3 liters of water

Dark circles. Deep wrinkles. Red Spots. Lack-lustre skin. She looked practically dead. What happened to this woman when she started drinking 3 litres a day will shock you!

Sarah Smith, a 42 year old British woman and a mother of two, experienced constant headaches and indigestion.

At the recommendation of her doctor and nutritionist, Sarah decided to do an experiment. She used to drink only one litre of water daily. Sarah decided to see how she would look and feel if she drank three litres of water every day for 28 days. The results were astonishing! 

Drinking 3 litres of water equates to just over 100 oz., or almost thirteen 8oz. glasses of water. If you need some help including more water in your life, try one of these paleo fruit-infused water recipes or get creative and dress up your water with fruit ice cubes!

Sarah admits that in her first photo she looked as if she was 52. That is, she actually looked 10 years older than she was. The dark circles around her eyes made her look exhausted. She also had deep wrinkles, red spots and lack-lustre skin. At the beginning of her experiment, she practically looked dead, explains Sarah.

Image Source: Daily Mail UK

Even her lips were dry and shrivelled. This is a classic sign of poor hydration. Every process in your body depends on water. Water flushes toxins from the vital organs, delivers nutrients to cells, and carries waste material and toxins from your body, so it is easy to understand how not drinking enough water can impair the health of your entire body.

Sarah start drinking 3 litres of water daily for 28 days, and the result was incredible!

I felt much better after the first week.

Sarah noticed in the first week that she was urinating more frequently, her bowels were less sluggish, and her flexibility improved.

After the second week she noticed that her headache was gone, and even her digestion improved. Her skin was less wrinkled, and her complexion was clearing.

I’d expected my stomach to feel bloated with all the extra water but it’s actually flatter than usual. And my husband says the cellulite on my bottom and thighs has vanished.

During the third week Sarah realized that she was actually eating less because drinking water with meals was making her feel fuller quicker. Previously she reached for food when she was actually thirsty. Many people mistake thirst for hunger.

After 4 weeks Sarah’s face looked completely different. It was like she was another woman. The dark circles were completely gone, and so was the redness. Her skin became smooth and had a more youthful appearance. The transformation was astonishing.

She felt healthy and full of energy. And as a bonus Sarah even lost a few pounds, which was incredible, because she did not change a thing except her water intake. For four whole weeks she was drinking 3 litres of water everyday. After seeing the change in her appearance and feeling the difference in her body, she intends to continue drinking this amount of water.

I feel fitter, leaner and healthier, and my husband and friends tell me I look ten years younger. Who in their right mind would not want to try something which gets such incredible results?

Source: dailymail.co.uk

DISCLAIMER:
This article is for informational purposes only, and is educational in nature. Statements made here have not been evaluated by the FDA. This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Please discuss with your own, qualified health care provider before adding in supplements or making any changes in your diet.

I’m not sure where I heard about this “drinking three litres of water a day” thing, but I thought, hey, I’ll give it a try and see what happens. I’d heard it creates radiant skin, but I wanted to see if it would help curb my appetite and help with weight loss.

So I bought three-litre jug of water since it would be easiest to visualise my progress, and I got to work. I was used to drinking about one litre or so a day, give or take, so bumping it up to three was quite a difference.

I planned to do it for an entire month but quickly realised that drinking three litres of water a day sucks is no joke and changed my commitment to three weeks. It was much harder than I thought. For at least the first week, I would completely forget to drink water in the morning. After my 5:45 a.m. CrossFit workout, I’d drink about half a litre, and then another half at lunchtime, but by dinner, I’d realise I had way more left to drink. I ended up having to chug two litres in the last two hours before bed. This gave me stomach cramps and made me have to get up at least four times during the night. Setting reminders on my phone didn’t help — I’d just ignore them. Drinking water became my job, and I wasn’t enjoying it.

But I committed to the three weeks, and even though I found that drinking that much water a day didn’t come naturally to me, I did experience some wonderful benefits. Here are the four things that happened to me after drinking three litres of water a day for three weeks straight.

Before:

Skin

As you can see from the “before” photo, my skin wasn’t great. I’ve battled with acne my whole life and found that dairy and sugar definitely aggravated it. This photo was taken with me two and a half years off dairy and eating sugar here and there (which explains the breakouts). But after three weeks of drinking so much water, I definitely noticed my skin clear up. While continuing to eat sweet treats every couple of days, the problem areas on my face stayed clear. Even through my period. This was pretty amazing and inspired me to stick with it.

Belly Bloat

As I shared in the past, I have issues with belly bloat, and eating sugar is the culprit. I can’t have even a bite of chocolate or a spoonful of dairy-free ice cream without my stomach waging war. But when I got my hands on a new Ben & Jerry’s flavour (oh hello there, Caramel Almond Brittle), I just had to eat a bowl. I was shocked that I felt fine. I drank a lot of water before and after, and I had no cramping and my belly looked flatter. I hadn’t changed anything in my diet, just the extra water. I was floored. And this wasn’t just a one-time thing. I experimented with cookies I baked and a chocolate bar — every time, drinking that much water each day helped prevent any digestive symptoms.

After:

Curbed Appetite

As I’ve talked about before, I’m doing intermittent fasting, specifically the 16:8 plan, where I stop eating around 7 or 8 p.m. and fast until 11 a.m. or 12 p.m. the next day. Experts say the obvious, to drink a lot of water to curb your appetite, and they’re right! Drinking a lot of water in the morning while fasting definitely kept my hunger at bay, so much so that I’d often look at the clock and realise it was past the time I was supposed to start eating.

Drinking this much water also prevented me from overeating and made me realise that before I started this experiment, my cravings weren’t actually hunger, but rather thirst. An hour after lunch, I’d often get hungry for something, but sipping down 300 ml or so satiated my need for something in my belly. I’d also take a few gulps before dinner, sip on water throughout dinner, and drink a bunch more afterward, and this reduced my cravings for late-night snacks.

Is There a Bathroom Here?

I thought I peed a lot before this experiment! If drinking water was my full-time job, hitting the ladies’ room had me working overtime. Thanks to two pregnancies and a self-diagnosed bladder the size of a lemon, I was already peeing probably at least eight times during my waking hours. Once I started drinking three litres of water a day, that increased to at least 12 bathroom visits.

This was the worst side effect of drinking three litres of water a day, but I mean, it was to be expected — what goes in must come out, right? It made it hard to leave the house because even if I peed right before I left, within five minutes, I felt like I’d have to pee again, and then 30 minutes later, I’d have to pee again! Peeing that much in a day is no fun.

On a related note, staying super hydrated also prevented any constipation whatsoever. I had no issues in that department, which made forcing myself to drink three litres of water a day worth it.

Final Thoughts

Am I still drinking three litres of water a day? Hell no! Personally, downing that much a day just didn’t come easy for me, but since I did love the benefits that came along with it, I am drinking more water than I was, aiming for one to two litres a day. And what’s great is that I’m still reaping the benefits, minus the millions of bathroom breaks.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

Everyone knows that drinking water — and making sure it’s a substantial amount — is important for a healthy lifestyle. Water lubricates your joints, protects your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues, and helps to regulate your body temperature. This would make sense since 60 percent of the human adult body is made up of water. According to a 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study, 43 percent of adults drink less than four cups of water a day, 36 percent drink one to three cups, and seven percent drink none at all.

When I first decided to start my own version of the “water diet,” it was to improve my skin. I had come across a girl who said she drank 3 liters of water per day, and that it had cleared up her acne. I don’t have terrible skin, but living in a city, it’s easy for your skin to be affected by pollution, stress, and just the overall lifestyle of a fast-paced city.

Forty-three percent of adults drink less than four cups of water per day. Photo courtesy of

What I did

Every morning, I would get up and drink an 8-ounce glass of water. I did this an hour before I had to leave my house in case I needed to go to the bathroom. When I got to work, I filled up my 16-ounce water bottle and drank it through a straw. For some reason, drinking though a straw helped me to drink more because I would take sips without thinking. I had to fill this up six times per day to get the 3 liters.

For the first few days, I made a conscious effort to keep up with this, but after day four, I started to write down how many ounces I drank just to keep track. I ended up having to use the bathroom seven times during the workday and, like I did in the morning, I drank my last glass an hour before heading home out of fear I’d need to make a pit stop while I was traveling.

How I felt

I noticed changes right away. After drinking so much water, I felt a little more energized, and my naturally dry skin felt softer and suppler. I also felt like my constant snacking habits had been curbed. I still ate a normal amount of meals every day, but I snacked a little less. I also noticed that the pores on my face seemed to shrink. This wasn’t evaluated by a dermatologist or any other medical professional, however, so I’m not quite sure if this can be attributed to the amount of water I was drinking or something else coincidental.

What I didn’t like

This answer might seem obvious, but having to use the ladies’ room so often can be quite annoying. I’m lucky that I work in an office with an easily accessible ladies’ room, but I wouldn’t suggest this to someone who is constantly traveling or who would have to search high-and-low to find the nearest restroom. I also didn’t like the fact that this didn’t come naturally to me, meaning it was very difficult for me to keep up with drinking the water. I had to make a conscious effort to make sure I drank the 3 liters. I’d do this even if I didn’t achieve the daily amount by bedtime — often, this resulted in waking up in the middle of the night to use the restroom.

If you’re curious, I’d recommend giving this a try to see any positive effects it might have on your body. However, be aware that overconsuming water can also be harmful — it’s not unheard of for it to cause brain edema (swelling) — so check with your medical provider to determine what amount would suit your body best.

She points out that the “legitimate” organizations that perpetuate the myth, like Hydration for Health, have ulterior motives. They recommend 1.5 to 2 liters a day. (8 glasses measures out to 1.89 liters.) Danone, maker of bottled water, among other things, also happens to own the organization. No substantial literature exists to support the claim.

Again, we already knew this. In 2002, a similar study came out of Dartmouth Medical School, where the professor in question argued against the eight-a-day rule.

An American Journal of Psychology article believes the recommendation sprouted when the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council recommended approximately “1 milliliter of water for each calorie of food,” which would equals about 64 ounces, or 8 glasses.

But, in the next sentence the council added, that “most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods.” People ignored that detail, so the recommendation was misinterpreted.

So no more hyper-hydration. Now that you’ve got that straight, think of how much you’ll save on toilet paper.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to [email protected]

Rebecca Greenfield is a former staff writer at The Wire.

Photo:

Water has gone beyond simply being good for us: reusable water bottles have become a statement unto themselves, signaling our health- and environmental-consciousness to the world. We’re so conditioned to constantly guzzle water that some people panic if they don’t have it on their person at all times. But how much water do we actually need to drive every day? We spoke with a doctor to find out.

While a lot of people may disagree about the exact amount of water you should drink each day, we do know that our needs differ depending on our body type, how active we are, our diets and other health factors. Because there’s no specific measurement that will fit all people, I consulted Dr. Pamila Brar, an internist with more than 20 years of experience, to get some basic guidelines. She suggested the following, presuming you live in a temperate climate:

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  • Men should drink about three liters (about 13 cups) of total fluids a day
  • Women should drink about 2.2 liters (about nine cups) of total fluids a day

This is just a baseline, of course. If you exercise, spend time in hot or dry weather, you consume a significant amount of diuretics (e.g. caffeinated drinks like soda), or your medications require additional water consumption, you may need more water. The easiest way to handle your water consumption is to stick with the baseline above and add more water whenever you feel thirsty.

How can I make sure I get enough water?

Presuming you’re awake for approximately 16 hours per day, you’ll have to drink between 4.65 and 6.25 fluid ounces per hour. That may seem like a lot, but it isn’t much more than four to eight sips per hour (depending on how much you take in). If you always have water with you and have an easy method of refilling (e.g. sink, water cooler, etc.) you won’t have too much trouble.

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Also, don’t forget that many foods contain water, and that counts too. Per Lifehacker health editor, Beth Skwarecki:

We get roughly half of our daily water intake as food: watermelon and soup are more than 90% water, as you may have guessed, but even a cheeseburger is 42%. We also get water from other drinks like soda and coffee, even if they have caffeine. (While caffeine can act as a diuretic, your body adapts to that effect over time.)

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Aside from remembering, many people don’t drink enough water because they don’t like the taste. Sometimes this is a problem with tap water more than water itself, so consider a water cooler for your home if you hate the taste of tap water, don’t like the negative environmental impact of bottled water, or want to pay much for the vital beverage. If that’s not the problem, there are many ways you can augment water’s natural flavor to help you enjoy it more. And don’t forget: foods and beverages other than actual water count towards your daily intake.

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Can I drink too much water?

You can have too much of anything, but you’ll find it challenging to have too much water. Dr. Brar explains:

In a healthy adult, the kidneys can filter and excrete 15 liters of water a day. So you are unlikely to get too much water, provided you don’t drink an enormous amount at one time. Just remember to pay attention to thirst cues, try to anticipate when activities or the weather might increase your need for water, and carry water with you always.

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For most of us, too little water is more of a problem than too much. Drinking 15 liters of water each day would not only take quite some time but make you feel very uncomfortable. There are really no circumstances where you’d accidentally drink too much water (aside from drowning/water accident situations), so drinking more than you need is a safer bet than drinking too little.

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What happens if I don’t get enough water?

While more water than you need is unlikely to hurt you, too little water can cause all sorts of problems. Water aids in digestion, makes your skin look healthier, helps you feel more full so you don’t overeat, keeps your kidneys healthy (so they can properly flush out toxins) and contributes to regular healthy bowel movements. You lose out on those benefits if you don’t stay hydrated. Additionally, dehydration makes you feel tired and fatigued. Dr. Brar explains why:

Dehydration makes you feel tired. The right amount of water will help your heart pump your blood more effectively, and water can help your blood transport oxygen and other essential nutrients to your cells. Water also helps energize your muscles and prevents cramping. This is especially important if you find yourself tired at the gym. You should drink two cups of water about two hours before you exercise.

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Water won’t just help you stay more awake and alert during the day, but also reduce fatigue during sports and exercise. While the benefits it provides are important, this is one benefit that’s especially relevant to those who work often and for long hours (especially when caffeine’s thrown into the mix).

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Ultimately, you can get by without sufficient water but you won’t feel good. While it may be tough at first to drink as much as you need, practice will help you form good hydration habits that will lead to better overall health. Getting more water throughout the day is a good opportunity to stand up and walk around so you’re not sitting or going without a break for too long. It’s no surprise that water is good for you, but the benefits of sufficient hydration are many and well worth the trouble.

This story was originally published in 2013 and was updated on 12/5/19 to provide more thorough and current information.

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Who drinks water? The Queen of England does. So does three-time NBA champion LeBron James. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg drinks water. In fact, just about everybody across the world drinks the life-giving beverage. But are you drinking enough? Doctors recommend that you drink 3 liters of water a day in order to stay hydrated and to perform at your best. Read on to find out all the health benefits of getting your recommended dose of H2O.

Here are the Top 10 from Health Fitness Revolution and author of the book ReSYNC Your Life Samir Becic:

  • Cleanses toxins inside your body

By drinking 3 liters of water daily, it helps to flush out bacteria and toxins that are trapped within your system. Studies show that by drinking more water, the kidneys get rid of the waste and toxins that pass through the liver.

  • Drink for clear glowing skin

Drinking water helps to hydrate your skin barrier, and flush out the bacteria underneath the surface of your skin that causes acne. Stress, your diet, environmental factors also trigger acne. If your skin is dehydrated or stressed, water can definitely help clear your skin.

  • Boosts immune system

Drinking water ensures that your blood will carry plenty of oxygen throughout the cells in your body. Your immune system uses something called lymph to carry water and nutrients to your blood cells.

  • Fights kidney stones and general ailments

if you’re prone to getting sick, drinking three liters can help fight infections, clear allergies, and kidney stones.

  • Weight loss

Water can curb your appetite and since it devoid of calories, it can help you reduce calorie intake. Drinking 500 ml of water before each meal is a great way to do so. Oftentimes, when people think they are hungry, they are actually simply dehydrated.

  • Gives you energy

Ever heard of the saying “ it quenches your thirst”? Well the saying is true. By keeping yourself hydrated, you can give yourself more energy and perform better mentally and physically.

  • Normal bowel movements

Drinking water helps aids digestion and removes waste. So if you are having constipated bowel incontinence, drinking three liters of water a day will help that. Drinking water with a lemon in the mornings before breakfast can help bloating and digestion as well.

  • Increases mental and physical performance

When we don’t drink enough fluids like water, our mental capacity can decrease. Humans cannot live or function properly without H20, which is why athletes can suffer from hypovolemia (a disorder that causes decrease of blood plasma)

  • Prevents headaches

Water can help cure hangovers as well as headaches. If you want to go an all natural en route and not take medicine, the great thing is water is readily available anywhere and it’s cheap in the United States.

  • Prevents cramps

For the ladies, it can help prevent cramps – You may be experiencing either an electrolyte imbalance or even a mineral deficiency. When you’re on your menstrual cycle, your muscles are contracting even more so drinking three liters daily will help your muscles.

Here are some of our favorite items to buy when drinking water recommended by HFR team and author of the book ReSYNC Your Life Samir Becic:

  • A water bottle with measurements to make it easier to track water intake.
  • Brita Water Pitcher to share a glass with friends and family.

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I’m not sure where I heard about this “drinking a gallon of water a day” thing, but I thought, hey, I’ll give it a try and see what happens. I’d heard it creates radiant skin, but I wanted to see if it would help curb my appetite and help with weight loss.

So I bought a gallon jug of water since it would be easiest to visualize my progress, and I got to work. I was used to drinking about 40 or so ounces a day, give or take, so bumping it up to 128 ounces was quite a difference.

I planned to do it for an entire month but quickly realized that drinking a gallon of water a day sucks is no joke and changed my commitment to three weeks. It was much harder than I thought. For at least the first week, I would completely forget to drink water in the morning. After my 5:45 a.m. CrossFit workout, I’d drink about 20 ounces, and then another 20 at lunchtime, but by dinner, I’d realize I had way more left to drink. I ended up having to chug 80 ounces in the last two hours before bed. This gave me stomach cramps and made me have to get up at least four times during the night. Setting reminders on my phone didn’t help — I’d just ignore them. Drinking water became my job, and I wasn’t enjoying it.

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But I committed to the three weeks, and even though I found that drinking that much water a day didn’t come naturally to me, I did experience some wonderful benefits. Here are the four things that happened to me after drinking a gallon of water a day for three weeks straight.

Am I still drinking a gallon of water a day? Hell no! Personally, downing 128 ounces a day just didn’t come easy for me, but since I did love the benefits that came along with it, I am drinking more water than I was, aiming for 60 to 80 ounces a day. And what’s great is that I’m still reaping the benefits, minus the millions of bathroom breaks.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

I drank 3 liters of water a day for a week, and here’s what happened

There are a few water challenges out there. I took the “drink 3 liters a day challenge”, and this is how things went.

Choosing the challenge

The two most known water drinking challenges are drinking 3 liters a day and drinking a gallon a day. And by gallon, I mean a USA measurement gallon, which is 3.79 liters.

I decided to go with the 3 liter challenge for two reasons.

First, drinking a gallon of water a day just seemed ridiculous.

Second, the 3 liter is easier not only because it’s less water, but because the standard bottled water size is 500ml, which is 1/2 liter. This means 6 bottles a day is 3 liters. Easy to measure.

Preparation

Drinking water is something I was already doing, but even before I started with the 3 liter challenge, I realized that drinking 6 bottles a day means an entire 24-pack of water would be gone in 4 days.

My preference for bottled water is Aquafina brand, and the lowest cost for a 24-pack here in Tampa Bay Florida is 5 bucks. Yes, that means it’s just 21 cents per bottle, but over the course of a month that’s 7.5 24-packs of water, or $37.50.

I wasn’t about to pay that kind of cash just for bottled water. Screw that.

Bottled water can be had for much cheaper just by getting a generic brand. Or the cost can even be cut further buying gallon jugs.

What I decided to do was buy a 5-cup Brita watcher pitcher. Cheap, small, and the filter lasts about 2 months. Yes, I decided to drink right from the tap in my home. I have well-based water anyway.

The pitcher paid for itself fairly quickly, so it was the right choice.

I had something like 12 bottles left from the 24-pack of Aquafina I had, so I drank all those, then switched to filtered water out of the Brita pitcher. I clean and reuse the Aquafina bottles just to measure 500ml since it’s easy.

Yes, there is inconvenience using the pitcher because it is always taking space in the fridge, and it takes time to filter and cool the water. But for water drinking challenges, filtered tap is the most cost effective solution.

Things that happened and things that didn’t

Skin elasticity

Supposedly, drinking a lot of water increases skin elasticity which is an anti-aging thing. I didn’t notice anything like that. But my color seems a little better. I’m a very fair skinned guy, so to see any color is a plus.

Hair

I wear my hair short, but did notice some more fullness. Not a crazy amount, but it was noticeable.

Energy

I have definitely noticed an energy difference when doing my two daily 15-minute workouts.

Skin healing

If I get a cut or a bug bite, the skin seems to heal a little faster now.

Sleeping

No real difference here. There was one night however where I had to get up twice to piss.

Going to the toilet

Going more often? Of course. Bothersome? No.

Did my piss color change? Yes. There was only one day where my piss was almost clear. I think it was the second day. After that it turned to a very-light-yellow color, which is normal.

The lack of craving for other drinks

This one surprised me a bit. As I started drinking more water, I felt very little desire to drink anything else. The cranberry juice and vegetable juice in the fridge, both of which I really like, now barely gets touched.

How it makes me feel overall

If I had to choose one word to accurately describe how I feel drinking 3 liters of water a day, it would be satisfaction.

Describing the satisfaction is difficult. It’s not a jumping-for-joy feeling nor a feeling of being jubilant or excitement. Rather, it’s similar to when I feel a sense of accomplishment. My body feels better for having more water in it, I feel better for putting the best possible liquid in my system, and it all just feels right.

Will I continue doing this?

Honestly, I’ve not decided yet. I like the feeling drinking 3L of water a day, but may scale it back to 2L.

The most challenging thing about the 3L-a-day challenge is simply remembering to keep drinking water. Once you get in the swing of things, drinking 3L daily is actually easy.

It’s not that my system can’t handle 3L, as it certainly can when spread over a day. But I don’t know if I could ever make it habitual to the point where I drink 3L daily without even thinking about it.

I’ll keep drinking 3L daily for now and see where it leads.

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The science
Around 70% of our bodies are comprised of water and every single cell and organ needs water to work.

The experiment
To drink three litres of water a day for three weeks. Caffeine and alcohol are not allowed, but the occasional herbal tea is – going three weeks without any hot drink seemed needlessly terrorising.

Getting started
Despite having photographed my ‘before photo’ the day before, I completely forgot about the experiment on day 1, a Sunday, until lunchtime. Which meant I had an even shorter amount of time to get through the 10 and a half large glasses I worked out were the equivalent of three litres. Which meant I could only down nine glasses before bedtime. I went to bed thinking nine glasses was not a bad start. And then was up every hour for the first three hours to go to the loo.

Day 2
Starting with the water first thing is a lot easier, and I’m already a litre and a half down by lunchtime. Ha! I’m also struggling with the worst headache I’ve had in quite a few years. Possibly caffeine withdrawal, though I don’t drink coffee very often. I’m quite a fan of tea though. Who knew it was having such an effect?

RELATED: THE WORST FAD DIETS TO AVOID AND WHY

Week 1
The rest of the week wasn’t really much better. The intense headache lifted but a dull ache lasted for days, I felt extremely tired and by the time it came to Friday the last thing I felt like was going to a wedding dinner and toasting with water all night, but that’s exactly what I did.

I must have consumed about two and a half litres of water that evening, on top of the two litres I’d had already that day – blame the toasting. Still, I had a really good time, enjoyed long chats I can subsequently remember every word of, and left before it got to the stage of listening to the same conversation over and over again with friends who weren’t drinking water.

Weekend 1
Something happened on the Saturday morning. I woke up full of energy, feeling happy and excited about the weekend ahead. This is what people rave about I thought smugly.

But no. Sunday I had gone back to feeling tired again. And I really struggled over the weekend to manage to drink the three-litre quota every day. It’s fine in the office, where I spend hours sitting at a desk with a glass of water within reach. But on the go at the weekend, it’s hard to fit in drinking all that water as well. Not to mention making sure I always had access to a toilet when out shopping, walking in the park and on public transport.

Week 2
Halfway through the second week, I was feeling very bloated. Was it the water I wondered? Or was it the fact I appeared to be eating like a horse; the water – far from filling me up and reducing my appetite, like it’s apparently supposed to – seemed to be making me feel even more hungry. It was hard to resist the stack of biscuits and chocolate that are a permanent feature of the Good Housekeeping web desk. And I was still feeling tired.

Weekend 2
By the end of the week I was bloated, fat, tired and miserable, my skin was just as dry, my hair just as frizzy, and my clothes were cutting uncomfortably into me. I did a weekend birthday party on two and a half pints of water and a herbal Jasmine tea and warned everyone of the dangers of a water diet. Then I treated myself to a decaf skinny Cappuccino and felt better.

RELATED: COMMON WATER MYTHS BUSTED

Week 3
I didn’t have great hopes for week 3. I was just looking forward to it being over to be honest.

But despite the fact it was being such an endurance test to get to the end of week three, and despite the fact I had only planned to try the experiment for three weeks, at the end of the week I decided I would carry on for one more week to see if I would feel any better.

Week 4
I didn’t. And I don’t think I looked any better either. Here’s the final photo, taken after the experiment. Judge for yourselves. Friends told me I was looking better – but I think they were just being kind.

I have learned quite a lot of useful info from the experiment however. Here it is:

1. Fad diets don’t work. Forcing yourself to do something obsessively, whether it’s drinking water or cutting out sugar, will not automatically make you feel better. It may do (it didn’t work for me), but there are no guarantees.

RELATED: WHEN THE WATER DIET WORKS – READ A SUCCESS STORY

2. It’s much better to aim for a healthy balance and find out what feels right for your body. Three litres a day felt like I was force-feeding and making myself feel miserable. But two litres felt just about right.

3. There is no evidence that drinking three litres of water a day is ‘better’ than drinking two.

4. Neither is there evidence to show that drinking too much water can have an adverse effect on your health. Experts recommend matching intake to output. Professor Tom Sanders, professor of Nutrition and Dietetics at King’s College London, explains that the majority of people need 1ml of water per calorie used up, but stresses that fluid recommendations are individual and depend on factors such as body weight and size, age and gender, levels of physical activity and the temperature of our environment.

5. You don’t have to stand by the sink/water cooler/fridge downing lashings of liquid to keep hydrated. Evidence-based guidance suppied by the Natural Hydration Council recommends an intake of between two and two and a half litres a day, of which 400-600 ml is from food. The most hydrating foods are melons, soups, fruit and vegetables.

So find the happy medium within the guidelines that works for you. All things in moderation is my new motto. Including moderation.

And no, I won’t be doing a water diet again.

Photos: Rob Wilson Jnr, Fluid4Sight

THE average adult can survive for a three to five days without water.

As someone whose body seems to function solely on coffee, this doesn’t surprise me.

12 Coffee fiend Sophie Swietochowski, pictured before the experiment, gulped three litres of water a day for a week to see if it would improve her healthCredit: Nick Obank – The Sun 12 Sophie, pictured after the experiment, says her skin looked clearer, her hangovers were not as severe and she slept betterCredit: stewart williams

It’s often afternoon before I feel the urge to take a sip from my water bottle and just a couple of big gulps will satisfy my thirst.

I never reach the recommended daily amount of two litres. In fact, my body seems to cope perfectly fine with just one.

But considering our brains are 77% water, one litre doesn’t seem like a lot.

There are trillions of cells in our body and every single one of them requires water to function. So it seems logical that the more liquid we put in, the better we operate.

12 Supermodel Elle MacPherson claims drinking three litres of water a day keeps her looking youngCredit: Instagram 12 Beyonce drinks more than a gallon of H20 a dayCredit: Instagram

Elle MacPherson and Beyonce claim their flawless, youthful looks are all down to three litres of H20 on the daily, according to The Cut.

This left me wondering… have I been damaging – and even ageing – my body by drinking so little?

Research shows that aside from maintaining bodily functions, drinking lots of water can also help solve many health problems including headaches, indigestion, fatigue and stress, as well as improve the physical appearance of our skin and aid with weight loss.

Apparently almost every common health issue or skin related problem can be helped with a bit of water.

Having suffered from insomnia and dry skin for my entire adult life, I was keen to put this theory to the test.

The challenge: Drink three litres of water a day for one week to see if water really is the miracle cure that science suggests it to be.

12 Sophie was suffering with insomnia and skin breakouts before the experimentCredit: Nick Obank – The Sun

The experiment

Before beginning the experiment I paid a visit to my GP to see how drastically upping my water intake (and exceeding the recommended daily amount) would improve or harm my body.

Despite the obvious health benefits, I was surprised to learn that there can be some serious risks that come with over-drinking.

I’m told that drinking too much, especially in cold climates and alongside a sedentary lifestyle, can lead to water-leakage in the brain.

But if I drank regularly throughout the day and continued with my current exercise regime, I was at very low risk of this.

Day 1

12 Sophie went to the loo 12 times on the first day of the experimentCredit: Sophie Swietochowski

A sucker for expensive skincare products with exotic ingredients, I was feeling pessimistic for the week ahead. Surely a few glasses of water wouldn’t compare to my £46 tub of Clinique moisturiser?

It took me until 3pm to finish my first litre and the rest of the day was then spent between my desk, frantically guzzling from my bottle and the toilet – which I visited 12 times that day!

Slumped in bed feeling sick, bloated and uncomfortable, I realised I’d been naïve to the difficulty of my challenge.

Integrating this much water into my daily routine was going to be tricky.

Day 2

12 Sophie struggled to guzzle down three litres of water on day twoCredit: Sophie Swietochowski

I neither looked nor felt any different waking up the next day. I reluctantly filled my bottle at 7am, determined not to repeat yesterday’s mistake. And my mood didn’t improve when nature called whilst out on a lengthy dog walk. Surrounded by shrubbery and not a toilet in sight, my options were limited.

Evening came and I wasn’t surprised that I’d seen no obvious change at this early stage. But my constant need for the loo was really getting in the way of daily life. Surely I couldn’t survive the week like this?

Day 3

12 Sophie started noticing improvements in her skin on day threeCredit: Sophie Swietochowski

Satisfied from a great night’s sleep and suddenly noticing a surprising softness to my skin, the previous days’ woes were quickly forgotten. Although I couldn’t physically see any changes, my skin felt smoother and it seemed to be absorbing my moisturiser much better.

Having not eaten much that day, I was taken aback by my sudden burst of energy at the gym. With more stamina and fewer food cravings, I was finally starting to see some small but significant benefits.

Day 4

12 Sophie says the copious amounts of water helped ease her hangoverCredit: Sophie Swietochowski

I was relieved that my body had finally adjusted to my new routine; the bloating subsided and I was no longer running to a toilet every two minutes – HOORAY!

Having indulged in a few glasses of wine the night before, I was anticipating the familiar, post-alcohol headache. But feeling fully hydrated, the sore head never came – why had I never tried this before?! I’d expected better skin, but it hadn’t dawned on me that water was also an unbeatable hangover cure!

Watching my friends suffer on their sofas only made me more smug.

How much water should I drink a day?

The NHS advise drinking six to eight glasses of fluids per day.

Roughly speaking, this is about three or four 500ml bottles of water.

And it’s not a good idea to over-do it, because this can impact negatively on your health too.

Water isn’t the only drink which counts. Low-fat milks and sugar-free drinks, as well as plain breakfast tea, coffee and herbal tea all count.

In the UK, the average soft drink comes in a 330ml bottle.

But beware, caffeine can be dehydrating – while juice and smoothies contain natural sugars which damage your teeth.

Drink no more than 150ml of juice per day, and try to stick to no-added-sugar squash.

Sipping on sparkling water, or adding a slice of lemon or lime to normal tap water, can be a good idea for those who don’t like the taste of H20.

Everyone’s slightly different, but passing clear urine is a good sign that you are hydrated.

Day 5

12 Sophie managed to drink 3.5 litres of water on day fiveCredit: Sophie Swietochowski

I was at last starting to actually see the impact of the water. The dark and indented bags under my eyes looked lighter and less heavy. And despite the early start to my morning, my eyes themselves looked brighter.

Greeted with some rare British sunshine and having sweated out much of the liquid I’d put into my body, I surprised myself by exceeding my three litre target (I drank 3.5 litres). I felt much thirstier than usual and regular sips of water were becoming a necessity.

Day 6

12 Sophie says the water helped clear her skin, making it look more dewyCredit: Sophie Swietochowski

With the week drawing to a close, I was in a positive mind-set with clearer skin and a clearer head. I was surprised at how quickly my skin had changed, it had all-over dewy consistency and seemed plump and fresh.

I was still popping to the toilet more than usual, but the pros outweighed this con.

Day 7

12 Sophie felt – and looked – radiant on day sevenCredit: stewart williams

At the end of the challenge I felt and looked healthier. The results were beyond anything I’d expected.

The biggest change was in my skin. My face was no longer dry and blotchy, it felt hydrated, smooth and the dull bags under my eyes had faded.

I’d lost a tiny bit of weight (0.4kg), but as I’m firmly within the healthy range on the BMI scale, my weight loss expectations were low.

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My insomnia on the other hand had dramatically improved. And although it wasn’t cured, I was sleeping deeply and for longer. I woke up feeling rejuvenated and energised in the mornings.

I’m not tempted to ditch my moisturiser just yet, but my days of drinking just one litre are certainly in the past.

Meanwhile, I put Vogue’s bottle of wine-a-day diet to the test – with stomach-churning results.

And, I tried food well past their sell-by dates… so you don’t have to.

We tested Vogue’s wine and egg crash diet from 1970

© Getty Woman holding glass of water I’m not sure where I heard about this “drinking three litres of water a day” thing, but I thought, hey, I’ll give it a try and see what happens. I’d heard it creates radiant skin, but I wanted to see if it would help curb my appetite and help with weight loss.

So I bought three-litre jug of water since it would be easiest to visualise my progress, and I got to work. I was used to drinking about one litre or so a day, give or take, so bumping it up to three was quite a difference.

I planned to do it for an entire month but quickly realised that drinking three litres of water a day is no joke and changed my commitment to three weeks. It was much harder than I thought. For at least the first week, I would completely forget to drink water in the morning. After my 5:45 a.m. CrossFit workout, I’d drink about half a litre, and then another half at lunchtime, but by dinner, I’d realise I had way more left to drink. I ended up having to chug two litres in the last two hours before bed. This gave me stomach cramps and made me have to get up at least four times during the night. Setting reminders on my phone didn’t help — I’d just ignore them. Drinking water became my job, and I wasn’t enjoying it.

But I committed to the three weeks, and even though I found that drinking that much water a day didn’t come naturally to me, I did experience some wonderful benefits. Here are the four things that happened to me after drinking three litres of water a day for three weeks straight.

© POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar© POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

Am I still drinking three litres of water a day? Hell no! Personally, downing that much a day just didn’t come easy for me, but since I did love the benefits that came along with it, I am drinking more water than I was, aiming for one to two litres a day. And what’s great is that I’m still reaping the benefits, minus the millions of bathroom breaks.

MSN are empowering Women In Sport this summer. Find out more about our campaign and the charity fighting to promote the transformational and lifelong rewards of exercise for women and girls in the UK here.

Gallery: Simple tricks to drink more water every day

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Drinking water is not only good but necessary for a healthy body and mind. Though the benefits of being sufficiently hydrated are many – such as a healthier gut and skin – many aren’t able to consume the required quantity of water. Let us take a look at some tricks to make this task easier.

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Set daily goals

Decide how many glasses (or liters) of water you want to drink every day and focus on that number. Ideally, men should consume 2.5 liters and women must drink at least two liters daily. To help achieve this target, set a fixed time for drinking water. For example, make it a rule that you drink a glass or two after every bathroom break or every time you stretch your legs at work.

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Fruit, vegetable and herb infusion

Try and mix it up a little! Instead of drinking plain water, try drinking differently flavored water every day. All you have to do is leave a few orange rinds or cucumber slices in a jar of water overnight. In the morning, you can have a cold and delicious glass of flavored water. Certain kinds of infusion – such as mint and lemon – are believed to boost weight loss. Other options include berries and watermelon.

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Buy a marked water bottle

Another way to remind yourself to drink water every day is to carry around a graded water bottle. This way, not only do you always have access to drinking water, you also get a visual reminder of how much water you have left to drink in a day.

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Use a (paper) straw

This may sound strange but drinking from a straw actually helps you drink faster! Before you know it, you will have finished your calculated water intake for the day. Remember to use paper and not plastic straws, so as to reduce your environmental impact.

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Use apps

There are several specially designed apps (for both Apple and Android phones) that can help track your water intake. Experiment with a few to settle on one that works best for you and your requirements. These apps will also send reminders for you to drink water.

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Drink hot water

A glass of hot water at night and one in the morning aids digestion. And, as with the earlier tip, you can add natural flavor to the water – think lemon and honey to simultaneously hydrate your system and soothe your throat.

8/18 SLIDES © Astrakan Images/Cultura/Getty Images

Soda, not water

Have you decided to quit alcohol and drink fruit juice instead? That’s a good step, but remember that even natural fruit juices have sugar in them. If you want to further cut back on your sugar intake, consider drinking water instead of juice.

9/18 SLIDES © Wladimir Bulgar/Getty Images

Keep that glass or bottle full

This sounds like a silly trick to play on your body but remember to keep your glass (or bottle) full of water. Studies suggest you are more likely to drink from a full vessel than one that is half-empty.

10/18 SLIDES © Lukas Vering / EyeEm/Getty Images

Alcohol – 1, Water – 1

Another great tip to keep your fluid levels up is to have a glass of water after every cocktail. This will lower the possibility of alcohol dehydration and could also save you from being hungover.

11/18 SLIDES © Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Set rules and find a water buddy

Set rules for yourself! For example, no coffee or soda until you have consumed a certain number of glasses of water. Having a water buddy, who will drink with you, is helpful too.

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Keep a water bottle while commuting

Since many of us spend a fair number of hours commuting, having a bottle of water handy ensures you never go thirsty while being on the move, especially in hot weather. Remember to use a reusable bottle to cut down on plastic wastage.

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Include water-based food in your diet

Make foods with high water content, such as cucumber and watermelon, a part of your daily diet. 14/18 SLIDES © Rimagine Group Limited/Getty Images

Make a water wager

Gang up with your friends, co-workers and gym mates and set up shared calendars to ensure you are all on the same page. You can make it more interesting by making wagers – for example, the person who drinks the least treats everyone else to a meal!

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Get a high-tech water bottle

If you want to monitor your water intake in detail, opt for a smart water bottle. Some of those available in the market record the amount you sip or drink and send the data to your cell phone through an app. They even glow to tell you to drink more water and the apps give information about your water-drinking habits.

16/18 SLIDES © Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Use a water filter

You could also go for portable bottles with attached filters since filtered water generally tastes better and is a healthier option.

17/18 SLIDES © kupicoo/Getty Images

Sip water before meals

It is generally considered a good practice to drink a bit of water before every meal, since you tend to feel a little full and that, in turn, stops you from overeating. Drinking a glass about half an hour before a meal is also believed to aid digestion.

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Keep some nearby

It’s always a good idea to keep a bottle of water on your desk or carry it in your bag while traveling. You will drink a little more if it is not a task getting to the water.

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