Fox and friends abby

About two weeks after Sara Haines became the latest to pass through The Revolving Door of The View to host the third hour of Good Morning America with Michael Strahan, it appears Abby Huntsman has won the sweepstakes to replace her.

Fox & Friends Weekend co-host Huntsman, daughter of U.S. Ambassador to Russia Jon Hunstman, would give the show a second conservative host to keep Sen. John McCain’s daughter Meghan McCain company.

A Fox News Channel spokesperson confirmed this will be Huntsman’s final weekend co-hosting Fox & Friends Weekend, the Saturday and Sunday editions of President Donald Trump’s fave morning show.

A source familiar with the situation told Deadline that Huntsman is expected to land at The View, though no deal is done. Expect ABC News to announce shortly before the show’s new season starts, right after Labor Day holiday. The show’s annual eleventh-hour host-changeover announcement soap opera is among reasons the ABC News daytime talker remains a darling of the media.

The View had two vacant panelist chairs; Haines’ announcement followed by four days the news that three-year co-host Paula Faris is leaving the show, and her weekend GMA duties, for a new assignment that includes contributing to Good Morning America and a podcast on faith.

News of the development first surfaced on Mediaite.

Abby Huntsman Still Hasn’t Found Her Way at ‘The View’

If you caught any episodes of The View during Whoopi Goldberg’s absence, you probably witnessed some fireworks. On one February morning, Joy Behar, who was moderating while Whoopi was out, shut down Meghan McCain for what she described as “a hissy fit” on the air.

Since Whoopi’s return, things have calmed down a bit. Whether you credit that to the strength of Whoopi as a moderator or Joy’s reduced role, it’s clear that the show has a delicate personnel balance.

Sunny Hostin and Abby Huntsman, the show’s other two co-hosts, serve as stabilizing forces among its more volatile elements. In Huntsman’s case, there have been rumors she’s been too calming of an influence for producers (i.e., she’s taken the concept to the point of boredom).

Still, it’s far from Huntsman’s first job on TV. Here’s a look at her career and family connection to politics prior to joining The View — and where she stands about six months into the job.

Huntsman’s ‘GMA’ internship and work on her father’s presidential campaign

Whoopi Goldberg, Abby Huntsman, and Joy Behar March 19, 2019 on ABC’s “The View” | Paula Lobo/ABC via Getty Images

Huntsman, who hails from Utah, shares more than conservative views with her co-host Meghan McCain. Her father, Jon Huntsman, also ran for president (in 2012) after serving as Governor of Utah from 2005-09. Abby was going to the University of Pennsylvania at about the same time.

While in school, she interned at ABC’s Good Morning America and later worked at ABC News and GMA. During her father’s run for president, she served as a media adviser and on-air surrogate for his campaign. Her TV career continued with The Cycle on MSNBC.

Following that gig, she worked at Fox & Friends Weekend as an anchor and co-host. When ABC announced her hire in August 2018, Variety described it as the show “getting it right” and noted that it followed a number of outlets that had “burnished their Republican credentials” in the Trump era.

Yet at The View, you might describe her sweet spot as the center-right (much like her father). At times, you will find Huntsman searching for a personal angle and a way to turn up the heat on her take. It doesn’t always make for great TV at The View.

Where Huntsman’s lack of experience in talk/opinion becomes apparent

Lorena Bobbitt is a guest on ABC’s “The View,” Tuesday, February 12, 2019. | Lorenzo Bevilaqua/ABC via Getty Images

Though Huntsman worked for plenty of time on an opinion-first network like Fox News, you can see the reporter — not the person — in her come out frequently on The View. It seems out of place at a table with Joy and Whoopi, both of whom have personality to burn.

Take the March 25 episode, when she started speaking about her disappointment that Trump didn’t “thank” Robert Mueller for his service as special counsel. For anyone who’s ever heard Trump speak, that idea comes off as absurd.

She also warned “Dems” about “overreach” in upcoming investigations following Mueller’s conclusions. (No one has seen the Mueller report yet, mind you.)

These dull, vaguely partisan musings may be the reason why ABC executives reportedly (per Page Six) believed it was “a mistake hiring her” in December and recommended her to a performance coach. On March 26, Huntsman was at it again, wondering about Trump’s behavior.

“I think this is such a moment for the president to bring this country together,” she declared. Not only did that draw a look of extreme disbelief from Whoopi; the reserved Sunny also went into a side-eye stare.

If ABC is looking for a Republican voice, it might want to look in the direction of someone who understands the personality of the president. (Despite her faults, McCain certainly understands who Trump is.)

On a show like The View, where drama is the norm, Huntsman’s brand of stale network-news analysis feels out of place. In that respect, it doesn’t matter that she had a lot of experience on TV. It’s not hard to see why ABC execs would be second-guessing themselves at this point.

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Abby Huntsman and her husband, Jeffrey Livingston, were in for a surprise when they learned they’d be having twins in 2019.

“I knew something was different this time,” Huntsman, 32, who co-hosts the “The View,” told People about heading to the doctor for a pregnancy checkup. “I was actually worried that something was wrong with this pregnancy because I felt sick immediately. I was sick with Isabel (now 13 months), but not until about eight weeks, so I was worried something might have been wrong.”

While the news of twins could brighten anyone’s day, Livingston had a different reaction.

“When the doctor told us , my husband fainted, which was just classic,” Huntsman quipped. “I think he saw two sacs in there and I could see it on his face. He turned white, and then when the doctor told us, he fell. Another doctor had to come in, and they were wiping him down with towels and giving him sugar. I was sitting there with my feet still in the straps. I’m like, ‘This is ridiculous. I’m the one that has to physically do this.’”

Huntsman thinks her husband was going over the costs and logistics associated with having three children all under two.

Huntsman and Livingston welcomed their first child, Isabel, in 2017.

“She just turned 1, and to think you’re gonna be a big sister in just a few months, it’s crazy,” Huntsman said. “But you know what? I think it helps you. I’m one of seven kids, and I love being around a bunch of siblings because I think it teaches you independence, and it teaches you how to grow up quickly and also just be a good friend and be a good sister.”

So far, the pregnancy is going smoothly. She’s craving Cap’n Crunch and Cool Ranch Doritos.

“This will be the more fun stage of pregnancy,” Huntsman added. “The first three or four months are just … it’s not easy for any woman. It’s emotional, and you just want everything to be okay.”

This story originally appeared on Page Six.

The View’s Abby Huntsman Expecting Twins

Abby Huntsman is adding not one, but two babies to her brood!

The View co-host, 32, is pregnant with twins, she reveals to PEOPLE in an exclusive interview about her growing family that includes husband Jeffrey Livingston and their 13-month-old daughter Isabel Grace.

“I knew something was different this time,” Huntsman says of her pregnancy. “I was actually worried that something was wrong with this pregnancy because I felt sick immediately. I was sick with Isabel, but not until about eight weeks, so I was worried something might have been wrong.”

“When I went to the doctor I was, if anything, just concerned about it,” she explains. “Now, looking back, it makes sense, because I think the hormones were triple what they would normally be.”

Huntsman — who revealed on Wednesday’s episode of the panel talk show that she’s having a boy and a girl — tells PEOPLE she doesn’t “have any immediate relatives that have twins” and that when she told her parents the happy news, “they started laughing.”

Want all the latest pregnancy and birth announcements, plus celebrity mom blogs? .

Image zoom Abby Huntsman Image zoom Abby Huntsman’s daughter Isabel Courtesy Abby Huntsman

BIG NEWS! Our @HuntsmanAbby is expecting … TWINS! We couldn’t be more thrilled for her and her husband Jeffery and their 13-month-old daughter Isabel Grace on their growing family! ♥ https://t.co/AjMBy0ZOw4 pic.twitter.com/bTrrugH52k

— The View (@TheView) January 2, 2019

RELATED GALLERY: Proof Two (or Three!) Is Better Than One: From the Carters to the Clooneys, the Cutest Celeb Families of Multiples

Livingston, however, had a much different (but just as memorable) reaction. As the mom-to-be recalls, “When the doctor told us , my husband fainted, which was just classic.”

The couple conceived without fertility treatments, making the surprise an even bigger one — and after the initial shock, a much-welcomed bit of news considering they wanted their children to be close in age.

“I think he saw two sacs in there and I could see it on his face. He turned white, and then when the doctor told us, he fell. Another doctor had to come in, and they were wiping him down with towels and giving him sugar,” Huntsman adds of her husband. “I was sitting there with my feet still in the straps. I’m like, ‘This is ridiculous. I’m the one that has to physically do this.’ “

“It was just one of those things like out of a movie, but I get it,” she continues. “ a dad, I think he’s thinking about the costs of everything and the logistics. Now we’re so excited.”

Image zoom Abby Huntsman Courtesy Abby Huntsman Image zoom Abby Huntsman’s daughter Isabel Courtesy Abby Huntsman

RELATED VIDEO: Celine Dion Celebrates Her Twin Sons’ Eighth Birthday: “You Make Me Proud Every Day”

Huntsman shares with PEOPLE that a select few individuals on The View set — including Whoopi Goldberg and Meghan McCain, who’ve “been so supportive and so great” — were in on her pregnancy news, but she had kept it under wraps from most until now.

“Meghan is one of my best friends, so she was one of the first people I called after I left the doctor, and I was really just overwhelmed,” Huntsman says. “She was so thrilled because her grandma’s a twin, it runs in her family, so she has sent me books about twins. She’s like, ‘My mom always wanted me to have twins,’ so she’s really helped me mentally get through it.”

While she can’t wait to welcome her two newest family members, the star says she’s “most excited” to see daughter Isabel flex her big-sister muscles — despite the “chaos in a New York City apartment” twins will undoubtedly add to. (The family also has a golden retriever named George.)

“She just turned 1, and to think you’re gonna be a big sister in just a few months, it’s crazy,” Huntsman tells PEOPLE of little Isabel. “But you know what? I think it helps you. I’m one of seven kids, and I love being around a bunch of siblings because I think it teaches you independence, and it teaches you how to grow up quickly and also just be a good friend and be a good sister.”

RELATED: Fox News Alum Abby Huntsman Officially Joins The View

Huntsman’s current pregnancy cravings? “Cap’n Crunch” and “Cool Ranch Doritos,” she says, admitting that she eats “all day long” and “splurge(s) every single day on something.”

And while she’s feeling “a mix of emotions” surrounding the news, she’s “very excited” and “so grateful” for her pregnancy and that the babies are healthy.

Still, Huntsman can’t help feeling nervous about how she’ll deliver two babies at once and parent three children under age 2, explaining, “You start thinking about the logistics of just feeding them. How do you feed both at the same time, and what if they’re all crying? All those things go through your mind.”

“I’m real excited for the next chapter when I can announce it, but I think I’m starting to feel a little better,” she continues.

“This will be the more fun stage of the pregnancy. The first three or four months are just … it’s not easy for any woman. It’s emotional, and you just want everything to be okay.”

It’s official: Fox News’ Jedediah Bila is officially the co-host of Fox & Friends Weekend, joining Pete Hegseth and a rotating third co-host on the morning program.

Fox News announced Bila would join the show on a permanent basis this afternoon.

If you’ve been watching Fox & Friends Weekend lately, this announcement won’t come as much of a surprise.

“Jedediah’s thoughtful analysis and endearing personality have cultivated a connection with our audience that has grown exponentially over time,” Fox News svp of morning programming and talent development Lauren Petterson said in a statement. “We are confident that she will make an excellent addition to the Fox & Friends family.”

Bila added, “The opportunity to co-host a program within the Fox & Friends franchise is truly an incredible milestone in my career. I am really excited to build an even stronger relationship with FNC’s loyal viewers and to spend weekends doing great work with an amazing team.”

Bila started her TV news career in 2013 as a Fox News contributor, appearing on panel programs such as Outnumbered and The Five before making the leap to ABC and The View in August 2016.

She left The View in September 2017, and joined Fox News in November 2018 in a contributor role.

The most recent woman to have the Fox & Friends Weekend co-host gig is Abby Huntsman, who became a panelist on The View this past fall.

‘Fox & Friends’ Makes New Bid for TV’s Morning-Show Ad Dollars (EXCLUSIVE)

Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt and Brian Kilmeade are in high demand on set as the anchors of Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends.” Starting Wednesday, however, viewers of the morning program are going to spend some time watching them motoring home, thanks to an advertising deal.

In taped video segments being shown today, tomorrow and Friday, Kilmeade is spotted traveling in Massapequa with his dogs; Earhardt is found outside the Fox News studio; and Doocy picking up his family in Jupiter, Florida. Each host will be shown in a Dodge Durango SRT, and the vignettes will try to spotlight the room the vehicle has for family and luggage – all as the nation moves closer to the holidays. On-air graphics will tell viewers the segment is sponsored by Dodge.

“Fox & Friends” hasn’t been known for embedding advertisers into on-air sponsorships, but executives at Fox News Media hope to change that notion in days to come, says Jeff Collins, executive vice president of ad sales at the Fox Corporation-owned unit. “I think you are going to see a lot more from us in this area moving forward,” he says in an interview.

And with that, “Fox & Friends” enters a raging battle among TV’s morning programs for big-dollar advertising packages. To be sure, the Fox News show carries plenty of commercials. But many TV networks gain millions of dollars from devising in-show opportunities in their A.M. mainstays to highlight advertisers. Citigroup sponsors a summer concert series on NBC’s “Today.” Toyota brings the popular “Eye Opener” segment to viewers of “CBS This Morning” and its logo festoons the show’s on-air waiting room. On Tuesday, viewers of ABC’s “Good Morning America” were notified by an on-air chyron that a cooking segment led by actor Tiffani Thiessen was sponsored by Wells Fargo (which also sponsored an online article about the recipe she presented).

These sorts of ad deals often require careful handling. Starbucks struck a deal with MSNBC in 2009 that put its name and logo alongside that of the network’s popular “Morning Joe.” Viewers grew accustomed to being told that the show was “brewed by Starbucks.” But there were some fraught moments, such as the time then-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz appeared for a minutes-long interview with co-anchor Mika Brzezinski in 2011 without an on-air note from the hosts or the network that his company was a significant sponsor of the show.

“Viewers will get it,” says Collins, as the driving segments will be followed by an on-air “billboard” calling out the Dodge sponsorship as well as a traditional Dodge commercial. Fiat Chrysler, the owner of Dodge, was not able to make executives available for comment.

Fox News will typically not create these sorts of sponsorships around segments devoted to hard news and politics, says Collins. “We have very strong standards-and-practices guidelines.” But he notes Fox News offers regular coverage of softer topics such as health and wellness, home improvement and sports. “That’s where we can do this,” he adds.

Fox News has something to offer Madison Avenue’s morning advertisers. “Fox & Friends” delivers more viewers than most prime-time entertainment programs on other cable outlets – yet costs less than ad slots on broadcast-network morning programs. A 30-second spot on “Fox & Friends” cost $3,400 in 2018, according to Standard Media Index, a tracker of ad spending. Meanwhile, a similar unit in NBC’s “Today” went for $42,700 and one in ABC’s “Good Morning America” cost $34,800.

The Dodge sponsorship is one of the first alliances Collins, who joined Fox in May, is calling attention to publicly. The former CNN ad-sales executive , who was recently chief revenue officer at Viant, a digital-advertising firm owned by Meredith, is trying to snare new dollars for Fox News just as the nation is poised to enter the frenzied 2020 election cycle and Madison Avenue is grappling with the migration of live primetime entertainment audiences to streaming video. Many news programs command sizable live audiences and TV networks are likely to put a new spotlight on news offerings in weeks to come.

“We anticipate we are going to see some strong interest from what are typically more entertainment-focused categories,” says Collins, such as movie studios and quick-service restaurants.

Fox News has had to grapple with scrutiny around remarks made by some of its primetime hosts in recent months, and pressure from advocacy groups on sponsors of those shows. But Collins says some clients may be willing to “dip their toes” in those slots in months ahead.

Fox Corp. has made other on-air personnel available for advertisers. The company has talked to sponsors about working with its Fox Sports announcers in the recent past. In one recent instance, the idea generated significant chatter. In 2017, Fox Sports’ Terry Bradshaw appeared on set with a stain on his shirt, then quickly moved into a taped piece that was a commercial showing him working frantically to remove it using Procter & Gamble’s Tide.

Facing fraud lawsuits, former “Fox & Friends” co-host Clayton Morris flees US

Facing more than two-dozen lawsuits alleging he committed real estate fraud, former “Fox & Friends Weekend” co-host Clayton Morris has reportedly fled the United States, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Morris, who previously resided in a $1.4 million home in New Jersey, moved his family to a coastal resort town in Portugal, the newspaper reported, citing a Facebook post from his wife.

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Morris’s wife and business partner, former MSNBC anchor Natali Morris, told the IndyStar that she and her husband plan to continue fighting the lawsuits from abroad.

Clayton Morris, once named New York’s funniest journalist, left Fox News in 2017 to start a new career assisting aspiring investors who were interested in investing in real estate. He worked with Bert Whalen and his company Oceanpointe Investments. Morris, Whalen and Oceanpointe are at the center of the storm of lawsuits regarding real estate fraud.

Morris has denied the fraud allegations, instead blaming Whalen. He reportedly claimed he was not responsible for managing Oceanpointe’s properties and that he was sickened to learn of tenants living in dangerous and filthy conditions bought, sold or managed by Whalen’s companies. Whalen has also denied any wrongdoing.

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The two men have been accused by investors of running a Ponzi scheme, selling them homes in Indianapolis “with a promise to rehab them, find tenants and manage the properties,” according to IndyStar. Morris reportedly used web-based seminars and YouTube channels to attract potential investors.

The investors have argued that the rehabilitations didn’t happen, according to the newspaper. They “accuse Morris and Whalen of covering their tracks by providing fake leases and sending rent checks even though the properties were vacant Many of the investors say they only discovered the truth when they began receiving code violations and condemnation notices from the city,” the IndyStar reported.

Natali Morris told IndyStar that she and her husband are not responsible for investor losses, instead blaming Whalen.

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“We have and continued to take responsibility for all of our legal challenges that came from our relationship with Oceanpointe. We have answered all of our attorney general requests in all states. We have answered all lawsuits,” she said.

“We have not run from anything,” she added. “We continue to show up for this until the last lawsuit is dismissed and it is clear that we neither had the money from Oceanpointe investors nor did we defraud anyone.”

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In a lengthy post shared Thursday to her personal website, titled “Out of Office Reply,” Natali Morris said legal trouble, mental health issues and negative news coverage prompted the family to leave the country.

“I am not one of those who rejects America,” she wrote. “We had a good life there. But my husband and I have had a hard few years in our business and this collective soul challenge forced us to question everything.”

She said her husband has received a “disproportionate amount of blame, particularly in national press” because of his “residual ‘fame’ from his former career as a news anchor.”

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“But America is polarized and if you can write a headline about a Fox News guy doing something wrong, it will get clicked on in order to reinforce people’s conviction bias, one way or another,” she wrote, adding: “Watching him endure this has felt like what I would imagine it is like to watch him endure chemotherapy.”

Some investors and their attorneys have expressed concerns about the family’s decision to move to Portugal.

“In my clients’ opinion, innocent people don’t flee the country,” Jynell Berkshire, an Indianapolis real estate attorney who is representing several investors, told the IndyStar.

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Morris was an anchor on “Fox & Friends Weekend” from 2008 to 2012, often co-hosting the show with Dave Briggs and Alisyn Camerota. Both Briggs and Camerota are now at CNN.

Natali Morris wrote on her website that she and her husband have “made it our mission to empower other people when it comes to finance so they can live the lives they dream about.”

“On this site I share with you new ways to think about and use your money in order to build legacy wealth for you and your family,” she said.

Abby Huntsman to depart Fox for ABC’s ‘The View’

“Fox & Friends Weekend” co-host Abby Huntsman is leaving the network, reportedly to join ABC’s “The View.”

Mediaite first reported that Huntsman will rejoin former Fox News co-host Meghan McCain on the long-running female roundtable opinion program, replacing Sara Haines who left the show to join the third hour of “Good Morning America.”

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Fox News confirmed to The Hill that this Saturday and Sunday will be Huntsman’s final weekend co-hosting “Fox & Friends Weekend.”

“Abby has lots of fans at ABC and is expected to end up at The View,” a source close to the situation told The Hill.

Huntsman, 32, is the daughter of former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. (R), who was named ambassador to Russia late last year.

The younger Huntsman has been critical of President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate Democrats outraise Republicans, but GOP has cash edge Comey op-ed: US democracy won’t ‘come apart’ if Trump isn’t removed from office Protesters flock to the Capitol after Senate impeachment votes MORE, particularly over his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Newsweek reported. She recently slammed the president after his meeting with Putin last month, in which Trump seemed to side with Russia on U.S. election interference.

“No negotiation is worth throwing your own people and country under the bus,” Huntsman tweeted.

The Hill has reached out to ABC for comment.

“The View” finished its 2017-18 season on a ratings roll, averaging 2.9 million viewers per day. Those figures made it the most-watched season since Barbara Walters retired four years ago, Fox reported.

Other “View” co-hosts include Whoopi Goldberg, Joy Behar, Sunny Hostin and McCain.

The show has been on the air for 21 seasons.

-Updated 7 p.m.

Q&A: Why Abby Huntsman doesn’t like to be labelled ‘conservative’

SALT LAKE CITY — On Abby Huntsman’s third day co-hosting ABC’s “The View,” Nike’s ad featuring Colin Kaepernick was the topic of discussion.

Since the former NFL quarterback knelt during the national anthem to protest racial inequality, debate surrounding that action has divided the country almost more than anything else in the past year, said Huntsman to her three women co-hosts and a live studio audience in New York.

While the former “Fox & Friends” host’s opinions on Kaepernick differed from those of the other women at the table — Whoopi Goldberg, Joy Behar and Sunny Hostin — she was able to find common ground.

“I think you can love this ad and love the inspiration,” Huntsman said on the show that airs weekend mornings. “And, where I come from, where I stand on this, is I do think kneeling for the national anthem is disrespectful. I think you can fall in both places there, both camps.”

The exchange illustrated the 32-year-old Utah native’s genuine desire to listen, debate and come away respecting those with different viewpoints.

Abby Huntsman has been named co-host of ABC’s daytime talk show “The View” beginning in Season 22. “The View” airs Monday-Friday (9-10 a.m., MT) on the ABC Television Network. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, American Broadcasting Companies, Inc.

“It wasn’t blaming the others for what they believe, or simply disagreeing,” Huntsman said, describing the exchange. “It was: How can we get past this and learn from each other? And how do we make race relations better? Because that’s what this is all about. And I’m the first to say we still have many challenges remaining. It’s just a matter of listening to each other.”

Huntsman, the daughter of former Utah governor and current U.S. ambassador to Russia Jon Huntsman Jr. and granddaughter of Jon Huntsman Sr., billionaire philanthropist and former Area Seventy for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, joined the cast of “The View” on Sept. 4 for its 22nd season.

Huntsman spoke with the Deseret News recently about the importance of listening to multiple sides of an issue, her new job on “The View,” being a mother and growing up in Utah. This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Deseret News: Your first day on “The View,” you said people are “so much more complicated than the way we are often defined.” What narrow labels do people assign to you that don’t fit?

Abby Huntsman: I grew up Mormon, so they’ll say, “she’s Mormon, she’s conservative.” They’ll often say I only got where I am because of my dad. You hear so many different things. For me, I try to live life every day by getting to know people for who they are and learning from them. More and more we’re becoming a society where everyone lives in their cul-de-sacs and defines other people by what they think they are, versus what is beyond that. Many of my generation don’t want to be labeled one thing or the other. With politics for example, we’re at a time when both parties are at such an extreme. A lot of us are in that middle area, and that’s where I sit.

Season 22 of “The View” premiered with new co-host Abby Huntsman on Sept. 4, 2018. “The View” airs Monday-Friday (9-10 a.m., MT) on the ABC Television Network. Lorenzo Bevilaqua, American Broadcasting Companies, Inc.

DN: You mentioned the word conservative. So that’s not a label you like to use for yourself?

AH: I don’t like to define myself as necessarily conservative. What is it to be a conservative? What is it to be a Republican, even? You’ve got Trump in the White House, so you could say there’s the Trump party, and then traditionally there’s the Republican Party. But for me, it just depends on what the issue is. I’m probably more fiscally a Republican. But socially, I’m just accepting of everything. I want everyone to be happy; I want everyone to live a life that they’re proud of. So I’m not going to sit there and judge them and speak for them. That’s just who I am.

DN: How do you differ from the other hosts. What unique perspective do you provide that might be valuable to viewers?

AH: You bring your life experiences, you bring your personality, you bring your age. The show was originally created to have someone at that table that everyone in this country can relate too. The minute you watch the show you’re going to see how different we all are. What’s great about it is we’re all friends off-camera. Today, for example, we were talking about parenting, and everyone had their own opinion based on the way their parents raised them, based on how they raised their own kids. And that’s what’s so fun about the show. I’ve learned a lot from them, and I think maybe they’ll learn some things from me. You don’t see that a lot on television today. It’s often just people screaming their points. They’re either in the conservative box or the liberal box and there’s just so much more than that.

DN: You’ve worked for programs that span the ideological spectrum: at Huffpost, MSNBC, Fox, and now ABC. What have you learned from working at these different networks?

AH: That’s me in a nutshell! I have friends from every place that I’ve worked. And they’re all so different. At each place, even though they might be defined ideologically — you think of Fox as being more conservative and MSNBC as more liberal — the people are the same. They’re just good people, and they go on and do their job every day, and they try to help to inform their audience. I’ve really taken something from each place. Now I’m at “The View” where it’s sort of a mix of everything, and that is maybe where I perfectly belong.

DN: I know you don’t like to label yourself, but at certain points you’ve stood up for Trump and some of the decisions he’s made. Do you feel a responsibility to defend Trump or the reputation of the Republican Party?

Omarosa Manigault Newman, author of “Unhinged: An Insider’s Account of the Trump White House” is the guest on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. “The View” airs Monday-Friday (9-10 a.m., MT) on the ABC Television Network. Pictured, from left, are Whoopi Goldberg, Abby Huntsman, Omarosa Manigault Newman, Joy Behar and Sunny Hostin. Jeff Neira, American Broadcasting Companies, Inc.

AH: I don’t feel responsibility to defend anybody. I feel responsibility to speak from my heart and what I feel is true or not, or right or wrong. With Fox, I traveled the country and I got to know so many of the Trump voters. They are wonderful people. I talked to them about the issues they care about and why they voted for him. So when Trump does something, I try to think about those people. Most of them will say: I don’t agree with everything he says; I don’t agree with everything he tweets; but there are certain things he’s doing policywise — he’s standing up for America; he’s standing up for me, the little guy; he’s finally giving me a voice. Do I feel a need to defend them or defend Trump? No. In fact, if you watch all the clips on Fox, I was probably far more critical of Trump than anyone else on our show, and the audience wasn’t always thrilled about that. But I think it’s important that as a country, we understand each other.

DN: How has your father’s experience in Russia informed your views of the Trump presidency?

AH: Trump and my father didn’t know each other that well before, but I think all the interactions they’ve had have been good. My dad is always respectful and will say “I serve the president.” The people who know Trump the best are the most loyal to him, because he’s loyal back to them. I know Kellyanne Conway and others because I worked with them at Fox. They all love Trump. They all feel like he’s treated them wonderfully. At the same time, the moment you’re disloyal to him, you see what happens. Look at (Attorney General) Jeff Sessions right now. It’s not a good place to be. But my dad and Trump have a good working relationship. I think Trump knows my dad, knows what he’s doing over there and really respects him. My dad is such a statesman. I lived with him when he served overseas in Singapore and China. He puts his head down and he does the work. He’s in a really, really difficult job right now, handling probably the most difficult relationship we have, with Russia. With all we’re dealing with, interference in our elections, you name it, he takes that all very seriously. He’ll always say “I am so separated from the politics at home because that’s not part of my job.” It’s funny because Russia is so political, but he’s like, “I’m working hard every day. I’m dealing with Putin and political leaders, I can’t sit and read blogs about the latest controversy at home.”

Co-hosts, from left, Whoopi Goldberg, Abby Huntsman, Joy Behar and Sunny Hostin visit on Wednesday, September 12, 2018, on ABC’s “The View.” Lorenzo Bevilaqua, American Broadcasting Companies,

DN: Some feel “The View” has a history of ripping conservatives. Is the show different now? How do you anticipate being treated as someone who comes from the more conservative end of the spectrum?

AH: I always found it great television. I think I probably have different political views than the other women at the table. But, I haven’t felt since I’ve been here, at all, that I need to be a certain way or say something different than how I feel. So in that sense, I’m totally me out there. Is it different than being at Fox where it seemed like a lot of people felt similarly about a particular issue? Yes, but I like the challenge. For me, it’s fun to go out there and say, ‘You know what, I disagree with you on this, but let’s talk about it.’

DN: How did the time you spent in Utah shape you? What key values or experiences from that time have defined you as a person?

AH: I’m so grateful to have grown up in Utah. I was raised with Mormon values and that taught me so much about family and about love and about living for something that’s bigger than yourself. That is so much of who I am today. Now, raising a 9-month-old, I’m wondering how do I pass those values down to my own daughter? I married an Episcopalian from Florida. Right now we’re combining our upbringings to raise our daughter. It’s a process and we’re still figuring it out. But I think that’s what life’s all about: learning from each other. My husband is the kindest human being. He is so patient and loving, and that’s what attracted me to him in the first place. So I think you start with values and hopefully raise her to be a kind person and a humble one, who is accepting of all people. That’s No. 1 in our house. And then as you go, you take pieces of each, you take this from growing up Mormon, you take that from growing up Episcopalian, and you blend them.

DN: Your grandfather has a legacy of service here in Utah, with the Huntsman Cancer Institute and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. What about your grandfather’s life resonates with you?

Abby Huntsman joins ABC’s “The View”, on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 on ABC’s “The View.” Lorenzo Bevilaqua, American Broadcasting Companies,

AH: I miss him so much. We were really close. He would have written me every single day of the show so far. He would have told me what he thought about what I said or what I could have done differently. He would have told me how proud he was of me. I think about him every single day on the show. It’s been the hardest death I’ve ever experienced in my life. And I think Utah feels his absence because he left so much behind, not only his family, but he left a legacy of giving back. He’s the one who taught me to love all people despite your differences. He was someone who was political, but all of his friends were different. We had Michael Moore on the show last week. And as you know, Michael Moore is not a conservative, nowhere near, and the two of us gave each other a big hug because it was my grandpa who was friends with him. He said, “I loved your grandpa because he was a family man and we shared similar values and he believed in something and I believed in something and we taught each other.” … My grandpa taught me that, and I think he taught the community of Salt Lake that.

DN: You are a new mom. How do you balance your family life with your TV career? What do you understand differently about working mothers now that you are one?

AH: My daughter is the best thing that’s ever happened to me. I love her so much. I spent four months at home with her after she was born, and it was so life-changing in so many ways. But coming to work, I have to shut that off, I have to focus on the job I’m doing. Then, right when we’re off the air, I rush home and focus on her. The best part of my day is coming home to her; just seeing her is my whole world. To be honest, I don’t think I could do this job without experiencing motherhood. It helps me relate to so many other women. I’m never going to judge a woman for the way they want to be a mom, for her marriage or anything else because it’s complicated. It is not easy. Every day is a new challenge.

DN: What has been your experience as a woman on TV? You witnessed the whole Bill O’Reilly fallout at Fox — how is the industry changing?

AH: Times have really changed, and I think in a lot of ways for the good. Women are speaking out and they are feeling comfortable to speak out. I came to FOX right before all that happened, and I was still there at the end of it, after they weathered the storm. Now you look at Fox and they’ve got multiple women running the channel. There’s a phone number you can call if there’s anything you are uncomfortable with, and someone’s there to help you. Frankly, it’s the women who have helped places like Fox become even stronger in the end. I still have so many girlfriends there. It’s sad that it took this long for women to feel comfortable speaking out, but I feel like now that we’re here, we need to learn from each other. I don’t want men to feel uncomfortable. I know so many good men in this world too, and they’ll say “we just feel like we can’t say anything without getting in trouble.” I think it’s going to balance out at some point. It’s a challenging time, but I think that we’ll get through it and we’ll be better for it in the end.

Ex-‘Fox & Friends’ co-host leaves country amid legal scrutiny over real estate deals

Former “Fox & Friends” co-host Clayton Morris fled the U.S. while facing multiple lawsuits over real estate deals, the Indianapolis Star reported Friday.

Morris, who previously resided in a $1.4 million home in New Jersey, has moved with his family to a coastal resort town in Portugal, according a Facebook post from his wife.

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Former MSNBC anchor Natali Morris told the outlet in an email that she and her husband plan to continue fighting the lawsuits from abroad.

Clayton Morris left Fox News in 2017 to become a real estate promoter with Bert Whalen of Indianapolis.

The two men are alleged to have misled at least 35 buyers and renters on the conditions of distressed properties. Morris used web-based seminars and YouTube videos to lure potential investors.

Natali Morris told the outlet that she and her husband are not responsible for losses, instead blaming Whalen and his business, Oceanpointe.

“We have and continued to take responsibility for all of our legal challenges that came from our relationship with Oceanpointe. We have answered all of our attorney general requests in all states. We have answered all lawsuits,” she said.

“We have not run from anything,” she added. “We continue to show up for this until the last lawsuit is dismissed and it is clear that we neither had the money from Oceanpointe investors nor did we defraud anyone.”

Some involved with the lawsuits against Clayton Morris have expressed concerns about the move to Portugal.

“In my clients’ opinion, innocent people don’t flee the country,” Jynell Berkshire, an Indianapolis real estate attorney who is representing several investors, told the Indianapolis Star.

Morris was co-host of “Fox & Friends Weekend” from 2008 to 2017, primarily with Dave Briggs and Alisyn Camerota. Both Briggs and Camerota are now at CNN.