George w bush inauguration cake

On its Instagram account, the bakeshop wrote: “This year’s committee commissioned us to re-create it.”

“While we most love creating original designs, when we are asked to replicate someone else’s work we are thrilled when it is a masterpiece like this one,” the bakery wrote.

The inaugural cake quickly became a punch line on Twitter, a mock controversy with the hashtag #cakegate. And it was another intellectual property mishap, however small, connected to Mr. Trump. Earlier that day, Mr. Trump’s takeover of the @POTUS Twitter account included a stock image from Mr. Obama’s first inauguration that was used as its background.

The inauguration committee did not respond to an immediate request for comment.

A spokeswoman for Tiffany MacIsaac, the owner of Buttercream Bakeshop, said that some of the planners for the Armed Services ball approached the shop with a picture of the cake Mr. Goldman had made. The cake was largely for show, the spokeswoman said; it was made mostly of plastic foam, except for a portion at the bottom.

Washington D.C. bakery comments on Trump inauguration cake controversy

AP Photo/David J. Phillip

This article originally appeared on PEOPLE.com.

If President Donald Trump‘s inauguration cake looked familiar, it may be because it had some striking similarities to former President Barack Obama‘s inauguration cake in 2013.

Duff Goldman, the celebrity baker whose Baltimore shop Charm City Cakes is the subject of the Food Network’s hit reality television show Ace of Cakes and the man who baked Obama’s 2013 cake, noted the alleged pastry plagiarism, sharing a shocking side-by-side photo to his social media accounts Friday evening.

“The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago,” Goldman explained in the caption to the photo. “The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it.”

The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago. The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it. 🤔 pic.twitter.com/qJXpCfPhii

— Duff Goldman (@duffgoldman) January 21, 2017

Both are nine-tier creations with red and white stripped bases. Then each move to layers with white leafs, patriotic banners, and the presidential seal.

The towering layers above look identical too, down to the color of each part’s fondant and decor. Both are topped with white stars attached to sticks, bursting from the top of two navy tiers.

On Saturday, Washington D.C.-based bakery Buttercream Bake Shop claimed that they had created the cake and that they had been specifically asked to copy Obama’s confection.

“Excited to share the cake we got to make for one of last night’s inaugural balls,” the bakery announced on Instagram. “While we most love creating original designs, when we are asked to replicate someone else’s work we are thrilled when it is a masterpiece like this one. @duff_goldman originally created this for Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago and this years committee commissioned us to re-create it.

“Best part is all the profits are being donated to @humanrightscampaign, one of our favorite charities who we have loved working with over the years,” the bakery continued. “Because basic human rights are something every man, woman and child~ straight, gay or the rainbow in between~ deserve!”

Charm City Cakes Owner Says Trump Copied Obama’s Inauguration Cake

Rose tells us that, though the committee had certain elements that they wanted to be included on the cake, she was free to create her own design: “I made sure it wasn’t too whimsical or silly,” she says with a laugh. “It was as respectful as a cake can be.”

When Rose was first made aware of the imitation, she was in D.C. for the Women’s March. She says that, after she saw it, she had to do a quick Google search to refresh her memory of what her cake looked like.

“When I was watching the inauguration coverage and saw the cake I was like ‘Wow that looks so much like the cake we made,’” she says.“And then I thought, ‘Wait a minute, is it the cake we made?’”

Though it was a shock, Rose says that she felt more surprised by the situation than outraged: “I was pretty blown away, but at the same time, I was there to march,” she says. “It felt kind of small to me. I knew it wasn’t Trump himself who was like, ‘Get me that cake and copy it exactly.’”

The replica—which features precisely the same details—was created by Tiffany MacIsaac, owner of Buttercream Bakeshop in Washington, D.C.

“Excited to share the cake we got to make for one of last night’s inaugural balls,” MacIsaac captioned a photo of the cake on Instagram Saturday. “While we mostly love creating original designs, when we are asked to replicate someone else’s work, we are thrilled when it is a masterpiece like this one.”

In an interview with The Washington Post, MacIsaac explained that when Trump’s team placed the order, they insisted that the cake look identical to its predecessor.

“They came to us a couple of weeks ago, which is pretty last minute, and said, ‘We have a photo that we would like to replicate,’” she told The Post. When encouraging the client to use the photo as inspiration, “They said, ‘Nope, they want this exact cake. It’s perfect.’ And we said, ‘Great.’”

Though she declined to mention her political affiliation, MacIsaac said that she prides herself on being non-discriminatory.

“I’m a small-business owner, and one of the things I’m very, very proud about is that I don’t discriminate,” she said. “I would never turn someone away based on their age, their sex, their sexual orientation, their political views. It’s just not the way we operate.”

In keeping with that sentiment, Buttercream Bakeshop donated $1200 of the cake’s proceeds to the Human Rights Campaign, a nonprofit that works to bring equality to the LGBTQ community.

After hearing MacIsaac’s perspective, Goldman took to Twitter to clear the air, declaring that: “cake decorators borrow and are inspired by each other all the time. It’s how we keep this industry fresh, relevant, and moving forward.”

Rose, too, is choosing to take the high road: “I think maybe the person who asked didn’t actually realize it would be such a big deal,” she says. “I imagine people out there don’t realize that you shouldn’t steal somebody else’s designs. Maybe because it’s a cake it’s seen as a less-respected art? Maybe they just don’t see that a line was crossed.”

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, after all.

Original, January 21, 2017, 9 a.m.: Duff Goldman has been whipping up insane cakes on Food Network and running his own very popular Baltimore bake shop, Charm City Cakes, for years — so it’s no surprise he was tapped by event planners to create a towering masterpiece for former President Barack Obama’s 2013 inaugural celebrations.

Well, fast forward four years, and it looks like that elaborate confection got another moment in the presidential spotlight — except this time Goldman didn’t make it.

The Food Network chef took to Twitter on Friday night to share a photo of his original nine-tiered, patriotic creation next to a photo of a cake President Donald Trump sliced into with a saber at last night’s Armed Services Ball. He also added a healthy dose of shade.

Goldman wrote: “The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago. The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it.”

The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago. The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it. 🤔 pic.twitter.com/qJXpCfPhii

— Duff Goldman (@duffgoldman) January 21, 2017

It’s hard to deny the similarities, right down to the number of layers, color palette and icing details. Both cakes appear to show off the presidential seal and other decorative elements, such as emblems for all the branches of the armed forces, that seem to be exact replicas.

Getty Images

There’s no information yet or comment from the evening’s event planners around the inspiration for the cake. Some Twitter users are speculating that the people behind this year’s cake may be the same ones who helped set up celebrations four years before and are giving planners the benefit of the doubt: When you land on a winning concept, why change it? Others wonder if perhaps there’s a design formula the cake has always followed. (Editor’s note: We’re looking for example photos of cakes from previous inaugurations, such as President George W. Bush, to see if they follow a similar pattern.)

Of course, these cake claims come half a year after critics went after First Lady Melania Trump for plagiarizing segments in her 2016 Republican Convention remarks from a previous speech by former First Lady Michelle Obama.

And the internet was having a field day yesterday joking that Trump lifted lines from a speech by Batman villain Bane for his inaugural address. So, more fodder for the copycat grist mill.

Update, January, 21, 2017, 11:50 a.m.: On Instagram, Buttercream Bakeshop posted a response to comments that they replicated Food Network chef Duff Goldman’s 2013 inaugural cake for former President Barack Obama. “While we most love creating original designs, when we are asked to replicate someone else’s work we are thrilled when it is a masterpiece like this one,” the post says. See the full version below:

Kristine Brabson Site Director Kristine can be summed up in a few short descriptors: animal lover, neat freak, book worm, workaholic, and romance novel obsessive.

Inauguration Facts

  • 1789 – A presidential inauguration has taken place every four years since George Washington took the oath of office in New York City in 1789. He established the tradition for a two term limit. This tradition was followed by subsequent presidents until President Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected four times.
  • 1801 – Starting with Thomas Jefferson in 1801, every presidential inauguration has taken place in Washington, D.C. This ceremony involves all three branches of government in the peaceful transfer of power from one president, and often political party, to the next.
  • 1829 – Early inaugurations in Washington, D.C. were held inside the U.S. Capitol. The first inauguration to take place on the East Front steps was for Andrew Jackson in 1829.
  • 1841 – In 1841, William Henry Harrison interrupted his inaugural address to take the oath of office before finishing his speech on a cold inauguration day. One month later, President Harrison passed away and John Tyler became the first vice president to assume the office of the president upon the death or resignation of the previous chief executive. Since Tyler, eight more vice presidents have completed the terms of former presidents: John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Chester Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Harry S. Truman, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Gerald Ford.
  • 1853 – In 1853, Franklin Pierce became the only president to “affirm” rather than “swear” his oath of office, as permitted in the Constitution, after which he delivered his address from memory.
  • 1857 – James Buchanan’s inauguration was the first to be photographed.
  • 1865 – At most of the early inaugurations, the president-elect delivered his inaugural address before taking the oath of office. Since 1865, every president, except James Garfield in 1881, has taken the oath first and then delivered his address as president.
  • 1865 – Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous second inaugural address on March 4, 1865 near the end of the Civil War: “With malice towards none, and charity for all. . . to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace.”
  • 1877 – After the highly contested 1876 election results, the Compromise of 1877 designated Rutherford B. Hayes the next president. Inauguration Day, however, fell on a Sunday. President Grant, also concerned by the potential for political unrest, decided on a private inauguration ceremony for his successor. Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite swore Hayes into office inside the White House’s Red Room. After the public inauguration at the Capitol on March 5, First Lady Julia Grant hosted a lunch at the White House in the flower-filled State Dining Room. Saddened at having to leave the residence after the luncheon, she later recalled, “How pretty the house was . . . Flowers on the tables, the sunlight falling through the lace curtains; how sweet it looked.”
  • 1889 and 1897 – Grover Cleveland was the first to attend two inaugurations as outgoing president.
  • 1897 – William McKinley’s inauguration was the first to be recorded on film and gramophone record.
  • 1925 – Calvin Coolidge’s inauguration was the first to be broadcast by radio. The oath of office was administered to Calvin Coolidge by Chief Justice and former president William Howard Taft. Taft performed this role again for President Herbert Hoover in 1929.
  • 1929 – Herbert Hoover’s inauguration was the first with a sound news reel.
  • 1937 – Inauguration day was held on March 4 until 1937, when the 20th Amendment changed the date to January 20.
  • 1945 – In 1945, because of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s ill health and the ongoing war effort, his fourth inauguration was held on the South Portico of the White House, with guests standing on the snow-covered South Lawn and additional onlookers on the Ellipse. Following Roosevelt’s death, Harry S. Truman took the oath of office in the Cabinet Room of the West Wing on April 12, 1945.
  • 1949 – Harry S. Truman’s inauguration was the first to be broadcast by television.
  • 1951 – The 22nd Amendment, ratified in 1951, states that no president can be elected to that role more than twice.
  • 1963 – Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as president on Air Force One after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. Johnson was one of three presidents to have taken the oath of office in their home states. The others were Theodore Roosevelt, who took the oath of office in New York following the assassination of President William McKinley, and Calvin Coolidge who did so in Vermont following the death of President Warren G. Harding.
  • 1981 – Since 1981, the inaugural stand has been set up on the West Front of the Capitol Building. This change provides for an improved panorama of the National Mall and more space for viewers.
  • 2001 – January 20, 2001 marked the first time a former president was present at the inauguration of their son when President George H. W. Bush witnessed the swearing in of President George W. Bush.

Former first lady Nancy Reagan toasts Ronald Reagan on Inauguration Day in 1985.AP Photo/John Duricka

President Donald Trump famously munched on KFC chicken, McDonald’s hamburgers, and taco bowls during his campaign, and he picked a fast-food mogul as his labor secretary. But when it came time for his first day in office, Trump dined on haute cuisine. The three-course inaugural luncheon included Maine lobster, Angus beef, and chocolate soufflé, all washed down with California wines. You can see the full menu here.

While it comes as no surprise that a new leader’s luncheon would include such fancy fare, that doesn’t mean every president has dined in such luxury—Roosevelt faced butterless rolls at the first lunch of his fourth term, which occurred during the stark days of World War II. Here’s a quick journey through some of our past presidents’ inaugural meals:

1865: Abraham Lincoln’s midnight inaugural buffet serves foie gras, turtle stew, and leg of veal. Too bad a rowdy, drunken mob use it to start a food fight.

1889: After a meal of oysters, cold tongue, and quail, Benjamin Harrison and his guests are presented with a cake replica of the Capitol building, measuring six feet tall and weighing 800 pounds.

1945: In the interest of wartime rationing, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s housekeeper, Henrietta Nesbitt, serves guests cold chicken salad, rolls without butter, coffee with no sugar, and cake with no frosting at the president’s fourth inauguration.

1957: In the short-lived tradition of “minorities dinners,” Dwight D. Eisenhower’s staff serves Greek salad and gefilte fish at the president’s second inauguration.

1977: Jimmy Carter cancels his inaugural meal so he can be the first to walk from the Capitol to the White House in the parade after being sworn in. In lieu of a lavish luncheon, his guests munch on peanuts and pretzels.

1981: Ronald Reagan relied on jelly beans to quit smoking, so for his inaugural festivities, Herman Goelitz Candy Company of Oakland, California, sends three and a half tons of cherry, coconut, and blueberry Jelly Bellies to the White House.

Former first lady Nancy Reagan toasts Ronald Regan on Inauguration Day in 1985. AP Photo/John Duricka

1993: Transition aide Richard Mintz calls the American menu at Bill Clinton’s inauguration a “cross between a Crittenden County coon supper and a formal state dinner.”

2005: George W. Bush starts his second inaugural meal with a prayer and finishes it with a steamed lemon pudding, one of Teddy Roosevelt’s favorite desserts.

George W. Bush and former first lady Laura Bush bow their heads in prayer after being sworn in. AP Photo/Dennis Cook

2009: In honor of Abraham Lincoln’s bicentennial birthday, Barack Obama chooses a menu inspired by the 16th president’s favorite foods: pheasant, duck, and caramel apple cake.

Barack Obama toasts Joe Biden with “Special Inaugural Cuvée.” Obama White House/Flickr

Cake-Gate: Controversy Over Inaugural Cake Gets New Layer

BALTIMORE, MD — Baltimore baker and Food Network star Duff Goldman spotted a knockoff of one of his designs recently — at the inauguration of President Donald J. Trump. After tweeting about it, he discovered that copying his cake was the intent, and the creators were using the proceeds to help the LGBTQ community.

Upon seeing the red, white and blue layer cake at Friday’s military ball, one of the inaugural festivities, Goldman tweeted pictures showing the Trump cake juxtaposed with the one he was commissioned to create at the inauguration for former President Barack Obama in 2013.

Goldman, owner of Baltimore’s Charm City Cakes, is best known for showcasing his culinary skills on “Ace of Cakes” and has recently been judging the “Kids Baking Championship” for the Food Network as well. Between working and filming in Maryland and California, Goldman spotted his cake design on the inaugural table.

The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago. The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it. pic.twitter.com/qJXpCfPhii
— Duff Goldman (@Duff_Goldman) January 21, 2017

It turned out that D.C.’s Buttercream Bake Shop was commissioned to make the cake to look like Goldman’s. In fact, Buttercream Bake Shop owner Tiffany MacIsaac told the Washington Post that someone came into her shop a few weeks ago with a photograph of the 2013 cake and asked for an exact replica. The rub: Most of the cake was for show at this week’s affair; only the bottom piece was edible, according to the Post.

The D.C. bakery announced Tuesday that it donated $1,200 from its cake gig to the Human Rights Campaign, controversial since the organization promotes civil rights, in particular advocating for the LGBTQ community; Vice President Mike Pence has over the years tried to restrict the freedoms of homosexuals.

“Best part is all the profits are being donated to @humanrightscampaign, one of our favorite charities who we have loved working with over the years. Because basic human rights are something every man, woman and child~ straight, gay or the rainbow in between~ deserve!” Buttercream Bake Shop said Tuesday.

The bakery reported it has given time and resources to the Human Rights Campaign over the years.

Ultimately, the “cake-gate controversy” brought the leaders of both Charm City Cakes and Buttercream Bake Shop together, with Goldman inviting his D.C. baker friends to visit his shop in Remington.

Anytime, @BttrcrmBakeshop! You guys made a beautiful cake! Come by @Charm_CityCakes if you’re ever in Baltimore! https://t.co/ou8hR1I3og
— Duff Goldman (@Duff_Goldman) January 22, 2017

There was no word if the flavors from Buttercream’s cake (the bottom layer) were similar to the Charm City version, which had Swiss buttercream layers between pineapple, pumpkin chocolate chip, lemon poppy seed and red velvet cake, according to Bon Appetit. In an interview with the magazine at the time, Goldman said he was given those flavor selections by the event’s planners and had also made a cake for the State Department and Hillary Clinton when she was first lady.

After learning the inaugural ball was intended to recognize the military, Goldman sent a dozen sketches to the event planners to try to get the cake just right, he told Bon Appetit. After much collaboration and feedback, he came up with the multi-tiered design with seals for all branches of the military.

Main image via the White House

While watching the Inauguration proceedings on Friday, Ace of Cakes star Duff Goldman noticed something odd about Donald Trump’s celebratory dessert: it looks exactly like the one he made for Barack Obama’s inauguration four years ago.

It appears to be the same cake, down to the seal, stripes on the bottom layer, and little shooting stars stuck into the top.

Apparently, the bakery that created Trump’s cake, Buttercream Bakeshop, offered to create an original design but instead were commissioned for a copy. They shared their own photo of the design on their Instagram, saying, “While we most love creating original designs, when we are asked to replicate someone else’s work we are thrilled when it is a masterpiece like this one.” At least they credit Goldman in their post.

When Eater contacted the company, baker Tiffany MacIsaac reiterated that they were “commissioned to make a replica.” But by Goldman’s tweet from Friday, it seems like they didn’t contact him to let him know they were using his design.

So, what exactly does the cake incident say about Trump’s organizational team that they wanted a cake that didn’t just have the same vibe as Obama’s, but was exactly the same one? Were they hoping that no one would remember it? Unlikely. Were they making some kind of equivalency statement, that Trump’s presidency would be the same as Obama’s? We already know that’s not the case.

One thing is for certain, though: Trump and cakes just don’t seem to mix.

Update (4:15 P.M.): In an interview with the Washington Post on Saturday, MacIsaac gave more detail on the cake. The bulk of it, she said, was not edible. “It’s just a Stryofoam cake. It’s not for eating,” she told the paper. “I wasn’t expecting it to be seen on TV.” MacIssac plans to donate the proceeds from the cake to the Human Rights Campaign.

Correction (4:35 P.M.): When we first published this story, it misidentified the name of the bakery that made the cake for Trump’s inauguration. It is Buttercream Bakeshop.

Donald Trump’s inaugural cake wasn’t just a copy of Obama’s—it was also fake

There’s only one thing worse than a plagiarized cake design: A fake cake.

As newly elected President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence sliced into their cake at the “Salute to Our Troops” Inauguration Ball Friday night, the nine-tier cake looked oddly familiar to some, including the baker of Barack Obama’s cake four years ago.

The baker, Duff Goldman, tweeted photos of both cakes which showed that they were identical—right down to the stars and stripes.

The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago. The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it. 🤔 pic.twitter.com/qJXpCfPhii

— Duff Goldman (@duffgoldman) January 21, 2017

While Trump’s transition and inauguration teams have not responded to comments about the identical cakes, Tiffany MacIsaac, owner of Washington’s Buttercream Bakeshop, told the Washington Post she made the cake.

MacIsaac said a client commissioned her to recreate an exact replica of the cake from Obama’s second inauguration. She also said she hadn’t expected the cake to get any attention because it was intended to be a prop. The cake was entirely made of Styrofoam except for a three-inch slice at the bottom.

The bakeshop shared a photo of the cake on its Instagram account, giving credit to Goldman for the original design. It also shared what it intends to do with the profits it made from the commission.

“Best part is all the profits are being donated to @humanrightscampaign, one of our favorite charities who we have loved working with over the years,” they wrote. “Because basic human rights are something every man, woman and child~ straight, gay or the rainbow in between~ deserve!”

Goldman appears to not hold any grudges against the bakeshop, MacIsaac, or Trump.

Not everyone has been as forgiving, however. Twitter users rallied behind Goldman, saying the replica was plagiarism.

@Duff_Goldman nah son. They stole from you. Stop trying to be nice. Trump and “fantastic” belong nowhere in the same sentence.

— XCrossAtlanticX (@XcrossAtlanticX) January 21, 2017

@Duff_Goldman Don’t back track. They stole from you. You have the right to be upset about that!

— Veronica (@AllInGoodThyme) January 21, 2017

The inauguration cake wasn’t the only part of the day to be accused of plagiarism. Many also pointed out similarities between Trump’s inauguration speech and a line from Batman villain Bane in The Dark Knight Rises.

First lady Melania Trump watches as President Donald J. Trump, and Vice President Mike Pence, right,are helped by Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Babot, center, as they cut a cake at The Salute To Our Armed Services Inaugural Ball Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington. Karen Pence watches at right. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Did President Donald Trump’s inaugural party committee purposely commission a cake to look exactly like former President Barack Obama’s from his 2013 celebrations?

According to the baker behind Trump’s confection, yes.

Controversy erupted over the weekend when “Ace of Cakes” star Duff Goldman tweeted out a picture featuring the newly sworn-in president slicing into a nine-tier cake at the “Salute Our Armed Services” ball next to a photo of the confection the Food Network star created for Obama at his “Commander-in-Chief” ball four years ago.

The cakes– which both feature stars, stripes, red, white and blue and plenty of Americana– looked strikingly similar.

“The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago,” Goldman tweeted early Saturday morning. “The one on the right is Trump’s. I didn’t make it.”

The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago. The one on the right is Trumps. I didn’t make it. 🤔 pic.twitter.com/qJXpCfPhii

— Duff Goldman (@Duff_Goldman) January 21, 2017

Social media erupted with calls of cake “plagarism” with many noting this isn’t the first time one of the Trumps copied the Obamas.

As of Monday morning, Goldman’s post has been retweeted over 136,000 times and liked 283,000 times.

But was the copy intentional or an honest coincidence?

TURKISH RESTAURANT OWNER SELLING $5,000 ‘TRUMP’ PIZZA WITH GOLD FLAKES TO HELP HOMELESS

The baker behind Trump’s cake is Tiffany MacIsaac of Washington, D.C.’s Buttercream Bakeshop. She says the order for the cake was submitted when she was out of town but told The Washington Post that the client allegedly brought in a photo of Obama’s cake and asked for the same design.

“They came to us a couple of weeks ago, which is pretty last minute, and said, ‘We have a photo that we would like to replicate,'” MacIsaac explained to The Post.

The baker said that she tried to persuade the client to use the photo only as an “inspiration” but her recommendation was turned down.

“They said, ‘Nope, they want this exact cake. It’s perfect.’ And we said, great,” she stated.

On Instagram, the bakery also confirmed the design was a copy but acknowledged that they prefer to create original works. “While we most love creating original designs, when we are asked to replicate someone else’s work we are thrilled when it is a masterpiece like this one. @duff_goldman originally created this for Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago and this years committee commissioned us to re-create it.”

MacIsaac says her team is not collecting any profit from the cake and will instead be donating all proceeds from the cake to the pro-LGBT Human Rights Campaign “because basic human rights are something every man, woman and child~ straight, gay or the rainbow in between~ deserve!”

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There was one major difference between Obama’s cake and Trump’s remodel.

Obama’s 50-pound cake featured several layers of flavors ranging from red velvet to pumpkin-chocolate chip. Trump’s cake was mostly inedible with a three-inch slice on the bottom for the first family to eat.

“It’s just a Styrofoam cake. It’s not for eating,” MacIsaac said. “I wasn’t expecting it to be seen on TV.”

Is Trump’s inauguration cake a copycat of Obama’s 2013 cake?

    Uh oh.

    Celebrity baker Duff Goldman tweeted Friday that President Trump’s inaugural cake is identical to the one he made for President Obama in 2013.

    The only problem? He didn’t make Trump’s cake.

    The Food Network star posted a photo of the cake he prepared for President Obama alongside the cake from President Trump’s inaugural ball Friday.

    “The cake on the left is the one I made for President Obama’s inauguration 4 years ago,” Goldman tweeted. “The one on the right is Trump’s. I didn’t make it.”

    President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence cut the nine layer cake, which looks identical to Goldman’s 2013 cake, at The Salute to Our Armed Services Inaugural Ball on Friday.

    Tiffany MacIsaac, owner of Washington’s Buttercream Bakeshop, told The Washington Post she created Trump’s much-talked about cake.

    “They came to us a couple of weeks ago, which is pretty last minute, and said ‘We have a photo that we would like to replicate,’” MacIsaac told the Post. She said bakery associates told the caller to use the pictures as “inspiration,” but they asked for an exact replica.

    She told the Post that the cake was meant to be a prop.

    “It’s just a Styrofoam cake. It’s not for eating,” she said. “I wasn’t expecting it to be seen on TV.”

    MacIsaac told the Post she did not meant to upset Goldman.

    USA TODAY NETWORK has reached out to the White House for comment.

    Follow Mary Bowerman on Twitter: @MaryBowerman

    (Photo: Getty Images, Alex Wong)

    Last night, celebrity baker Duff Goldman—of TV’s Ace Of Cakes—tweeted that the cake at Trump’s inauguration looked suspiciously similar to the one he made for Obama in 2012:

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    From Goldman’s coy tweet, it’s a bit hard to tell just how upset he is about this act of apparent cake plagiarism, but even to an untrained cake artist it’s easy to see that these things are virtually identical. From the colors to the various tiers to the stars shooting out of the top, this is less like a studio copying a popular superhero movie to make a low-budget, straight-to-Redbox knock-off and more like a studio just making the same superhero movie with the same name and hoping nobody will care.

    Goldman has since explained that he was impressed by the mimicry more than he was offended by it, and now the bakery that actually made Trump’s cake has released a statement about it. Rather than yet another company claiming it was simply doing its job and didn’t want to get political, though, this story has a fun twist ending:

    It turns out that D.C.’s Buttercream Bake Shop was specifically hired to replicate Obama’s cake (which says some interesting things about how the Trump administration works), and rather than trying to avoid politics, they casually explain that all of the profits from the job are being donated to the Human Rights Campaign—an LGBT advocacy group. It may not be a flashy protest, but it’s brilliant nonetheless.

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