Boy names 2014 social security

Oh Baby! Social Security Announces Most Popular Baby Names Of 2014

The most popular names for babies born in the United States for 2014 are… Noah and Emma. The list of the most popular baby names of 2014 as determined by Social Security Administration data was released earlier today. The baby naming statistics were based on nearly 4 million births in the United States for 2014.

The complete top 10 list for boys for 2014:

  1. Noah
  2. Liam
  3. Mason
  4. Jacob
  5. William
  6. Ethan
  7. Michael
  8. Alexander
  9. James
  10. Daniel

The complete top 10 list for girls for 2014:

  1. Emma
  2. Olivia
  3. Sophia
  4. Isabella
  5. Ava
  6. Mia
  7. Emily
  8. Abigail
  9. Madison
  10. Charlotte (yes, as in Princess Charlotte)

LONDON, ENGLAND – MAY 02: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge… depart the Lindo Wing with their newborn daughter at St Mary’s Hospital on May 2, 2015 in London, England. The Duchess was safely delivered of a daughter at 8:34am this morning, weighing 8lbs 3 oz who will be fourth in line to the throne. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

The Social Security Administration has released baby name data since 1997 although if you head over to the website, you can find data ranging well before that. (Warning: it’s easy to get sucked in!)

How does the Social Security Administration have all of this data? Easy. When you have a baby, one of the first things that most new parents do is get a Social Security number for the child. The process is so streamlined now that the application can happen when you submit information for the birth certificate. The card is then mailed to you.

If you decline to get a Social Security number for your child when you submit information for the birth certificate, you can always apply later – but that’s a little more complicated. You’ll have to appear at the Social Security Administration office with a form SS-5 and your child’s original birth certificate. If your child is over the age of 12 when you make the application, the child has to come along with you even if you’re the person signing the application on that person’s behalf.

(If your child is adopted, you can apply for a Social Security number before the adoption is complete for tax purposes. That process is different – as is the process for obtaining identification numbers for nonresidents. You can find information about those applications here.)

There is no charge to you to get Social Security number and card for your child. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Of course, unless you have a Gerber baby, chances are that your little one won’t be headed to work immediately so why get a Social Security number at birth? Taxes.

While you don’t have to get a Social Security number for your infant, your child must have a Social Security number in order for you to claim your child as a dependent on your income tax return. Without the dependent status, you can’t claim a personal exemption for your child. Additionally, you may not claim certain tax breaks including tax credits which could reduce your tax liability and possibly boost your refund. Those credits include the credit for child and dependent care expenses, education credits (the Lifetime Learning credit and the American Opportunity credit) and the child tax credit. It also affects how much you would be able to claim for the earned income tax credit (EITC), potentially worth thousands of dollars. Additionally, you can’t file as head of household (HOH) or qualifying widow(er) with dependent child if you would have otherwise qualified. Depending on your circumstances, that could boost your tax rate (if, for example, you lose HOH status, you’ll have to file as single).

If you don’t want to obtain a Social Security number for your child, you don’t have to get one. Some folks may object to having a Social Security number assigned – ever – for religious reasons. You can request an exemption/waiver on this basis but, ironically, you have to get a Social Security number to do so since our entire tax system is built around the number. What happens, practically speaking, is that you obtain a number solely for the purpose of filling out form 4029 (downloads as a pdf). Assuming you qualify for the exemption/waiver, you must notify the Social Security Administration that this is your intention and that you do not want a Social Security card created or mailed.

If you do opt to get a Social Security number for your child, he or she will join the more than 450 million taxpayers who have received Social Security numbers since the first number was issued on December 2, 1936. That first number, SSN 055-09-0001, belonged to John D. Sweeney, Jr. of New Rochelle, New York (a little trivia for your cocktail hour: Sweeney never received any Social Security benefits).

Social Security numbers are widely used today although there are only about 40 uses approved by Congress. That said, the Social Security Act allows states and local governments to require a Social Security number for a variety of tax and other reasons. Having the number now will make things a lot easier for little Noah and little Emma later.

“Charlotte” has vaulted into headlines for the second time this week! First the name graced front pages as the name of Britain’s new royal baby, Charlotte Elizabeth Diana.

And now it’s back — rising into the Top 10 US baby names for girls.

The Social Security Administration released its hotly anticipated list of Most Popular Baby Names of 2014 Friday, led by Emma for girls and Noah for boys. Charlotte is the only new entrant in the girls’ Top 10, along with the equally royal James on the boys’ side.

The top baby names of the year are…

May 8, 201501:03

James had been a favorite with British bookmakers had the baby been a boy. Charlotte replaces the classic Elizabeth in the girls’ Top 10, while James takes over for Jayden.

Emma reclaims the crown as No.1 girls’ name for the first time since 2008, replacing Sophia. The Biblical Noah continues the reign he started last year.

RELATED: Oh, boy! See how the top baby boys’ names have changed in 5 years

A sleeping newborn baby.

The full Top 10 for both genders are:

Girls

1. Emma

2. Olivia

3. Sophia

4. Isabella

5. Ava

6. Mia

Trending stories,celebrity news and all the best of TODAY.

7. Emily

8. Abigail

9. Madison

10. Charlotte

Boys

1. Noah

2. Liam

3. Mason

4. Jacob

5. William

6. Ethan

7. Michael

8. Alexander

9. James

10. Daniel

Classic names predominate, with only Mia and Madison on the girls’ side and Liam and Mason on the boys’ side being newer names. The rest of the Top 10 choices for both boys and girls are Biblical or classical names that have been widely used for centuries.

RELATED: Expecting soon? We’ve got a list of the most popular names for girls

The standing of names on the Top 10 remains relatively stable, with only the first three names shuffling places on the girls’ side and only Mason and Jacob switching spots on the boys’.

baby lying down on a blanket; adorable; baby; beautiful; bed; bedroom; boy; bright; care; caucasian; cheerful; child; childcare; childhood; clean; diaper; elementary; figer in mouth; girl; hands; health; healthy; home; human; hygiene; infant; joyful; kid; legs; little; looking; looking at camera; lying; naked; playful; portrait; positive; reaching; sensitive; skin; small; smiling; soft; studio; young

Celebrities and pop culture continue to have a powerful influence on the popularity of baby names. Most of the names making dramatic leaps up the charts are connected to a celebrity or a popular TV or movie character. The three hottest girls’ names — Aranza, Montserrat and spelling variation Monserrat — are all rooted in Latin soap operas. On the boys’ side, Bode, as in Olympic skier Bode Miller, was the name the rose the most spots on the list, up to No. 645.

“We are as diverse in naming our babies as we are as citizens,” says acting Social Security Commissioner Carolyn W. Colvin. “Naming your child can be both personal based on family traditions or because your favorite actor, musician, politician or TV show has a character by that name.”

Other red-hot names include Axl, as in rocker Rose and also the baby name choice of Fergie and Josh Duhamel; Maisie, as in Maisie Williams, who plays Arya on “Game of Thrones”; and Zendaya, the one-named singer.

But sometimes, what shoots up must plummet down. Miley, Britney, and Rihanna are among the 10 girls’ names making the steepest drops. On the boys’ side, celebrity-inspired choices such as Carmelo and Channing are both dropping in popularity.

‘Beautiful!’ KLG, Hoda reveal name of Britain’s baby princess

May 4, 201502:19

Charlotte seems to be a choice determined to reach the top of the list, especially now that it’s been given a new gloss thanks to the royals. No. 11 in 2013, the French feminine form of Charles, meaning “free man,” has been rising steadily for the past 15 years. The nickname Charlie is also popular for both girls and boys, given to nearly equal numbers of babies of each gender.

Notable Charlottes include the infant daughter of Chelsea Clinton, the Kristin Davis character on “Sex and the City” and Jane Eyre author Charlotte Bronte. Acting Commissioner Colvin speculated that another reason behind the popularity of the name may be that the Democratic National Convention was most recently held in Charlotte, North Carolina, named for the English Queen Charlotte who ruled with George III during the time of the American Revolution.

Introducing Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge! #RoyalBaby pic.twitter.com/HCcD7LArs5

— TODAY (@TODAYshow) May 4, 2015

James is the English form of the Hebrew Jacob, long a top name. Both mean “supplanter.” James made recent baby name news by switching genders when celebrity couple Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds bestowed it on their baby girl.

The Social Security Administration began compiling baby name statistics in 1997, when actuary Michael Shackleford set out to prove to the world that there were too many Michaels. (And as Michael turned out to be the No. 1 boys’ name for nearly half a century, Shackleford may have been right.)

Statistics stretch back to 1880 and are compiled from Social Security applications made in the year of birth. The most recent statistics, detailed on the list released Friday, cover the nearly 4 million births in the U.S. in 2014.

Today the Social Security Administration releases its annual list of the most popular names in the U.S., and for baby girls, Emma rose to take the top spot away from Sophia (who held that number one spot for the last three years). And while there was some more reshuffling in the top girl names, the only new arrival in the Top 10 is Charlotte (which pushed Elizabeth out). And this is even before England’s new princess got that moniker earlier this week. We’re betting that when the 2015 list arrives next May, Charlotte will be much higher.

As for the baby boy names, there also wasn’t a ton of shifting. Noah and Liam stay in the top 2 spots, and while Jayden fell out of the Top 10. James jumped to take his place.

Top 10 Boy Names for 2014
1. Noah
2. Liam
3. Mason
4. Jacob
5. William
6. Ethan
7. Michael
8. Alexander
9. James
10. Daniel

Top 10 Girl Names for 2014
1. Emma
2. Olivia
3. Sophia
4. Isabella
5. Ava
6. Mia
7. Emily
8. Abigail
9. Madison

10. Charlotte

And this list comes hot on the heels of Google’s newly revealed list of the most searched baby names by state.

Per Google, the top three most searched girl names in the US are Elizabeth, Olivia and Emma. And the top three boy names are Michael, James and Avery. As for Jersey? Our top names according to Google’s search list are Mia and Ethan.

More Like This:
Top Baby Names in NJ
Baby Names and Meanings
20 Things They Don’t Tell You About Pregnancy

Thomas Rhett to perform at BB&T Pavilion

Noah and Emma take the cake for the 2010s, according to the U.S. Social Security Administration’s recently released top baby names for the decade.

More than 163,000 baby boys were named Noah this decade, which moved the biblical name up 19 spots from the previous decade. The name Emma already was wildly popular in the 2000s when it was the third most popular girls’ name. More than 177,000 girls born in since 2010 have been named Emma.

The remainder of the top-5, most-popular boys’ names are Liam, Jacob, Mason, and William. Among girls, Sophia, Olivia, Isabella, and Ava round out the five most popular.

  • MORE NEWS
  • SEPTA plans Apple Pay, Google Pay rollout for mobile fares in 2020
  • FedEx driver kills suspect during robbery attempt in Northeast Philly
  • Lehigh Valley man sues U.S. Postal Service, alleges he was fired for being gay

On the boys’ names list, William has never left the Top 20 since 1900. Liam jumped in popularity this decade, starting at No. 30 in 2010 before reaching the top spot in 2017 and 2018. Mason is another 2010s success story, positioned at No. 48 in the 2000s before reaching the No. 2 spot in 2011 and 2012. The name has stayed in the Top 10 throughout the decade.

Emma’ popularity has risen since the 1990s, taking the top spot for the second half of the decade, from 2014-2018. Growing in popularity in the 2000s, Sophia was most popular from 2011-2013, while Olivia, Isabella, and Ava have held positions in the top 10 since the mid-2000s.

The administration reported 18.1 million male babies and 17.3 female babies were born this decade. Compare that to the 2000s when 21.3 million male babies and 20.3 million female babies were born.

This is inline with U.S. birthrate statistics. The number of births in the U.S. dropped for the fourth year in a row in 2018, falling to a 32-year low, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2018, 3.8 million babies were born, which was a 2% drop from 2017.

Birthrates fell across almost all racial and age groups — except for women in their late 30s and early 40s, where there was a rise in birth rates. Women are also having babies later, in general. In 2017, for the first time ever, the number of women giving birth in their early 30s surpassed the number who had children in their 20s, and that margin widened in 2018.

Below are the Top 20 baby names, for boys and girls for the 2010s, according the Social Security Administration.

Most popular boy names of the decade:

  1. Noah
  2. Liam
  3. Jacob
  4. Mason
  5. William
  6. Ethan
  7. Michael
  8. Alexander
  9. James
  10. Elijah
  11. Daniel
  12. Benjamin
  13. Aiden
  14. Jayden
  15. Logan
  16. Matthew
  17. David
  18. Joseph
  19. Lucas
  20. Jackson

Most popular girl names of the decade:

  1. Emma
  2. Sophia
  3. Olivia
  4. Isabella
  5. Ava
  6. Mia
  7. Abigail
  8. Emily
  9. Madison
  10. Charlotte
  11. Elizabeth
  12. Amelia
  13. Chloe
  14. Ella
  15. Evelyn
  16. Avery
  17. Sofia
  18. Harper
  19. Grace
  20. Addison

Follow Virginia & PhillyVoice on Twitter: @vastreva | @thePhillyVoice
Like us on Facebook: PhillyVoice
Add Virginia’s RSS feed to your feed reader
Have a news tip? Let us know.

These Are the Top 400 Baby Names of the Decade

The baby names that defined the 2010s are here. The Social Security Administration recently released the 400 most popular baby names for boys and girls. This baby name list only covers 2010–March 2019, so it doesn’t quite capture the entire decade, but it’s close.

The SSA pulled this data from Social Security card application data, which recorded more than 18.1 million male births and 17.3 million female births. Though many of the top names are familiar from other baby name lists we’ve seen, there are some surprises, so you’ll want to check and see if your little one’s name made the list. And if you’re pregnant, this SSA data may give you fresh ideas for what to name your baby.

For girls, Emma tops the list. This sweet name was number one from 2014–2018. Noah — the top name from 2013–2016 — is the most popular boy name of the decade. Liam has grabbed the number one spot for the past two years, so we’ll have to see if it keeps that title in 2019.

Most popular baby names of the decade

Below, you’ll find the top 15 baby names of the 2010s for both boys and girls, along with the number of kids born with that name from 2010 through March 2019.

Most popular boy names of the decade

Most popular girl names of the decade

Get ready to encounter lots of Emmas and Noahs on the playground soon. According to new government data, they’re the most popular baby names in America.

The Social Security Administration has tracked baby names since the 1880s, and just released its list of popular names of babies born in 2014. Noah tops the boys’ list for the second year in a row, with James being the only new addition to the most-popular rankings.

As for the girls, Emma tops the list for the first time since 2008, dethroning Sophia from the number one spot. And speaking of royalty, Charlotte was the only new entry into the top 10 this year. So it turns out the British royals (and American royal Chelsea Clinton) were completely on trend.

The Today show points out that pop-culture names are creeping their way up the list as well. The fastest-rising girls’ name, Aranza, comes from a soap opera in Latin America. Celeb names Maisie (as in Game of Thrones’ Maisie Williams) and Zendaya (as in the former Disney star) are on the rise as well. For boys, Bode (like skier Bode Miller) and Axl (as in Axl Rose) are gaining in popularity.

Check out the top 10 names for each gender:

For the Girls:

  1. Emma
  2. Olivia
  3. Sophia
  4. Isabella
  5. Ava
  6. Mia
  7. Emily
  8. Abigail
  9. Madison
  10. Charlotte

For the Boys:

  1. Noah
  2. Liam
  3. Mason
  4. Jacob
  5. William
  6. Ethan
  7. Michael
  8. Alexander
  9. James
  10. Daniel

More from Good Housekeeping:

• 13 Baby Names on the Verge of Extinction

• Why Will and Kate Chose “Charlotte Elizabeth Diana”

• 11 Classic Baby Names Ready for a Comeback

Here are the most popular baby names from 2014

WASHINGTON — Emma and Noah were the most popular baby names in 2014.

Among girls, Emma was followed by Olivia, Sophia, Isabella and Ava, according to the list released Friday by the Social Security Administration. For boys, Noah was followed by Liam, Mason, Jacob and William.

Noah was the top baby name for boys for the second year in a row. Emma was back on top for girls for the first time since 2008.

Pop culture and religion have long influenced baby names.

Emma’s popularity soared in 2002, the same year that Rachel, a character on the popular TV show “Friends,” named her baby Emma. Emma has been ranked among the top four baby names for girls since 2002, though it was just behind Sophia in 2013.

“In this era when trends come and go faster than ever before, that’s incredible staying power,” said Laura Wattenberg, founder of BabynameWizard.com. “Emma seems to be the only name that America has been able to agree on in recent years.”

James is also making a comeback, at No. 9. And Charlotte cracked the top 10 for the first time, at No. 10.

Britain’s Prince William and his wife, Kate, announced Monday that they were naming their baby daughter Charlotte. Chelsea Clinton, the daughter of Bill and Hillary Clinton, also named her daughter Charlotte.

“Charlotte’s definitely going to hit the top three in the next three years,” said Jennifer Moss, founder and CEO of Babynames.com.

The Social Security Administration’s website provides lists of the top 1,000 baby names for each year, dating to 1880. The top baby names that year were John and Mary. John is now No. 26 and Mary has fallen to No. 120.

Officials hope that people visiting the Social Security website to research baby names will also learn about Social Security programs. This year, the agency is promoting a new blog called “Social Security Matters.”

Social Security also charts the fastest-rising names each year. These names may not be in the top 10 or even the top 100, but they moved up more spots than any other.

For boys, the biggest riser was Bode, which jumped 645 spots to No. 783. Also among the top risers were Bodie and Bodhi. Bode Miller is an Olympic skier. Bodhi is a Buddhist term for enlightenment or awakening.

For girls, the runaway winner was Aranza, which jumped 3,625 spots to No. 607. Aranza is a popular Mexican singer. Also, there is a character named Aranza on the Mexican telenovela “Por Siempre Mi Amor,” which debuted in 2013.

“Since the Internet and since pop culture is so prevalent and in-your-face all the time now, parents are finding baby names from fiction, from television, from movies, from celebrities, most often,” Moss said. “And then secondly, friends and family and the family tree.”

See the Most Popular Baby Names for 2014

Noah and Emma were the most popular baby names of 2014, followed by a few newcomers to the top 10 list, like James and Charlotte.

The Social Security Administration released on Friday its annual list of the country’s ten most popular baby names for boys and girls.

James, a popular choice in the 1940s and ’50s, returned to the top 10 after missing out for several years. And Charlotte, ranked #10, made it to the list of top names for the first time ever (and the name is likely to stay there, thanks to the new arrival of Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana.) There’s even a newborn baby monkey named Charlotte at a zoo in Japan, although zookeepers are considering a name change. to avoid offending the British Royal Family.

Here’s the full list of the top 10 names for boys:

1) Noah

2) Liam

3) Mason

4) Jacob

5) William

6) Ethan

7) Michael

8) Alexander

9) James

10) Daniel

And for girls:

1) Emma

2) Olivia

3) Sophia

4) Isabella

5) Ava

6) Mia

7) Emily

8) Abigail

9) Madison

10) Charlotte

See the Funniest and Weirdest Baby PhotosShot for TIME, 2015 Evan Kafka for TIME Shot for TIME, 2015 Photo-illustration by Evan Kafka for TIME Shot for TIME, 2015 Photo-illustration by Evan Kafka for TIME Shot for TIME, 2015 Photo-illustration by Evan Kafka for TIME Personal work, 2009 Evan Kafka—Getty Images Shot for Huggies, 2011 Evan Kafka Personal work, 2009 Evan Kafka Personal work, 2009 Evan Kafka—Getty Images Personal work, 2009 Photo-illustration by Evan Kafka—Getty Images Personal work, 2011 Evan Kafka—Getty Images Personal work, 2009 Evan Kafka—Getty Images Personal work, 2009 Evan Kafka—Getty Images 1 of 13 Advertisement

Write to Charlotte Alter at [email protected]