do you believe I think our troops are terrorists, Elisabeth?”
Hasselbeck hesitated.
“Do you believe that, yes or no?” O’Donnell pressed.
Hasselbeck raised her finger in the air. “Excuse me. Let me speak.”
“You’re going to doublespeak,” O’Donnell said. “It’s just a yes or a no.”
“I am not a double speaker, and I don’t put suggestions out there that lead people to think things and then not answer my own question, OK?” Hasselbeck shot back. “I don’t believe that you believe troops are terrorists. I have said that before. But when you say something like 650,000 Iraqis are dead, we invaded them … ”
“It’s true!” O’Donnell responded.
“Let me finish!” Hasselbeck said.
“You don’t like facts!” O’Donnell retorted.
Hasselbeck’s tone grew angrier: “I am all about facts. You know that. You tell me not to use facts because you want me to go only on emotion. Guess what? I like facts.”
As the tone grew more heated, Behar and guest co-host Sherri Shepherd fidgeted uncomfortably and finally pretended to get up from the table to break the tension.
But the two kept at it, and the producers switched to a split screen to showcase their back-and-forth.
O’Donnell said she was hurt that Hasselbeck didn’t defend her.
“I am certainly not going to be the person for you to explain your thoughts,” Hasselbeck retorted, pointing her finger at her co-host. “They’re your thoughts. Defend your own insinuations! Defend your own thoughts!”
“Frankly, every time I defend them, it’s poor little Elisabeth that I’m picking on,” O’Donnell responded. “That’s why I’m not going to fight with you anymore, because it’s absurd. So for three weeks, you can say all the Republican crap that you want. I’m not going to do it.”
“It’s much easier to fight someone like Donald Trump, isn’t it?” Hasselbeck spat, alluding to O’Donnell’s much-publicized feud with the real estate magnet. “Because he’s obnoxious.”
The audience oohed in surprise and O’Donnell looked shocked.
“I think it’s sad because I don’t understand how there can be such hurt feelings when all I did was say, ‘Look, why don’t you tell everybody what you said?’ ” Hasselbeck continued. “I did that as a friend.”
“Every day since September I have told you that I support the troops,” O’Donnell shot back. “I asked you if you believed what the Republican pundits were saying. You said nothing, and that’s cowardly.”
“No, no, no!” Hasselbeck said furiously. “You will not call me a coward, because No. 1, I sit here every single day, open my heart and tell people exactly what I believe.”
“So do I!” O’Donnell said.
“Do not call me a coward, Rosie.”
“It was cowardly.”
“It was not cowardly, it was honest.”
Behar broke in: “Is there no commercial in this show?”
Hasselbeck continued: “I’ll tell you what’s cowardly. Asking a rhetorical question that you never answer yourself. That is cowardly.”
Behar had had enough. “Who is directing this show?” she said. “Let’s go to commercial!”

How Rosie O’Donnell vs. Elisabeth Hasselbeck Predicted Our Current Political Discourse

But before we get into the impact of that moment, let’s get some backstory:

Rosie O’Donnell made a name for herself in movies like A League of Their Own, The Flintstones, Sleepless in Seattle, and Harriet the Spy. But with her talk show, The Rosie O’Donnell Show, she really shot to fame, like a koosh ball arcing into a studio audience. She came to be known as the “Queen of Nice.” She kept conversations with her celebrity guests fun and light. Still in the closet, she played up her love of Tom Cruise. She made strangers’ lives better by giving away scholarships, donations, and gifts. She sang show tunes and geeked out over Barbara Streisand. She did everything Ellen now gets to do (thanks to Rosie paving the way).

Photo: ABC

After The Rosie Show ended, six seasons later in 2002, Rosie left the limelight to focus on her family. It wasn’t long before people in the industry tried to coax her back onto daytime television. She turned down all offers — until one of her childhood idols, Barbara Walters, asked her to be the main host of The View. She agreed, and returned to the space that put her on the map.

But the Rosie that showed up on set in 2006 was not the Rosie America had grown accustomed to. This new Rosie was an out lesbian who was no longer afraid to speak her mind on politics and everything else. Rather than keeping it cute, Rosie had found her voice and wasn’t going to give it up without a fight. After years of saying what America was ready to hear, she switched gears to what America needed to hear.

Her stint on The View lasted only a year, and was filled with drama at every turn. Fox News regularly attacked her for her views on the Iraq War and President George W. Bush. This, remember, was in the wake of the Dixie Chicks being blacklisted for their political opinions, which created an environment that equated criticism of Bush and his administration’s policies with being anti-American or unpatriotic. Donald Trump also got into the action, attacking Rosie for bringing up his bankruptcies and mocking his combover, calling her “a woman out of control” and threatening to sue her (“Rosie will rue the words she said. I’ll most likely sue her for making those false statements — and it’ll be fun. Rosie’s a loser. A real loser. I look forward to taking lots of money from my nice fat little Rosie”).

As if that wasn’t enough, Rosie had to regularly go toe-to-toe with panelist Elisabeth Hasselbeck, who was aided by an executive producer who — rumor has it — fed Hasselback with Republican party talking points every morning. Every weekday, in front of millions, Elisabeth would dish out an entrée of alternative facts, and Rosie would take the bait.

The near-constant sparring resulted in numerous news cycles of Rosie being painted as the alleged bully and antagonist to Hasselbeck’s innocent-seeming, pretty, conservative Christian (one Los Angeles Times piece went with the headline “The ‘Queen of Nice’ Goes Nuts”). The fact that Hasselbeck was pregnant for this particular season of The View didn’t necessarily help optics.

Rosie and Barbara in happier times. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Each time some feud blossomed, The View enjoyed huge ratings, leading to a 17% increase in viewers from the previous Rosie-less season. Despite having a hit on their hands, things weren’t too joyous behind the scenes. A culture of distrust began to build; Rosie felt as though Walters, whom she thought of as a surrogate mother, didn’t have her back — and that Walters and the show’s producers were setting her up for more and more fireworks with Hasselbeck.

On May 23, 2007, everything finally boiled over. Comedian Joy Behar started a conversation about Al Gore and Jimmy Carter’s belief that Bush was the country’s worst president, and listed Bush’s bad qualities (his handling of torture at Abu Ghraib; his response to Hurricane Katrina; his repeated mispronunciation of “nuclear”; the time he choked on a pretzel). Joy, Elisabeth, and Sherri Shepherd (a woman who, on a different episode of The View, said the world might actually be flat) got into it for several minutes, while Rosie sat quietly. Tired of having her words misconstrued by Fox News every night, she was waiting for the clock to run out on her contract in a few weeks. But she couldn’t help but say something in response to Elisabeth calling Iraqis our enemies.

Things quickly exploded:

Six uninterrupted minutes of an epic, messy, personal fight ensued. The curtain was pulled back to reveal not just TV personalities debating “hot topics,” but one human being feeling betrayed and used by someone she thought was a friend.

This moment evokes and pokes holes in an idea that’s been batted around a lot since the 2016 election — that the way to heal the divisions in the country is for people from opposite ends of the political spectrum to engage in conversation. (If only liberals and conservatives had broken bread and chatted about their differences over some Budweisers, the thinking goes, then the country wouldn’t have elected a man who called Mexican immigrants “rapists,” mocked a disabled reporter, promised to ban Muslims, and admitted to sexual assault on camera.) But no matter how good anyone’s intentions may be, it can be impossible to have a productive dialogue when one person’s belief system is founded in another’s oppression, or argues against another’s humanity and right to exist. There’s isn’t anywhere to go from there.

During the back-and-forth, Rosie noticed that the producers had placed a split-screen between the two women so that viewers at home could watch each of their faces getting redder and angrier. The split-screen had never been used on the program before, and Rosie has said that she believes they crafted it specifically for this inevitability, which they seemed to hope would happen someday. They got their wish, and Rosie didn’t return to the show the next day — or the following day, or the one after that. A few weeks before her contract expired, Rosie quit.

Last week marked that moment’s tenth anniversary. A lot has happened in the past 10 years, but has our discourse really changed that much? After a detour to the left during the oasis of Obama, we’re right back into a timeline where criticizing the President or his administration is seen as unpatriotic. These days, President Trump will tweet about any celebrity who criticizes him (Rosie is still one of his favorite targets, so much so that he randomly brought her up during one of the 2016 presidential debates). And, beyond celebrities, working journalists are regularly attacked — figuratively and literally — for reporting the facts. Trump declaring the press “the enemy of the people” and “fake news” has engendered a culture in which a Montana Republican seeking election body-slams a reporter for asking a question, and it’s not even the most shocking news item of the day.

Every year, reality TV thrives more and more on conflict, overturned tables, wig tugs, and televised celebrity firings. It’s gotten so bad that, on Love & Hip Hop Hollywood, one woman vomited into her hand and threw it in another woman’s face. Has reality TV influenced us into becoming more conflict-oriented? Or has reality TV simply been holding up a mirror to what we already were? It’s hard to say, but something that’s clear is that this moment between Rosie and Elisabeth foretold what we’re living through now: a culture of division, and a culture in which someone speaking or reporting truth will be smeared or punished.

Since their epic showdown, Rosie has returned to stand-up and acting. Hasselbeck moved over to Fox News, where she was able to make statements like “Why has the Black Lives Matter movement not been classified yet as a hate group?” before eventually being replaced by another young blonde woman. In 2014, when Elisabeth heard that Rosie was asked to return as a host of The View, she did not take the high road: “What could ruin a vacation more than to hear news like this?” she said. “Talk about not securing the border. Here comes to The View the very woman who spit in the face of our military, spit in the face of her own network and really in the face of a person who stood by her and had civilized debates for the time that she was there. I am happy to have a #momversation about why I would never defend her 2007 comments. #letfreedomring.”

Rosie O’Donnell denies ‘grooming’ Elisabeth Hasselbeck: ‘I was loving her’

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Elisabeth Hasselbeck says she sobbed after learning her contract wouldn’t be renewed for “The View.” USA TODAY

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Rosie O’Donnell is responding to her former “View” co-host and sparring partner, Elisabeth Hasselbeck who described the comedian’s recent comments that she had a crush on her as “disturbing” and “offensive.”

The two “View” hosts, whose tenures overlapped during the 2006-2007 season, often battled over politics.

O’Donnell made headlines Monday for comments she made in “Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of ‘The View’” by Variety‘s New York Bureau Chief, Ramin Setoodeh, which was shared with the outlet. According to the excerpt, O’Donnell spoke of wanting to mentor her cohost and harboring “a little bit of a crush” that was “in no way sexualized.”

O’Donnell reiterated that stance on Instagram Live Wednesday, following appearances by Hasselbeck promoting her new book, “Point of View,” which details her asthma-attack-inducing firing from “The View” and her relationships with her co-hosts, though O’Donnell is unmentioned.

“Listen, I said when they interviewed me about it, it was not a sexual crush,” she said. “There are so many people I have crushes on, starting with Julie Andrews when I was a kid, all the way through right now, Russell Brand – total crush on that guy. It doesn’t mean I want to have sex with them. I think we should have all learned by the Tom Cruise crush scenario. It doesn’t mean that for me. It just means a crush.

“You know what I decided when I took the job on ‘The View’ and she was the one everyone was worried was going to be a big (expletive), Hasselbeck?” she said. “I thought to myself, ‘I’m gonna love her to death. No matter what, I’m gonna love her. No matter what she throws at me, that’s going to be my mantra.’ “

O’Donnell also expressed exasperation at Hasselbeck’s revelation that she “immediately started praying” about how to handle the situation after learning of O’Donnell’s remarks.

“She was so afraid of the concept of a lesbian having a crush on her that she had to go directly to Jesus,” O’Donnell said. “Do not pass go, do not collect $200.”

When a commenter brought up the subject of depression, which O’Donnell has been open about, she said she still struggles.

“There are days where it’s really difficult, like days when Elisabeth Hasselbeck says you were grooming her… I wasn’t grooming her, I was loving her,” she said. “She couldn’t take it that somebody was nice to her. She liked me back. It wasn’t like a sexual thing, but she liked me back. We were friends, and I have proof. Watch all those episodes.”

O’Donnell also didn’t have much nice to say about Setoodeh, the author of “Ladies Who Punch.”

She described him as “a man taking a history of ‘The View’ and creating only the stories that were negative and conflicted between everyone. And then he named his book ‘Ladies Who Punch.’ So, he’s a misogynist… and I’m disappointed in him as a human being.”

A day earlier, O’Donnell had taken a softer approach to dealing with Hasselbeck on social media.

She added, “i never objectified u,” she continued, denying an accusation Hasselbeck made on airwaves, “i did find u fantastic – broadway shows – my pool -we were friends once god love ya kid – i always did”

hey eh – my crush on u was not sexual – sorry u got scared – ❤️surely u recall b4 it all went wrong – i never objectified u – i did find u fantastic – broadway shows – my pool -we were friends once ❤️ god love ya kid – i always did #hasselbeck#raminSUX

— ROSIE (@Rosie) March 26, 2019

The “Sleepless in Seattle” actress also retweeted a post that slammed Hasselbeck.

“Thank you @TheView for having Hasselcrack on today, it reminded me how much I can’t stand her,” the post shared by O’Donnell read. “Also, her homophobic rants about @Rosie we’re gross and completely careless on her part. Disappointed that the rest of the co-hosts didn’t step in to defend her.”

On Tuesday’s “View,” Hasselbeck said she respected O’Donnell “as a co-host and as a person in the office as I think it should happen in all workplaces.”

Hasselbeck, who played softball in college, also addressed O’Donnell’s theory that “there are not many, in my life, girls with such athletic talent on sports teams that are traditionally male that aren’t at least a little bit gay.”

Hasselbeck said it was “a lie” and “reckless” to ascribe sexuality to athleticism. “Just because you’re athletic doesn’t have anything to do with your sexual preference,” she said. “It just doesn’t.”

Elisabeth Hasselbeck calls Rosie O’Donnell’s comments saying she had a crush on her “reckless, untrue, and not only insulting, disturbing when it comes to how she felt about somebody in the workplace.”
“I feel like I have the grace of forgiveness … I forgive Rosie.” pic.twitter.com/vRSywyLiuv

— The View (@TheView) March 26, 2019

She also stopped by another show she used to host – “Fox & Friends” – where she was asked about O’Donnell’s remarks about her in “Ladies Who Punch.”

Hasselbeck said her reaction was to turn to God and “just (start) praying, and I pray now the Holy Spirit gives me the words to articulate this, but I think it can be addressed with both truth and grace.”

“I feel like the truth is, (with) what she said, if you took her words and you replaced Rosie for Ronald, there would be an objectification of women in the workplace,” the former “Survivor” contestant said. “That is disturbing and it’s wrong. Whether you’re a man or whether you’re a woman, and you’re objectifying women in the workplace, it’s wrong.”

More: Elisabeth Hasselbeck dishes on ‘View’ co-hosts and the day she was fired in ‘Point of View’

More: Whoopi Goldberg ‘OK’ after battling pneumonia, sepsis: ‘I came very, very close’ to death

Speaking directly to O’Donnell, Hasselbeck added: “Rosie, I think it was disturbing to read those things, and it was offensive to me, but I forgive her. I totally forgive you, Rosie. I really hope that we can be at peace and that we can both hold our beliefs in one hand and hold each other’s hands in the other and still have a relationship that’s at peace.

“But, more than that, just like I would pray for my friends, I hope that she has the peace of God,” Hasselbeck continued. “‘Cause Rosie O’Donnell is still seen and known and loved by God, and I hope that she feels that and I hope that she can find, ultimately, the peace. Even more than I want to be at peace with her, I hope she finds that peace ’cause God wants that for her too.”

More: Meghan McCain calls Trump drama ’emotionally exhausting’ after new John McCain remarks

Twenty-one years ago on Aug. 11, 1997, we were introduced to “The View.” A show, where intelligent women discussed their opinions, as well as asked celebrities and political figures the tough questions. Here, we take a look at all of the ladies who have tackled the sometimes-fiery, hot topics, beginning with the OG cast. ANDREW ECCLES/ABC, ABC Veteran journalist Barbara Walters, seen in 2014, created the series and served as co-host and executive producer. Robert Deutsch, USAT In March 2015, with her then co-hosts (left to right) Rosie Perez, Nicolle Wallace, Whoopi Goldberg, Joy Behar and Mario Cantone, she celebrated the show’s 4,000th episode. Lou Rocco, ABC Walters, with then-President Barack Obama in 2010, left her hosting chair in 2014. On her final show, several women in broadcasting paid their respects to the living legend, including Oprah Winfrey, Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images Debbie Matenopoulos, second from right, called Walters her colleague for a brief period, as seen in a photo from the show’s premiere with (from left), Meredith Vieira, guest Tom Selleck, Joy Behar and Star Jones. STEVE FENN, ABC In her early 20s when she landed the gig, Matenopoulos appeared on the show’s first two seasons. Since her exit, she has appeared on the show as a guest co-host, as seen in this Nov. 2016 photo with, from left, Vieira, Jones and Behar. Lou Rocco , ABC Matenopoulos now serves as host for Hallmark’s “Home & Family” talk show. Gregg DeGuire, WireImage Star Jones, second from left with Vieira, Behar and Walters, is another member of the original cast. ED BAILEY, AP Jones with, from left Vieira, Bette Midler, Behar and then-co-host Lisa Ling, stunned her counterparts when she announced her exit in 2006 on air, after learning her contract would not be renewed. “I would have loved for Star to have left and not said ‘I was fired,’ and not make it look like the program was somehow being cruel to her,” Walters told The Associated Press shortly after the incident. ERIC LIEBOWITZ, CBS She now served as executive producer and writer on “Daytime Divas,” a VH1 series about five female cohorts hosting a show called “The Lunch Hour.” Paul Hawthorne, Getty Images Comedian Joy Behar, seen strapping in guest Tom Cruise to keep him from “couch jumping” as Jones looks on, has long brought laughs to the set. Steve Fenn, ABC Behar, with from left, Jones, Walters, Ling and Vieira at the 2001 Daytime Emmy Awards, briefly departed from the show in 2013. STUART RAMSON, Associated Press Behar resumed her co-hosting post that she currently holds in 2015. Donna Svennevik, AP Meredith Vieira (with Jones), who also served as moderator, rounds out the original cast. STEVE FENN, ABC Seen with model/actress Elle MacPherson, left, in 1997, Vieira brought a refreshing candor to the show until her exit in 2006. STEVE FENN, ABC Since she has co-hosted the “Today” show and hosted “The Meredith Vieira Show,” which premiered in 2014 and ran for two seasons. Todd Plitt, USA TODAY Ling, left with Walters, occupied the space once filled by Matenopoulos, beginning in 1999. MARIA MELIN, ABC In Halloween costume with her then-co-hosts, from left Vieira, Behar, Jones and Walters, Ling, right, represented youths on the panel and once had her bellybutton pierced on-air. IDA MAE ASTUTE, ABC Ling left the show in 2002 to host “National Geographic Explorer.” Her current show, “This Is Life with Lisa Ling” premiered in 2014. Frederick M. Brown, Getty Images Ling was replaced by conservative “Survivor” castoff Elisabeth Hasselbeck, right with Walters. Eileen Blass, USA TODAY Hasselbeck’s views sometimes clashed with those of her co-host, Rosie O’Donnell (second from left, pictured with Walters and Behar). HEIDI GUTMAN, AP She left “The View” in 2013 for a gig with “Fox & Friends,” making her debut that fall. She exited the Fox News program in 2015 to be a full-time mom. Richard Drew, AP After Vieira vacated the moderator chair, Rosie O’Donnell was tapped to fill her shoes in 2006. She stayed for just one season. MARY ALTAFFER, AP O’Donnell, pictured in 2006 with Walters, Behar and Hasselbeck, rejoined the cast in 2014 but left again in 2015. That year, her spokeswoman Cindi Berger explained to People magazine, “She’s focused on her kids now.” MARY ALTAFFER, AP O’Donnell, pictured in New York in 2017, has continued appearing onscreen as an actress. Dia Dipasupil, Getty Images Following O’Donnell’s first exit, Whoopi Goldberg (pictured with Walters) was hired as “The View” moderator in 2007. STEVE FENN, AP The current co-host is pictured with, from left, Behar, guest actor Eddie Izzard, and co-host Sara Haines in June of 2017. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC While fulfilling her hosting duties, Goldberg has continued to act, write and produce. She also directed the 2013 documentary “Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin’ to Tell You.” ANGELA WEISS, AFP/Getty Images Also in 2007, Sherri Shepherd, second from right seen here with (from left) Goldberg, Walters, guest Tom Cruise, Behar and Hasselbeck, joined the women of “The View.” IDA MAE ASTUTE, AP After discussing hot topics for seven years, Shepherd (pictured with Walters) left the series In 2014. Robert Deutsch, USAT Shepherd seen in Atlanta in February 2017, recently played the role of Agent Beverly on “K.C. Undercover.” Paras Griffin, WireImage Comedian-actress Jenny McCarthy, far left, with Walters, O’Donnell, Shepherd and Goldberg, signed up to be a part of the cast in 2013. Lou Rocco, ABC During an April 2014 episode, Jenny McCarthy announced her engagement to now-husband Donnie Wahlberg. Heidi Gutman, AP McCarthy left “The View” later that year and currently hosts “Dirty, Sexy, Funny” on SiriusXM. Jeff Schear, Getty Images for SiriusXM Like McCarthy, Rosie Perez, second from right with, from left, Goldberg, then-co-host Nicolle Wallace, Taylor Swift and O’Donnell in 2014, also had a short tenure on the show. Lou Rocco, ABC Seen during an episode in 2015, Rosie Perez joined the all-female cast in 2014 and left the following year. Lou Rocco, ABC Perez, in New York in 2016, has since acted in “Search Party” and other roles. Jim Spellman, WireImage Wallace, far right, with Goldberg, Perez and O’Donnell, was also a “View” newbie the year Perez started. Yolanda Perez, ABC Like Perez, Wallace, seen with from left, Goldberg, D.L. Hughley, and her former co-host Michelle Collins, exited “The View” after one season. Lou Rocco, ABC Since 2017 she has hosted MSNBC’s “Deadline: White House.” Henry S. Dziekan III, WireImage Actress Raven-Symone, with Haines, took a position as a co-host in 2015. Lou Rocco, ABC Pictured with Sherri Shepherd in 2016, she announced she was leaving the program in Oct. of that year. Lou Rocco, ABC She resumed her ‘That’s So Raven’ character for 2017’s “Raven’s Home.” Bob D’Amico, Disney Channel Comedian Michelle Collins, with “Orange Is the New Black” actress Lea DeLaria, came aboard in 2015. Lou Rocco, ABC With Behar and director Quentin Tarantino during her inaugural year, Collins remained a co-host until the following summer. Lou Rocco, ABC She also co-hosted ABC’s “After Paradise,” the after show for “Bachelor in Paradise.” Richard Harbaugh, ABC In August of 2015, ABC announced actress Candace Cameron Bure (pictured) and “Good Morning America Weekend Edition” co-host Paula Faris would take a little time to join “The View.” Lou Rocco, ABC Celebrating her 40th Birthday on the show in April of 2016, Cameron Bure revealed her decision to exit that Dec. to devote more time to her family and acting obligations. Lou Rocco, ABC One of her acting gigs includes resuming her childhood role of D.J.Tanner for Netflix’s “Fuller House.” Michael Yarish/Netflix It was announced in July 2018 that Faris, who joined the show in 2015, would leave “The View”. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC The Michigan native poses with guest co-host Caitlyn Jenner in July of 2017. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC In a 2016 interview with The Hollywood Reporter Faris said crafting arguments for “The View” has made her “a better broadcaster.” “…I think I’m just more researched, I’m more read-in and I’m more ready for anything that comes my way,” she said. Heidi Gutman, ABC For the show’s 20th season, which premiered on Sept. 6, 2016, ABC News correspondent Sara Haines, with Raven-Symoné, joined the cast. Fred Lee, ABC Not afraid to get personal on the show, she shared pregnancy news on June 20, 2017, as Behar and co-host Jedediah Bila looked on. Paula Lobo, ABC ABC News announced in July 2018, Haines with Bila, would depart “The View” to co-host “GMA Day” with Michael Strahan. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC Current co-host Sunny Hostin officially joined the talk show in its 20th season. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC Hostin, with, from left, Goldberg, Chelsea Handler and Behar, also serves as ABC News’ senior legal correspondent. Jeff Neira , ABC According to her website, she has covered big legal cases including the George Zimmerman, Casey Anthony and Conrad Murray trials. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC Bila also officially joined ‘The View’ in Season 20. Heidi Gutman , ABC The former Fox News contributor greeted actor Luke Perry when he surprised her for her birthday in Jan. of 2017. Lou Rocco , ABC Bila, seen with her colleague Haines, announced on Sept. 18, 2017, that she was leaving ‘The View.’ Lorenzo Bevilaqua, ABC Meghan McCain, seen in 2015, joined ‘The View’ on Oct. 9, 2017. Charley Gallay, Getty Images for W Hollywood McCain, the daughter of Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain seen at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner in 2014, previously co-hosted Fox News’s ‘Outnumbered’. NICHOLAS KAMM, AFP/Getty Images Abby Huntsman joined “The View” as a co-host in the show’s 22nd season. Gustavo Caballero, Getty Images for Vivienne Tam Huntsman made her debut on Sept. 4, 2018, while co-host Meghan McCain was on leave following her father’s death. McCain returned the next month. Rob Kim, Getty Images for SiriusXM CNN commentator and Republican Strategist Ana Navarro also joined the cast in season 22 as a guest co-host to fill in for Goldberg on Fridays. She continued to act as Goldberg’s replacement in 2019 while the longtime moderator recovered from pneumonia. NBC NewsWire, NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images Replay Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide

In case any TV fans missed Elisabeth Hasselbeck and Rosie O’Donnell’s explosive on-air fight more than a decade ago, the two former View cohosts are dredging up their old drama now.

Hasselbeck, 41, and O’Donnell, 57, had disagreed over politics throughout the ABC talk show’s 10th season, but their conflict turned into a shouting match in May 2007 when O’Donnell accused the Survivor alum of not defending her against media pundits who interpreted O’Donnell’s anti-war criticisms as equating the U.S. troops to terrorists.

“Every day since September, I have told you that I support the troops,” the SMILF actress told her costar. “I asked you if you believed what the Republican pundits were saying. You said nothing, and that’s cowardly.”

Hasselbeck responded: “I just don’t understand why it’s my fault if people spin words that you put out there or phrases that suggest things. And I gave you an opportunity two days ago to clarify the statement that got you in trouble on all those things.”

After the argument, speculation mounted that O’Donnell would exit her original run on the show early, even though she was only a month away from her previously announced departure. On her blog, the Emmy winner seemed to confirm the speculation in a poem, writing: “It may be time to be done / endings r hard 4 all / emotions r high / talking is tough.”

Two days after the fight, ABC announced that O’Donnell had asked to be released from her contract. But her first abrupt exit was far from the end of her cold war with Hasselbeck. Scroll down to read more about their continuing feud.

Elisabeth Hasselbeck ‘Started Praying’ After Learning of Rosie O’Donnell’s ‘Disturbing’ Crush

Elisabeth Hasselbeck says she’s praying for former View cohost Rosie O’Donnell after hearing that the comedian once had “a little bit of a crush” on her.

The Survivor contestant turned political pundit appeared on Tuesday’s episode of Fox & Friends, where she opened up about O’Donnell’s remarks in Ramin Setoodeh’s upcoming book, Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of The View

“The truth is, what she said, if you took her words and replaced ‘Rosie’ for ‘Ronald,’ there would be an objectification of women in the workplace. So that is disturbing and it’s wrong,” Hasselbeck said. “Whether you’re a man or whether you’re a woman, and you’re objectifying women in the workplace, it’s wrong.”

Portions of O’Donnell’s interview were published Monday by Variety in an excerpt of Setoodeh’s book.

In them, O’Donnell balked at rumors that she and Hasselbeck were enemies on the ABC daytime show, explaining that she “loved” Hasselbeck and had “a little bit of a crush” on her. Though O’Donnell stressed the crush wasn’t sexual, she said there was “underlying lesbian tones on both parts,” pointing to Hasselbeck’s time as MVP of a Division 1 softball team.

“There are not many, in my life, girls with such athletic talent on sports teams that are traditionally male that aren’t at least a little bit gay,” O’Donnell said.

Image zoom Elisabeth Hasselback and Rosie O’Donnell Donna Svennevik/ABC via Getty Images; Fred Lee/ABC via Getty Images

Reading O’Donnell’s words upset Hasselbeck. To process her feelings, the mother of three said she turned to prayer.

“I’ll be very honest. I read it and I immediately started praying. Because I’m like, ‘How am I going to handle this?’ ” Hasselbeck said on Fox on Friends, explaining that she didn’t want to fight with O’Donnell as the two had infamously done on The View.

“In my old self, would be another split-screen moment. But now I really feel like by God’s grace, I just started praying — and I pray now the Holy Spirit gives me the words to articulate this — but I think it can be addressed with both truth and grace.”

Hasselbeck said she attempted to called O’Donnell directly to discuss her comments, but she didn’t have an updated number for the star.

She told Fox & Friends that she hopes to explain to O’Donnell how the words hurt her, and how “casting a stereotype on female athletes…. that all female athletes are a little bit gay” was “an unfair stereotype and it seems selfish in a way and I think that it’s untrue.”

RELATED: From Rosie O’Donnell to Star Jones, The View‘s Most Dramatic Exits

Ultimately, Hasselbeck said she is in a positive place in life and forgives O’Donnell.

“I can handle that with the grace of God because I need grace and I need forgiveness. So Rosie, I think it was disturbing to read those things and it was offensive to me, but I forgive her. I totally forgive you, Rosie,” Hasselbeck said. “I really hope that we can be at peace and that we can both hold our beliefs in one hand and hold each other’s hand in the other and still have a relationship that’s at peace.”

“But, more than that, just like I would pray for my friends, I hope that she has the peace of God,” Hasselbeck added. “Because… Rosie O’Donnell is still seen and known and loved by God, and I hope that she feels that and I hope that she can find, ultimately, the peace. Even more than I want to be at peace with her, I hope she finds that peace because God wants that for her too.”

Image zoom Elisabeth Hasselbeck and Rosie O’Donnell Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images

O’Donnell first joined The View in 2006, and left the show in May 2007 — one month before she had been scheduled to leave when her contract expired — after an explosive on-air confrontation with Hasselbeck about the Iraq War.

The mother of five told Setoodeh in the book that while she was hurt by the argument, she was mostly pained that Hasselbeck didn’t defend her when it came to conservative critics.

“It felt like a lover breaking up,” O’Donnell stated in Variety‘s excerpt about her last day on the show with Hasselbeck. “The fight that we had, to me as a gay woman, it felt like this: ‘You don’t love me as much as I love you.’ ‘I’ve taken care of you.’ ‘You have not.’ ‘How could you do that to me?’ ‘I didn’t do anything to you.’ “

Throughout their time together on The View, O’Donnell said she saw herself as a mentor of sorts to Hasselbeck. “I wanted to support, raise, elevate her, like she was the freshman star shortstop and I was the captain of the team,” O’Donnell said. “I was going to Scottie Pippen her. If I was Jordan, I was going to give her the ball and let her shoot… ‘I’m the senior. She’s the freshman. I’ve got a really good player on the freshman team, but I have to teach her how to loosen up.’ “

Image zoom Rosie’ O’Donnell and Elisabeth Hasselbeck, reuniting with all 11 co-hosts of ABC’s The View in 2014 Lou Rocco/ABC via Getty Images

Hasselbeck, who served as the conservative voice on the panel, left The View in July 2013 for Fox & Friends.

O’Donnell later rejoined the show,but departed once again in February 2015.

Meanwhile, Hasselbeck has her own new book out about her time on The View, out Tuesday. Titled Point of View: A Fresh Look at Work, Faith, and Freedom, it presents “a deeply intimate journey of faith, told through the important moments in her life,” according to its description.

  • By Dave Quinn @NineDaves

Inside Rosie O’Donnell’s Dramatic Exit From ‘The View’ (Exclusive)

When Rosie O’Donnell made her triumphant return to “The View” in September, she promised a calmer version of the host who previously fled the program in 2007 after a single season.

But O’Donnell’s unhappiness at “” led her to announce on Friday, via a story in the New York Post’s Page Six section, that she was exiting the show after five months. ABC executives agreed to release her early from a 11-month contract, estimated to be worth $5 million.

In a brief interview with “Entertainment Tonight” over the weekend, O’Donnell attributed her departure to a desire to focus on her family after divorcing with wife Michelle Rounds, whom she married in 2012, and whose first initial she tattooed on her wedding-ring finger. But insiders say that the end of her second marriage, which she candidly talked about with “The View’s” staff, isn’t the only reason she’s leaving.

O’Donnell, who has a reputation as a demanding and sometimes abrasive boss, didn’t feel like her strengths were being properly used by , according to those close to the 52-year-old comedian. Compounding the problem were tensions with co-host Whoopi Goldberg and behind-the-scenes executive turmoil at “The View,” which recently shifted to management under ABC News.

In a pressure-filled environment, O’Donnell fell into some of the same traps that she faced the last time she was on “The View,” when she refused to wear a earpiece on camera and openly battled with then-exec producer Bill Geddie. On the other hand, she wasn’t able to catalyze the same buzz and ratings growth as she did before.

During her first stint on the show, O’Donnell had served as “The View’s” moderator, but that job now belongs to Goldberg. Insiders say this turned out to be a source of frustration for O’Donnell, as she felt Goldberg was dismissive of opposing viewpoints during some of the show’s key debates. For example, O’Donnell didn’t like what she saw as Goldberg’s refusal to let the co-hosts have a candid discussion about one of the most explosive topics of the past few months: the allegations of rape levied at Bill Cosby by more than two dozen women.

The working relationship between O’Donnell and Goldberg became even more strained as a result of the show’s morning meetings. “The View” staff typically congregated at 9 a.m. each day to brainstorm for the “Hot Topics” segment. O’Donnell didn’t think this gave them enough time to prepare for an 11 a.m. live show, so the meetings were moved to 8:30 a.m.

But the earlier time meant that Goldberg (who commutes into the city each morning from New Jersey) would sometimes arrive a few minutes late. This irked O’Donnell, who interpreted Goldberg’s occasional tardiness as a sign that she wasn’t committed to the job. The meetings eventually moved back to 9 a.m.

During her previous ’06-’07 tenure, which was certainly rocky, O’Donnell increased viewership and made the show relevant again. This year, “The View” has plummeted 9% in its target demo of women 25-54, sometimes even losing the demo race to CBS’ upstart rival, “The Talk.”

The disappointing numbers could be a result of O’Donnell’s different persona on “The View,” where she isn’t as political as the outspoken liberal who once used to trash George W. Bush’s policies and offer Sept. 11 conspiracy theories. The daytime TV star looked uncomfortable and tentative at the “Hot Topics” table this season, and recused herself from long stretches of conversation. ABC executives would often ask O’Donnell to look happier on air, a note that the comedian didn’t appreciate, according to sources.

While O’Donnell remains a skilled interviewer, it’s also clear that she isn’t as attuned to pop culture as she used to be. In 2011, she had a short-lived talk show on OWN and, by many accounts, drove her staff crazy by berating them and constantly changing the format — veering from light celebrity interviews to games with the audience.

But following a near fatal heart attack in 2012, O’Donnell has become even more serious about social issues. During “Hot Topics,” she’d often chime in to plug one of her favorite documentaries, and asked that the show book guests like “Vagina Monologues” writer Eve Ensler and the parents of Matthew Shepard.

These more hard-hitting segments didn’t rate with the daytime audience, which prefers light fare such as discussions about Justin Bieber, “Dancing With the Stars” and “The Bachelor” (a show that O’Donnell doesn’t watch).

Staffers say there weren’t as many backstage fights as there were during O’Donnell’s previous tenure on the show — which included the fallout from O’Donnell mocking Donald Trump’s hair, and creator-exec producer Barbara Walters getting caught in that public feud, as well as a spectacular shouting match with ex-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck on her final day. But the off-stage interactions between O’Donnell and the ABC staff were often cold. “She shut down completely,” one employee says.

O’Donnell didn’t gel much with the staff, and she once singled out certain people in a meeting and accused them of leaking information about her in the press. And she constantly talked about how she had made a mistake in agreeing to return to “The View,” and threatened to quit on several occasions.

There may not have been a single event that let to O’Donnell’s decision to leave “The View,” although her mood slightly improved in January when Goldberg was sidelined for two weeks due to a back injury. (Rosie Perez was also absent, rehearsing for a Broadway play.)

O’Donnell then took over as moderator, and started to channel her old personality. She cracked one-liners, improvised from the TelePrompTer and was happy to steer the show her own way, according to sources. But she was disappointed that ratings for “The View” dipped with her in charge, a decline that could also be the result of a rotating panel of B-list guest co-hosts.

See More: Rosie O’Donnell Returns to ‘The View’ Healthier and Happier

O’Donnell’s brief return to “The View” has coincided with a period of upheaval at the network. Her hiring at “The View” was one of the last acts by Anne Sweeney, who stepped down as president of Disney/ABC Television Group last month after 10 years at the helm. In addition, insiders say “The View” these days often feels like a rudderless ship without Walters, who retired last May.

O’Donnell was disheartened that she couldn’t steer “The View” in the right direction, and that her ideas weren’t being heard. O’Donnell was accustomed to being in charge as she was during her six-season run on “The Rosie O’Donnell Show,” which ran in syndication from 1996-2002. She’d frequently cite her previous TV experience and awards in meetings as proof that other staffers should listen to her.

But as the 18th season of “The View” started to come together over the summer, incoming ABC president Ben Sherwood — who officially started his job this month — wanted his ABC News team to oversee the show’s post-Walters makeover instead of ABC’s daytime executives. ABC News and the daytime execs on the entertainment side engaged in a tug of war over the show until Sherwood mandated that it move to the news side.

The inhouse bickering over “The View” meant that important decisions, like casting the new co-hosts that would join O’Donnell and Goldberg, became frantic, eleventh-hour decisions. ABC finally settled on Republican strategist Nicolle Wallace and Perez just weeks before the first live airing, as new exec producer and showrunner Bill Wolff was cobbling together a revamped set without communicating with any of the co-hosts.

“The View” premiered to 3.9 million viewers in September—an eight-year record that proved stay-at home moms and dads were eager to see O’Donnell back on the show—but then the numbers quickly dropped.

In October, following the disappointing launch, ABC News officially inherited control of “The View” as part of Sherwood’s plan, but the show’s staff is still largely comprised of daytime employees who resent the new hierarchical structure.

“The View” is now being micro-managed by five executives under the direction of ABC News president James Goldston. Sources have expressed frustration that seemingly mundane decisions are filtered through an exec gantlet that includes Tom Cibrowski, senior VP of programs; Barbara Fedida, senior VP for talent and business; David Sloan, a senior executive producer at “20/20”; Randall Barone, VP of daytime programming; and Wolff, a former “Rachel Maddow” producer, who sources say doesn’t exercise much control and seems lost in the daytime zone.

Last week, “View” co-exec producer Brian Balthazar announced he was leaving to take on a job as VP of programming at HGTV. “There are way too many cooks,” says one staffer.

Sources say that some of O’Donnell’s expectations could have been managed if the reshuffling to ABC News hadn’t produced such a chaotic work environment. But the new organizational structure put into effect by Sherwood has made morale at “The View” low. On Jan. 14, Variety broke the news that ABC executives had reached a decision to fire Perez and replace her with a younger co-host. But once the plan was made public, ABC backtracked amid a backlash from O’Donnell and the other co-hosts who weren’t aware of the plan.

Perez returned to the show last week from her previously scheduled monthlong hiatus to rehearse for Larry David’s play “Fish in the Dark.” ABC execs strongly deny that there was ever a plan in place to remove Perez. But Perez’s return to “The View” was deemed awkward by some, despite Goldberg announcing on TV that the show’s four co-hosts were there to stay for good. A few days later, O’Donnell had enough — and she bailed on “The View.”

Whoopi Goldberg has been getting a bad rep as of late as Rosie O’Donnell and Jenny McCarthy, two of her former colleagues on The View, have talked about her alleged not-so-kind behavior behind-the-scenes.

Goldberg, 63, has been a co-host on The View since 2007. During her month-long absence from the daytime talk show amid a pneumonia battle, her missing presence was very apparent as co-host Joy Behar had to take on Goldberg’s moderator role. Many fans sent the Academy Award winner well wishes via social media during her time away, which she acknowledged March 8 as she thanked them for “all of the wonderful things that people have been saying.”

O’Donnell, 57, worked on The View twice during a seven-year period. When she returned to the show for Season 18 in 2014, Goldberg was allegedly not very nice. O’Donnell detailed her negative experience with Goldberg in author Ramin Setoodeh’s upcoming tell-all book Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of ‘The View,’ out April 2.

O’Donnell explained to Setoodeh how Goldberg compares to others working in television, saying: “Whoopi Goldberg was as mean as anyone has ever been on television to me, personally—while I was sitting there. Worse than Fox News. The worst experience I’ve ever had on live television was interacting with her.”

US actress Whoopi Goldberg is pictured attending the New York premiere of ‘Nobody’s Fool’ at AMC Lincoln Square Theater on October 28, 2018, in New York City. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

McCarthy, 46, spoke also about her experience working on The View with Goldberg in Setoodeh’s Ladies Who Punch. The Playboy alum, who worked on the ABC show from 2013 to 2014, said she “thought I was going to work with the Whoopi that people thought they might know” but she alleged to having “miserable” time working on the show.

“Whoopi can knock over anyone in a debate,” said McCarthy, according to Vulture. “Her voice is strong not only in meaning but also in sound. I was able to get a point out in three words—like ‘I don’t agree’—and that’s all I would be able to say. I would be stepped on or interrupted.”

Added McCarthy: “To me, Whoopi had an addiction to controlling people’s thoughts, their words, the room, the table, your feeling, your mood. She had an addiction to controlling all of it and everybody.”

While O’Donnell and McCarthy had negative feedback regarding their experience with Goldberg, former The View co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck spoke positively about her time working with The Color Purple actress. She described her working relationship with Goldberg in her new book, Point of View.

“Whoopi and I each think the other one is downright crazy when it comes to our stance on any given issue,” Hasselbeck wrote, according to The Tennessean. “And we love each other for who the other is instead of hating each other for what we each stand for.”

Representatives for The View declined to comment.

Whoopi Goldberg Shares Her Very Real Take on The View Book and Rosie O’Donnell’s Revelations

We’ve heard quite a bit about the juicy new book Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of “The View,” which details the behind-the-scenes action from years of The View. Among the more shocking revelations from co-hosts past and present was an admission from Rosie O’Donnell that she used to have a crush on her former colleague Elisabeth Hasselbeck — and an allegation that Hasselbeck is “a little bit gay.”

O’Donnell also told the book’s author that Whoopi Goldberg was: “as mean as anyone has ever been on television to me, personally — while I was sitting there. Worse than Fox News. The worst experience I’ve ever had on live television was interacting with her.”

So, when Goldberg appeared on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen, a caller was naturally curious to hear how the Ghost actress felt about the tell-all, and her reaction to what O’Donnell had said about her.

In the clip above, Goldberg said that she had not read the book. “I didn’t talk to the guy; I didn’t care about the book,” she said. “What happens for me at work is not for everybody — it’s not their business! I don’t like talking out of school and I don’t like other people talking out of school. So for me, you just have to leave it there.”

As for O’Donnell’s comments about her, Goldberg, well, left it there. “That’s OK,” was her short and sweet response. Watch the clip above to hear her share her feelings on the book.

By the way, Jenny McCarthy also kept it real in her quotes for the book, telling the author that her experience on the show was “miserable.” (Ask Jenny about that time Barbara Walters allegedly accused her of leaving a tampon in the backstage toilet. Yikes.)