Boy names that mean destruction

How many people share your name? (Picture: metro/ GBG UK names)

Have you ever wondered just how unique and special your name is?

Now you can find out, with a website that calculates how many other people are going by the same identity in the UK.

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The interactive site, put together by identity intelligence company GBG, is based on data from the Open Register.

To use it, you need to type in your first name and last name and it will tell you roughly how many other adults have your name in the UK.

We tried it in the office with a woman we’ve made up called Caroline Smith. Sorry, Caroline – 97% of adults in the UK have a more unique name:

Caroline Smith is in a club of around 800 others going by the same designation.

That’s fine – a little anonymity can be a good thing.

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But if she shortens it to Carrie, she’s suddenly a lot more mysterious, with only 60 people:

According to GBG, the most common name for adults in the UK is David Smith, closely followed by David Jones.

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Despite the stereotype, John Smith only came in as third most popular – there were 25% fewer of them than David Smiths.

In general, men’s names were more likely to be common than women’s.

Susan Smith was the most common name for women, but still only the 12th most popular overall.

The Top 10 most common UK names

1. David Smith (6,163 people)

2. David Jones (5,959 people)

3. John Smith (4,742 people)

4. Michael Smith (4,321 people)

5. David Williams (4,292 people)

6. Paul Smith (3,904 people)

7. Andrew Smith (3,700 people)

8. David Brown (3,393 people)

9. Robert Smith (3,386 people)

10. Peter Smith (3,218 people)

Nick Brown, group managing director at GBG, advised people to take steps to keep their personal details like name, address and date of birth private.

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‘Just because a name isn’t unique does not mean it’s any less valuable to a fraudster,’ he said.

‘In fact, you may even be at greater risk with a more common name as incidents such as account takeover could potentially be harder to spot.

‘While information such as your name or address may seem of little value, fraudsters can piece together other elements of your identity to set up fake accounts in your name. And the consequences can be dire.’

Find out how many people share your name here.

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Cameron Diaz and Benji Madden have an announcement: they’ve welcomed their first child together, a daughter named Raddix. “She has instantly captured our hearts and completed our family,” they wrote, noting that due to privacy concerns, they won’t be sharing pictures of their little one. “She is really really cute! Some would even say RAD.”

It’s safe to say that the unique moniker isn’t on any “Top 100 Baby Names” list—in fact, its origins are essentially un-Googeable (although “radix” does mean “root” in Latin). They are far from the first celebrity parents to give their child an unusual name, lest we forget the arrival of Apple Martin. Then consider rocker Frank Zappa’s (fittingly) bizarrely named children: Moon Unit, Dweezil, and Diva Thin Muffin. More recently, rapper Cardi B named her baby girl Kulture. Here, we’re taking a look back at over 50 of the most surprising celebrity baby names. Some are adorably wacky—Kal-El and Pilot Inspektor come to mind—while some are just sweet and refreshingly unconventional. You might even find some inspiration for your own brood. And if you don’t want to fully commit to an unusual first name, perhaps you can sneak in a fun middle name like Zooey Deschanel did with daughter Elsie Otter.

Raddix
Child of: Cameron Diaz and Benji Madden

Gravity
Child of: Lucky Blue Smith and Stormi Bree

Kal-El
Child of: Nicolas Cage and Alice Kim

Luna Simone
Child of: John Legend and Chrissy Teigen

Pilot Inspektor
Child of: Jason Lee and Beth Riesgraf
Lee reportedly chose the name “Pilot” after hearing a song.

Sunday Molly
Child of: Mike Myers and Kelly Tisdale

Apollo Bowie Flynn, Kingston James McGregor, and Zuma Nesta Rock
Children of: Gavin Rossdale and Gwen Stefani

Rocket, Racer, Rebel, Rogue, and Rhiannon
Children of: Robert Rodriguez and Elizabeth Avellán

Blue Ivy
Child of: Jay Z and Beyoncé

Cricket Pearl and Birdie Leigh
Children of: Marc Silverstein and Busy Philipps

Rosalind Arusha Arkadina Altalune Florence
Child of: Arpad Busson and Uma Thurman

Aleph
Child of: Benjamin Millepied and Natalie Portman

Bear Blu
Child of: Christopher Jarecki and Alicia Silverstone

Kulture Kiari
Child of: Cardi B and Offset

Sparrow James Midnight
Child of: Joel Madden and Nicole Richie

Moroccan and Monroe
Children of: Nick Cannon and Mariah Carey

Reign
Child of: Scott Disick and Kourtney Kardashian

Bear Blaze
Child of: Ned Rocknroll and Kate Winslet

Esmeralda Amada
Child of: Ryan Gosling and Eva Mendes

Apple
Child of: Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow

Suri
Child of: Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes

Exton
Child of: Robert Downey, Jr., and Susan Downey

Seargeoh
Child of: Sylvester Stallone and Sasha Czack

North, Saint, and Chicago
Children of: Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West

Geo Grace and Dusty Rose
Children of: Adam Levine and Behati Prinsloo

Bingham
Child of: Matt Bellamy and Kate Hudson

Poppy Honey Rosie, Daisy Boo Pamela, Buddy Bear, and Petal Blossom Rainbow
Children of: Jamie Oliver and Juliette Norton

Rumer, Scout, and Tallulah Belle
Children of: Bruce Willis and Demi Moore

Fuschia
Child of: Sting and Frances Tomelty

Maddox and Shiloh
Children of: Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie Pitt

Tennessee
Child of: Jim Toth and Reese Witherspoon

Destry
Child of: Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw

Lazer Lee Louis Pentz
Child of: Diplo and Kathryn Lockhart

Elsie Otter
Child of: Jacob Pechenik and Zooey Deschanel

Moon Unit, Dweezil, and Diva Thin Muffin
Children of: Frank Zappa and Adelaide Gail Zappa

Memphis Eve
Child of: Bono and Ali Hewson

Autumn, Sonnet, and True
Children of: Forest Whitaker and Keisha Nash Whitaker

Stormi
Child of: Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott

The movie stars and musicians who make up much of Celebland are often people who enjoy — or have at least come to enjoy, either by will or by force — the spotlight. And more often than not, they’re also creative types, and they understand the value of appearing unique in a crowd. What do you get when you combine all those traits? A lot of weird celebrity baby names.

Not all celebrities take the out-there approach, though: Anne Hathaway named her baby Jonathan, for example. And some stars opt for unique but not quite head-turning options, like Busy Philipps’ daughter Birdie. But then there’s the category of stars who go all in and come up with names for their kids that much of the general public might consider downright, um, bizarre.

Like these.

36. Heiress Harris

Quite the tongue-twister. But luckily, this little girl is the daughter of rapper T.I., so she can probably handle it.

35. Henry Wilberforce

We love Henry, but may the force be with the newest member of the Duggar-Seewald clan if any of his classmates ever find out his middle name. Hey, at least his first name isn’t Spurgeon; that’s his older brother.

34. Audio Science

No, it’s not what Shannyn Sossamon majored in while at college; it’s what she chose to name her baby.

33. Phyllon Gorré

Doutzen Kroes and her husband, DJ Sunnery James, have a son named Phyllon Gorré, which sounds a little bit more like a character on Star Trek than a little boy who roams Earth.

32. Ace Knute

Jessica Simpson’s little boy is adorable, and the name Ace is pretty cute — but there’s just something about that Ace-Knute combo that sounds like a supervillain.

31. Ode Mountain

What else would you expect from the passionate Hunger Games star Jena Malone? Malone welcomed her son with her boyfriend, photographer Ethan DeLorenzo, in 2016 and named the little guy Ode Mountain DeLorenzo Malone. Malone hasn’t revealed the inspiration for her son’s name yet, though we think it makes a great “ode” to nature.

30. Bronx Mowgli & Jagger Snow

Ashlee Simpson and her ex-husband, Pete Wentz, raised some eyebrows when they named their son Bronx Mowgli. Wentz wouldn’t say much about his affinity for the NYC borough, but he did say that Mowgli came from The Jungle Book (obv).

“The Jungle Book was something that me and Ashlee bonded over. It’s a cool name,” he said. Well then.

The name of Ashlee Simpson’s next son — with current husband Evan Ross — would follow suit. The couple welcomed their daughter in 2015 and gifted her with a very unique name that nodded to her musical roots (she’s Diana Ross’ granddaughter, after all): Jagger Snow.

29. Rocket Zot

Avatar star Sam Worthington’s baby name choice for his first child with wife Lara Bingle Worthington came out of left field. In 2015, the couple named their baby boy Rocket Zot — just because they liked the way it sounded. Rocket was a fun first name the Worthingtons chose at random, and Zot was Bingle Worthington’s late father’s nickname.

28. Rainbow Aurora

Holly Madison of The Girls Next Door is known for her glitz and glamour, and she used the same panache when naming her baby girl in 2013. As Madison tells it, adorable little Rainbow Aurora was named after a girl Madison knew (and was jealous of) in school. Despite what the haters had to say, Madison stood behind her daughter’s ultra-unique name choice.

27. North West

Everyone initially thought it was a joke when Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West named their daughter North West. But as it turns out, both Pharrell and Vogue‘s Anna Wintour encouraged the name.

“It was a rumor in the press, and we’d never really considered it seriously at all, but Kanye and I were having lunch right over there at that table about a year ago, and Pharrell came over to us and said, ‘Oh my God, are you guys really going to call your daughter North? That is the best name.’ I said, ‘No, we’re not. That’s just a rumor,’” she told GQ. “Then a little while later, Anna Wintour came over and asked the same thing. She told us, ‘North is a genius name.’ Kanye and I looked at one another and just laughed. I guess at that point it sort of stuck.”

Kimye continued their baby name winning streak when they introduced their second son, named Saint West (not Easton West, as the internet had rumored it to be) in December of 2015. In January of 2018, the couple had a baby via surrogate, giving the newest bundle of joy the name Chicago West.

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A version of this article was originally published in August 2009.

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8 unusual names celebrity baby names from Apple to Bear

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Amal and George Clooney married in 2014

Amal and George Clooney welcomed their first children into the world on Tuesday.

The twins – a girl and a boy – have been named Ella and Alexander.

Congratulations poured in when the announcement of the birth was made, but some were puzzled by their choice of names.

“George and Amal Clooney gave their twins nice normal names? Isn’t that a violation of celebrity rules?” asked one of many fans who took to social media to share how pleasantly surprised they were by the couple’s choices.

While there’s nothing wrong with an unusual name, the rich and famous often tend to go that one step further.

Here are some of the most bizarre and brilliant celebrity baby names from recent years.

1. Apple – Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow

Image copyright Getty Images

Where better to start than right at the beginning of the alphabet?

“A is for Apple” is a very familiar phrase indeed to parents trying to teach their kids the alphabet, but it also proved inspirational to Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow.

The pair, who “consciously uncoupled” in 2014, have a 13-year-old daughter by the name of Apple.

The name caused Robbie Williams to get into a bit of a verbal tangle during one encounter with the family, as he told Graham Norton in 2012.

During a party he was throwing, the singer asked Paltrow at the buffet: “Does Melon want some Apple?”

2. Bear – Liam Payne and Cheryl

Bear may not be too out of the ordinary – but it is certainly a name you remember.

And, as Liam explained last month, that’s precisely why he and Cheryl chose it, although not without a bit of debate.

“I wanted a more traditional name and she wanted a name that was more unusual,” he said.

“And the reason she chose Bear in the end was because Bear is a name that when you leave a room, you won’t forget. And I like that.”

It probably also helps that Liam is a big fan of Bear Grylls, who he described as “a boss” on Twitter after the birth.

3. North – Kim Kardashian and Kanye West

Image copyright Reuters

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West welcomed their first baby in 2013.

Fans speculated for months about what the pair would name their first-born, bearing in mind that the child would probably take Kanye’s surname.

The couple delivered a name better than anyone could have hoped for – North. Which makes their daughter’s full name North West.

News of the name was particularly welcomed by those in Lancashire.

Kardashian’s mother Kris Jenner said after the birth: “The way Kim explained it to me was North means ‘highest power’, and she says that North is highest point together. And I thought that was really sweet.”

The Wests followed it up by naming their second son Saint in 2015. No pressure on him to be well behaved, then.

4. Blue Ivy – Jay Z and Beyonce

Image copyright Getty Images

Beyonce and Jay-Z made headlines in 2012 when they named their first born daughter Blue Ivy Carter.

They even tried to trademark the name, but the rights had already been granted to Boston-based wedding firm Blue Ivy Events.

There’s a theory that Ivy was chosen because of the couple’s fondness for the number four, which is IV in Roman numerals.

Blue was actually a more common name at one stage – famous Blues include author Blue Balliett, born in 1955, and NBA player Blue Edwards, born 1965, though both are nicknames.

And while Beyonce and Jay-Z may have given the name a new lease of life, they weren’t the first celebrity couple to choose the colourful name for their offspring.

U2’s The Edge chose the name Blue Angel for his daughter, who is now 27.

5. Princess Tiaamii – Katie Price and Peter Andre

Princess may be a term of endearment many parents use for their daughter, but fewer choose it as an actual name.

That didn’t deter Peter Andre and Katie Price from giving the name to their daughter in 2007.

But perhaps even more unusual is the second part of her name – Tiaamii.

Peter and Katie came up with the name by merging the first names of their two mothers – Thea and Amy.

Full marks for creativity, although Pete did reveal in 2014 that their daughter said she didn’t like her name.

6. Brooklyn – David and Victoria Beckham

Image copyright PA

No feature about celebrity baby names would be complete without a mention of the Beckhams.

Their unusual choices include Brooklyn, Romeo and Cruz for their sons and Harper Seven for their daughter.

The names were mocked by some though.

Brooklyn in particular was singled out by Katie Hopkins as an example of a children’s name she really disliked in her famous This Morning interview on the subject in 2013.

We can’t imagine the 18-year-old is losing any sleep over that though, he’s a bit busy preparing for the release of his first photography book later this month.

7. Milan – Shakira and Gerard Pique

Image copyright Getty Images

Brooklyn is far from the only celebrity child to be named after a geographical location.

We’d be here all day if we started listing the celebrities who name their children after countries and capitals, so let’s just single out a couple of examples.

Shakira welcomed the first of her two sons with FC Barcelona player Gerard Pique in 2013, whom the couple named Milan.

Then there’s Michael Jackson’s daughter Paris, Bono’s daughter Memphis, Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger’s daughter Ireland and Alicia Keys’s son Egypt.

Ramsgate is still available, should any stars out there still be on the lookout.

8. River Rocket – Jamie and Jools Oliver

Image copyright Getty Images

Jamie Oliver. A national treasure, a talented chef, a recognisable TV personality and the absolute king of unusual names.

His youngest child with wife Jools is called River Rocket, with their other offspring called Daisy Boo, Buddy Bear, Poppy Honey and Petal Blossom.

We take our hat off to him for the sheer creativity of these delightful names – and his consistency deserves a special mention too.

There’s alliteration with the boys (Buddy Bear and River Rocket) and a flower-based theme for the girls (Daisy, Poppy and Petal).

The Oliver tribe aside, there must surely be plenty more weird and wonderful celebrity baby names to come in the months and years ahead.

When exactly is Beyonce due to give birth to those twins…?

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Lucifer not an acceptable baby name in this country

Carla Bleiker Deutsche Welle Published 2:46 PM EDT Oct 26, 2017 Newborn babies born on December 12, 2012. Juni Kriswanto, AFP/Getty Images

What the heck? That’s probably what a civic registry office employee thought when he saw the request made by a couple from the central German city of Kassel. The parents wanted to register their newborn son as Lucifer.

The registrar refused to put the rather unusual name into the baby’s birth certificate, the parents refused to choose a different one. The case ended up in court, where, eventually, mom and dad were convinced to not saddle their son with a name that many people across the world associate with pure evil. The baby boy is now named Lucian.

The Latin word “lucifer” means “morning star” or, as an adjective, “light-bringing.” But today the name is a synonym for the devil. In Christian tradition, Lucifer was used as the proper name of the devil before his fall from grace. In popular culture Lucifer is synonymous with the devil or Satan.

Because the name stands for the personification of evil, the Association for the German Language (GfdS) considers it problematic and not appropriate.

“At the center of decisions like this is the well-being of the child,” Frauke Rüdebusch from the GfdS told newspaper Die Welt.

While there are no laws about what parents can name their children in Germany, parents cannot name them anything they want to. The registrar has to approve every name to go on a baby’s birth certificate.

If she is unsure, she can consult with the GfdS or, if she considers a name inappropriate and the parents won’t budge, go to court — all to prevent boys and girls from growing up with names that open them up to ridicule later in life.

Most parents in Germany decide on more conventional names for their children. The GfdS collects records of hundreds of registry offices across the country each year to compile a list of the most popular names. In 2016, they received more than one million individual entries, covering 97% of all baby names given that year.

The most popular names for girls born in 2016 were Marie, Sophie and Sophia. For boys, the top three were Elias, Alexander and Maximilian. More unusual names that were approved in 2016 include Fips and Twain, as in Mark.

In previous years, parents were allowed to name their children Gandalf, Godsgift or Kastanie (German for “chestnut”), for example. Moms and dads who wanted to go with Vespa, Westend or Dracula, on the other hand, were refused and had to go back to the drawing board.

In 2015, a refugee mother was so grateful for her new life in Germany that she named her daughter Angela Merkel, after the German chancellor.

Harriet illegal in Iceland

Other countries have different rules when it comes to naming babies. In Iceland, parents can choose from a list of roughly 1,850 female and 1,700 male names for their babies. If they aren’t happy with any of the choices, they can appeal to the Icelandic Naming Committee. To pass the test, a name can only have letters that are part of the Icelandic alphabet, and must be “capable of having Icelandic grammatical endings.”

This reporter’s name wouldn’t fly in Iceland, since the nation’s alphabet does not include the letter C. Harriet is also a no-go, as a British-Icelandic family found out. The British father and Icelandic mother where aghast when the national registry refused to renew their 10-year-old daughter’s passport in 2014 because it did not recognize her name. Harriet cannot be conjugated in Icelandic.

All citizens of the People’s Republic of China aged 16 and older must carry identity cards, which are processed electronically. That’s why all names must be spelled with characters that can be entered into or processed by a computer. Of the roughly 70,000 known Chinese characters, both simplified and traditional, only around 32,200 fulfill this requirement.

The US is famous for having lax rules on what names are allowed. Celebrities have kids named North, Apple or Blue Ivy. Regular citizens go crazy as well, naming their children Prince Charles, I’munique or Hellzel – who would make a perfect sister to the little German boy almost named Lucifer.

This article originally appeared on DW.com. Its content was created separately from USA TODAY.

Published 2:46 PM EDT Oct 26, 2017

Getty Images

For at least one Tennessee family, it’s very likely that a “Messiah” will return. Late last week, a judge in the small town of Newport ordered that a 7-month old boy’s name be changed from Messiah to Martin, saying that “it’s a title that has only been earned by one person … Jesus Christ.” But legal experts say the judge overstepped — even abused — her authority and expect the mother to handily prevail when her appeal goes before a county chancellor next month.

Legal decisions about children must weigh parents’ right to raise their children however they see fit, an implicit freedom the Supreme Court has grounded in the Constitution, against the government’s “parens patriae” authority — Latin meaning father of the country — which allows officials to intervene on behalf of vulnerable kids. Though many states have laws governing what a parent can name their child and there are times when a child’s name might warrant action, family law professors say “Messiah” didn’t put the infant in harm’s way.

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“Parents enjoy extraordinary autonomy in raising their children,” says Melissa Murray, a family law professor at the University of California, Berkeley. “This is totally absurd … If this stood up in court, I would eat my hat.”

In ordering the name change, Child Support Magistrate Lu Ann Ballew argued that the Tennessee boy lives in a heavily Christian area where a name like Messiah “could put him at odds with a lot of people.” But Murray and other experts say whatever perceived harm comes from a name like Messiah isn’t enough to justify a judicial order. Indeed, plenty of babies would be in legal limbo if Ballew’s theory stood. More than 800 American children born in 2012 were named Messiah, according to the Social Security Administration; nearly 4,000 were named Jesus; about 500 were named Mohammed; and 29 baby boys were named Christ.

The bigger problem, Columbia University Law Professor Elizabeth Scott says, is the nature of Ballew’s justification. “The judge made it clear that her primary motivation was religious … the child’s name offended her Christian beliefs,” she says via email. “Thus her decision violates the First Amendment.” Kathryn Bradley, a family law professor at Duke University, says it “seems like the court really is overstepping its bounds in terms of imposing the court or the community’s beliefs … on the child.” It didn’t help that Jaleesa Martin and the child’s father had gone before Ballew because they couldn’t agree on the child’s last name, not his first. Berkeley’s Murray says she believes the judge’s action may rise to level of being an “abuse” of her power.

When and whether government officials can object to baby names is often dependent on state law. In 2009, three-year-old Adolf Hitler Campbell made headlines when a New Jersey bakery refused to decorate a cake ordered by his father. The business may have been within its rights to refuse service, but the state had little ground on which to object. New Jersey law allows parents to confer any name on a child so long as it doesn’t include obscenity, numerals or symbols. “If the Campbells had named their son ‘R2D2,’ state authorities would have intervened,” Carlton Larson, a law professor at the University of California, Davis wrote in a 2011 study of United States baby names. “‘Adolf Hitler Campbell,’ by contrast, presented no legal impediments.”

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The baby naming laws of individual states, Larson’s study found, vary widely. In California, baby names cannot contain umlauts or accents. In South Dakota, if a mother is unmarried at the time of conception, her surname goes on the birth certificate (unless a man signs an affidavit saying he’s the father). Roman numerals are allowed for suffixes in Texas, but not Arabic ones, so a boy could be Rick Perry III but not Rick Perry 3. In Massachusetts, the total number of characters in first, middle and last names cannot exceed 40. New Hampshire, meanwhile, prohibits all punctuation marks except for apostrophes and dashes.

These rules aren’t limited to the U.S. Spain bans “extravagant” names while Portugal outlaws those that “raise doubts about the sex of the registrant.” And in New Zealand, a judge in 2008 spared a girl of being called Tulula Does The Hula From Hawaii; in his ruling he cited other names nixed by registration officials, such as Fish and Chips, Keenan Got Lucy and Sex Fruit. A 1995 act states that “unreasonably long” names are “undesirable in the public interest” in New Zealand.

While reactions to the Messiah order have centered on the questions of religious freedom and free speech, the inspiration behind the name seems to be a common one: the appeal of alliteration. Martin said she thought the name was unique and complemented the names of his two older siblings: Micah and Mason.

God, Lucifer among popular baby name trends for 2017

There was a time when monikers like Bear, Blue and Rainbow seemed to be reserved for celebrity offspring, but according to Nameberry, distinct names will be all the rage come 2017.

In fact, based on their data, parents-to-be will look to Tinsletown and a host of other things – like literary figures and spiritual leaders – for baby naming inspiration (the animal kingdom will even play its part).

READ MORE: The world’s most popular baby names for 2016 (at least so far)

“For 2017, we foresee a continual broadening of what can be considered a baby name,” Nameberry reports. “There will be more word names and place names and unexpected hero names and every category will be stretched to its extreme.”

So what names will top the list next year?

Ultimate power names

It’s not enough to name your child something that sounds commanding; in 2017, a name will also have to symbolize power.

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While monikers like Royal, Saint, Augustus and Kylo were the top power names, parents in the coming year will look to the top of power and spiritual food chains for inspiration.

Some may even look to God (yep, God).

According to Nameberry, five boys in 2015 were marked with the moniker. There were also 20 boys named Lord and 27 called Savior. The most popular of them all was Messiah; more than 1,500 baby boys were given the name in 2015.

As for girls, 40 of them were named Goddess.

Deity names like Thor, Persephone, Odin, Freya, Jupiter, Luna, Atlas, Clio, Orion, Morrigan, Pandora and Zeus are also predicted to rise in popularity next year.

And for those parents looking to shake things up even more, evil power baby names are on the comeback list. Names like Lucifer, Lilith (a demon of Jewish folklore) and Kali (the Hindu destroyer) are expected to be written on birth certificates everywhere.

Fun fact: this spiritual naming trend is actually banned in some countries, including New Zealand.

Literary names

If spiritual names aren’t your thing, then perhaps consider a more intellectual approach.

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“Naming your child after a favourite literary character gives you a lifetime’s worth of intellectual credibility without having to actually (yawn) crack a book,” Nameberry says. “But there’s power in these baby names too, the power of literature to endure and inspire no matter what’s happening in the world.”

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Think Matilda, Ramona, Fern, Alice and Holden.

Shakespearian names like Juliet, Romeo, Cordelia, Ophelia, Cassio, Orlando and Puck will also be on the tips of tongues.

Author names like Austen, Bronte, Poe, Wild, Angelou, Dashiell, Willa, Louisa and Zadie will also appear on birth certificates.

Inspiration names by celebrities

Some parents will be following in the footsteps of the latest Kardashian parent.

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“When Rob Kardashian and Blac Cyna named their newborn daughter Dream, a baby naming trend was not merely born but launched out into the wider world,” Nameberry says.

To that end, the site predicts Justice, True, Grace, Pax, Bodhi and Zen, as well as Mercy and Patience will continue to grow in popularity.

The circle of life

The animal kingdom will also offer inspiration to parents.

Celebrity moms and dads like Alicia Silverstone, Kate Winslet and Jamie Oliver have already embraced the animal-inspired naming trend by branding their children Bear. One hundred and thirty-four other baby boys were given the name in the U.S. last year.

Other animal names on the rise (mostly for boys) include Fox, Wolf, Lynx, Tiger, Falcon, Hawk and Lionel.

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Nameberry also says folks should keep an eye on names like Puma, Jaguar and Python.

Names related to water are also trending. Rain, Bay, Lake, Ocean/Oceane, Rio, Brook and River for both sexes are on the list.

The site predicts a rise in names like Harbor, Bayou, Aqua, Ford, Marin/Marina and Delta, as well as Nile, Arno, Hudson and Caspian, too. Tallulah, Mira and Kai may also spring up.

Other trends

Baby names starting with the letter “o” are predicted to explode in popularity.

For girls, Olivia is expected to be number one, followed by Olive, Ophelia, Octavia, Olympia, Oakley and Oona.

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For boys, Oliver, Owen, Oscar, Orson, Otis, Omar, Otto, Oberon, Osias, Osiris, Osmond and Oz top the list.

According to Nameberry, conservative parents are taking a shining to rich- and privileged-sounding names for boys.

On the rise are names ending in “s” like Brooks, Hayes, Briggs, Yates, Ames, Oakes, Niles and Collins.

Also popular will be longer names like Anderson, Winston, Remington, Kensington, Montgomery, Whitaker and Winchester.

For girls, Downton Abbey is where a lot of inspiration will be found.

Names of the Crawley family women – like Sybil, Rosamund, Edith, Isobel, Daisy, Elsie, Marigold and Mary – will be given to little girls everywhere.

Parents will also draw inspiration from female ancestors in their own family trees.

The science of baby names

According to researchers at the Columbia Business School, baby-naming trends often grow quickly before they lose momentum.

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Their research found that:

  • Parents are more likely to give their baby a name that has recently grown in popularity
  • Parents often give names that phonetically resemble their social category
  • Female names go in and out of style faster than male names

But the name you choose can have a profound impact on a child that echoes into adulthood, say researchers at Northwestern University. For example, giving a boy a girly-sounding name could set the child up for behavioural problems later in life.

There’s also the possibility that kids with unique names will face undue hardship, Live Science reports.

So what’s a parent to do? Potentially stick to tradition. A 2010 British study looked at 3,000 parents who said they wished they would have picked a less popular name, as reported by the NY Daily News.

Among the parents, one in five say they’ve regretted the name they’d chosen for their child, while one in 10 say they chose a quirky name only to have the novelty quickly wear off.

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

FACT CHECK: We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn’t look right, click here to contact us!

The Devil, also referred to as Satan, is best known as the nemesis of good people everywhere. His image and story have evolved over the years, but this malevolent being—and his legion of demons—continue to strike fear in people from all walks of life as the antithesis of all things good.

The Devil in the Bible

Although the Devil is present in some form in many religions and can be compared to some mythological gods, he’s arguably best known for his role in Christianity. In modern biblical translations, the Devil is the adversary of God and God’s people.

It’s commonly thought that the Devil first showed up in the Bible in the book of Genesis as the serpent who convinced Eve—who then convinced Adam—to eat forbidden fruit from the “tree of the knowledge” in the Garden of Eden. As the story goes, after Eve fell for the Devil’s conniving ways, she and Adam were banished from the Garden of Eden and doomed to mortality.

Many Christians believe the Devil was once a beautiful angel named Lucifer who defied God and fell from grace. This assumption is often based the book of Isaiah in the Bible which says, “How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! How art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations.”

Devil Names

Some biblical scholars, however, claim Lucifer isn’t a proper name but a descriptive phrase meaning “morning star.” Still, the name stuck and the Devil is often referred to as Lucifer.

Names for the Devil are numerous: Besides Lucifer, he may be referred to as the Prince of Darkness, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles, Lord of the Flies, the Antichrist, Father of Lies, Moloch or simply Satan.

The book of Ezekiel includes another Biblical passage Christians refer to as proof of the Devil’s existence. It admonishes the greedy King of Tyre but also refers to the king as a cherub who was once in the Garden of Eden. As a result, some Bible translators believe the King of Tyre was a personification of the Devil.

The Devil make more appearances in the Bible, especially in the New Testament. Jesus and many of his apostles warned people to stay alert for the Devil’s cunning enticements that would lead them to ruin. And it was the Devil who tempted Jesus in the wilderness to “fall down and worship him” in exchange for riches and glory.

The Devil in Other Religions

Most other religions and cultures teach of an evil being who roams the earth wreaking havoc and fighting against the forces of good. In Islam, the devil is known as Shaytan and, like the Devil in Christianity, is also thought to have rebelled against God. In Judaism, Satan is a verb and generally refers to a difficulty or temptation to overcome instead of a literal being.

In Buddhism, Maara is the demon that tempted Buddha away from his path of enlightenment. Like Christianity’s Jesus resisted the Devil, Buddha also resisted temptation and defeated Maara.

In people of almost any religion or even in those who don’t follow a religion, the Devil is almost always synonymous with fear, punishment, negativity and immorality.

The Devil and Hell

Perhaps the most lasting images of the Devil are associated with Hell, which the Bible refers to as a place of everlasting fire prepared for the Devil and his angels. Still, the Bible doesn’t state the Devil will reign over hell, just that he’ll eventually be banished there.

The idea that the Devil governs hell may have come from the poem by Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy, published in the early fourteenth century. In it, God created hell when he threw the Devil and his demons out of Heaven with such power they created an enormous hole in the center of the earth.

In his poem, Dante portrayed the Devil as a grotesque, winged creature with three faces—each chewing on a devious sinner—whose wings blew freezing cold winds throughout hell’s domain.

The Bible doesn’t describe the Devil in detail. Early artistic interpretations of The Divine Comedy featuring shocking images of the Devil and his demons inflicting almost unimaginable human suffering only emboldened people’s thoughts about hell and the Devil.

And by the end of the Middle Ages, the Devil had taken on the appearance of the horned, trident-wielding figure with a tail that has endured to modern times.

The Devil and Witches

Fear of the Devil is at least partially responsible for the witchcraft hysteria of Europe and New England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Protestants and Catholics accused many people of practicing witchcraft and making deals with the Devil.

The Puritans living in New England’s early colonies were petrified of the Devil. They believed he gave powers to witches to those faithful to him. This fear gave rise to the infamous Salem Witch Trials in Salem, Massachusetts.

The Puritan’s strict lifestyle, their fear of outsiders, and their terror of so-called “Devil’s magic” led them to accuse at least 200 people of witchcraft between 1692 and 1693—twenty of the accused were executed.

The Devil in Modern Times

Religious translations are often controversial. There’s usually some degree of dissent on how to interpret early texts, and texts about the Devil are no exception.

Even so, throughout history, the Devil’s reputation as an evil-doer hasn’t changed much. Most Christians still believe he’s literally transformed the world and is responsible for much of the world’s corruption and chaos.

Not all religions shun the Devil, though. People of the Church of Satan, known as Satanists, don’t worship the Devil, but embrace him as a symbol of atheism, pride and liberty, among other things. Another type of Satanists, theistic Satanists, worship the Devil as a deity. They may practice Satanic rituals or even make Satanic pacts.

Read more: Satanism

There’s no shortage of Hollywood films featuring the Devil. He’s been played by some of Hollywood’s elite such as Jack Nicholson, Vincent Price and Al Pacino. And after Mia Farrow’s character gave birth to Satan’s offspring in the horror-flick Rosemary’s Baby, expectant mothers who saw the film wished they hadn’t.

Given the draw of the battle between good and evil, it’s likely the Devil’s influence is here to stay, and he will continue to influence religion and pop culture.

Sources

A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials. Smithsonian.com.
Devil Worship in the Middle Ages. Loyola University New Orleans.
Jewish Concepts: Demons and Demonology. Jewish Virtual Library.
Puritans Beliefs on Satan and Witchcraft. Gettysburg College.
The Buddha’s Encounter with Mara the Tempter: Their Representation in Literature and Art. Access to Insight.
Is “Lucifer” the Devil in Isaiah 14:12? – The KJV Argument against Modern Translations. Bible.org.
A Satanist on Why Everything You Think You Know About His Religion Is Wrong. The Independent.
Theistic Satanism: The new Satanisms of the era of the Internet. TheisticSatanism.com.

Stay on target

  • Six Reasons Why Watching ‘Cats’ Feels Like Being in Hell
  • The 11 Best Demons to Summon

It’s your boy J. Thor Kensen back with another list for you, and this one’s topical because it’s always topical. Why’s that? Because people are always having babies. Seriously. They’re doing it pretty much constantly, all over the planet. And no matter where they do it, they tend to, sooner or later, name that baby something. The thing is, most baby names are lousy. Really lousy. Names like “Chris” or “Sheilah” or “Jordan” or “Aubrey.”

Instead of naming a kid after your aunt or a Happy Potter character or a compass direction or, I dunno, whatever the celebs are doing these days, why not name them after something that can really help them out? More than your great aunt’s inheritance even. That’s right; your old pal J. Thor is talking about demons.

And devils. And, if we’re being 100% honest with you, evil gods. But six one, half dozen the other, right? Collected here are the top eleven demons and devils, not to worship or summon or anything crazy like that, but to simply name your baby after. And because we consider ourselves extremely woke here at Geek.com, it’s our contention that any of these names can be used for male, female or non-binary babies, for those enlightened folks out there who plan on raising their spawn gender-free.

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1. Paimon

via commons.wikimedia.org

Let’s start with a classic, shall we? Paimon shows up in a ton of different grimoires, but most of them agree on how good looking he is. Naming your kid Paimon is a great way to hedge your bets that they’ll end up being a looker and/or riding a camel.

2. Baphomet

via commons.wikimedia.org

Baphomet gets brought up whenever someone starts talking about demons, but that’s just because Baphomet is kinda the best. Part man, part woman, part goat, part, I dunno, crow or something, but all demon. You could call your baby “Baph” for short, or do that weird British thing and call him “Omet.”

3. Lucifuge

via commons.wikimedia.org

Lucifuge Rofocale isn’t just a demon, he’s the demon that runs the government of Hell. Guess that makes him doubly evil, am I right? More importantly, however, Lucifuge is also the name of Danzig’s best album.

4. Amon

via commons.wikimedia.org

Let’s stop beating around the bush, huh? If you’re naming your kid after a demon, chances are you want them to get some magic out of the deal. If that’s the case, you could do a lot worse than Amon, which is the demon that gave Akira, of classic manga/anime character Devilman, his powers.

5. Kassogtha

via tumblr

Any of these names work for every gender, but you might find yourself looking for something a little more traditionally feminine. In that case, opt for Kassogtha, who was the mate of the legendary Cthulhu. It’s a moniker so lovely that you’ll forget it refers to a slimy pile of tentacles.

6. Barbatos

via commons.wikimedia.org

Another goetic demon, Barbatos has a full bag of tricks, including the ability to chat with beasts and find a treasure hidden by magic. Really though, the big advantage to naming your kid Barbatos is that it’s a lot easier to come up with a nickname (Barb, Barbie, etc.) than with Paimon.

7. Balor

via thepicta.com

Technically, Balor is more a god than a demon, but seeing as he’s the god of nasty stuff like drought and blight and destruction, our editors said we could include him. Plus, it’s an excuse for us all take a nice long gander at the abs on WWE Superstar Finn Balor.

8. Tengu

via totaljapandemonium.wordpress.com

Though this list has been unfortunately Eurocentric thus far, that changes with the inclusion of the Tengu. Some Japanese traditions see them as less demonic than others, but listen: They’re red, magical and have giant schnozzolas. What would you call them?

9. Mammon

via commons.wikimedia.org

If you’re trying to land on a name that will predict success for your precious babe, Mammon is an excellent choice. Yeah, it’s a demon or god of all-consuming greed, but there’s no ethical consumption under late capitalism, so I say you just run with it.

10. Etrigan

via toonopedia.com

It’s not the first Jack Kirby character that we’d suggest you name your baby after (that would be Murder Machine), but if you’re committed to the whole demon thing, you could do a lot worse than that infernal poetry enthusiast, Etrigan.

11. Asmodeus

via irock.cl

Another demon included in the Ars Goetia, Asmodeus also has something else very important going for him: His name is sung in the chorus of Ghost’s song “Year Zero.” Imagine what a kick your child will get out of that when they find a recording of the song in the blasted, ruined nightmare landscape that you’ve damned them to by bringing them kicking and screaming into this world.

J Thor Kensen is the illegitimate brother of K. Thor Jensen.

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Don Stewart :: What Are Some of the Different Titles of Satan?

Satan, or the Devil, has been given a number of titles in Scripture.
1. Satan
Fifty-two times in Scripture this being is designated as Satan.

Now it came about on the day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, that Satan also came among them (Job 1:6).
2. Day-Star
In Isaiah this creature is called the “day star.” This has the idea of “bearer of light.” This name, translated into Latin, is Lucifer. This was the name of Satan before his fall.
How you are fallen from heaven, O day-star, son of the morning! how you are cut down to the ground, that did lay low the nations! (Isaiah 14:12).
The true “day star” and “bearer of light” is the Lord Jesus Himself.
It is I, Jesus, who sent My angel to you with this testimony for the churches. I am the root and the descendant of David, the bright morning star (Revelation 22:16).
Jesus is the true light.
The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world (John 1:9).
3. Son Of The Morning
He is also titled “son of the morning.”
How you are fallen from heaven, O day-star, son of the morning! how you are cut down to the ground, that did lay low the nations! (Isaiah 14:12).
4. The Anointed Cherub
This angel was also called the “anointed cherub.”
You were the anointed cherub that covered: and I set you, so that you were upon the holy mountain of God; you have walked up and down in the midst of the stones of fire (Ezekiel 28:14).
5. The Devil
This is one of the most popular names for this personage. It only appears in the New Testament.
Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the Devil (Matthew 4:1).
The Devil literally means “slanderer.” Satan is called this because he slanders both God and humanity. In the Garden of Eden, he slandered God’s character.
And the woman said to the serpent, “From the fruit of the trees of the garden we may eat; and the serpent said to the woman, “You surely shall not die! “For God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil” (Genesis 3:2,4,5).
He now accuses believers.
Then I heard a loud voice in heaven, proclaiming, “Now have come the salvation and the power and the kingdom of our God and the authority of his Messiah, for the accuser of our comrades has been thrown down, who accuses them day and night before our God (Revelation 12:10).
6. Tempter
Satan is the one who tempts people to sin. He wants to bring out the worst in each of us.
The tempter came and said to Him, “If You are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread” (Matthew 4:3).
7. Ruler Of Demons
This evil personage is called the ruler of the demons.
But the Pharisees said, “By the ruler of the demons He drives out demons” (Matthew 9:34).
8. Beelzebul
Satan is known as Beelzebul, which means “lord of the flies,” or “lord of dung.”
But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, “It is only by Beelzebul, the ruler of the demons, that this fellow casts out the demons” (Matthew 12:24).
9. The Evil One
Satan is also called the “evil one.”
When anyone hears the word of the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what is sown in the heart; this is what was sown on the path (Matthew 13:19).
10. Enemy
He is the enemy of humanity.
and the enemy who sowed them is the Devil, and the harvest is the end of the age; and the reapers are angels (Matthew 13:39).
11. Liar
Jesus made it clear that Satan is always a liar. Liar, therefore, is an appropriate title.
You are of your father the Devil . . . there is no truth in him. When he speaks a lie, he speaks of his own nature: for he is a liar, and the father thereof (John 8:44).
12. Father Of Lies
He is the one who originated lies.
When he speaks a lie, he speaks of his own nature: for he is a liar, and the father thereof (John 8:44).
13. Murderer
This fallen angel is also a murderer.
You are of your father the Devil, and the lusts of your father it is your will to do. He was a murderer from the beginning (John 8:44).
14. Ruler Of This World
Satan is the ruler of this world in the sense that the world is still characterized by sin. Jesus said.
I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming. He has no power over Me (John 14:30).
This title suggests that he is the major influence over our world. Scripture teaches that the whole world is in his power.
We know that we are of God, and the whole world lies in the evil one (1 John 5:19).
15. God Of This Age
He is the god of this present age.
in whom the god of this age has blinded the minds of the unbelieving, that the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should not dawn upon them (2 Corinthians 4:4).
16. Angel Of Light
He appears as an angel of light.
And no marvel; for even Satan fashions himself into an angel of light (2 Corinthians 11:14).
17. Belial
The idea behind Belial is “vileness.” This title may be applied to the Devil only by implication.
What agreement does Christ have with Belial? Or what does a believer share with an unbeliever? (2 Corinthians 6:15).
18. Ruler Of The Authority Of The Air
He is the authority over this present, evil world-system.
in which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of the air, the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient (Ephesians 2:2).
19. Adversary
This being stands in opposition to everything holy. The word “Satan” means adversary.
Be sober, be watchful: your adversary the Devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour (1 Peter 5:8).
20. Roaring Lion
He is likened to a lion who goes about seeking its prey.
Be sober, be watchful: your adversary the Devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour (1 Peter 5:8).
21. The Angel Of The Abyss
There is some question as to whether this is a description of Satan, or merely another powerful evil angel.
They have as king over them the angel of the pit; his name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in Greek he is called Apollyon (Revelation 9:11).
22. Apollyon And Abaddon
He is called Apollyon and Abaddon.
They have as king over them the angel of the pit; his name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in Greek he is called Apollyon (Revelation 9:11).
The idea behind these terms is “destroyer.” Satan has been filled with hatred against God from the beginning, and has attempted to destroy every good thing that God has done.
23. Dragon
Satan is called the dragon.
And the great dragon was cast down, the old serpent, he that is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world; he was cast down to the earth, and his angels were cast down with him (Revelation 12:9).
The term dragon is associated with those who oppose God.
24. Old Serpent
He is also known as the old serpent.
And the great dragon was cast down, the old serpent, he that is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world; he was cast down to the earth, and his angels were cast down with him (Revelation 12:9).
This reminds us of the Garden of Eden when Satan came to Adam and Eve in the form of a serpent. It speaks of his cunning.
25. Deceiver Of The Whole World
This fallen angel deceives the unbelieving world.
And the great dragon was cast down, the old serpent, he that is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world; he was cast down to the earth, and his angels were cast down with him (Revelation 12:9).
Deception is what this being is all about – he is the master deceiver.
26. Accuser Of God’s People
God’s people are constantly accused by this evil personage.
Then I heard a loud voice in heaven, proclaiming, “Now have come the salvation and the power and the kingdom of our God and the authority of his Messiah, for the accuser of our comrades has been thrown down, who accuses them day and night before our God” (Revelation 12:10).

Summary
Satan, or the Devil, is known by a number of names in Scripture. All of these names point to his evil character. The chief characteristics we find in this creature are his hostility, cunning, power, and evil intent toward God and His people.